Top 59 Slang For Street – Meaning & Usage

The streets have their own language, with slang words and phrases that can leave you feeling lost and out of touch. But fear not, because we’ve got your back. Our team has hit the pavement, talking to locals and immersing ourselves in the urban culture to bring you a list of the top slang for street. Get ready to impress your friends and navigate the concrete jungle like a pro!

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1. Avenue

This is a type of road that runs perpendicular to the streets in a grid pattern. It is often used in addresses and is abbreviated as “Ave.”.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I live on Elm Avenue.”
  • In a conversation about directions, one might say, “Go straight until you reach 5th Avenue.”
  • A person giving their address might say, “My office is located at 123 Main Ave.”

2. Boulevard

This is a wide and spacious street, often with trees or grassy areas along the sides. It is typically a major thoroughfare in a city or town and is abbreviated as “Blvd.”.

  • For example, someone might say, “Let’s take a stroll down Sunset Boulevard.”
  • In a discussion about urban planning, one might mention, “The city is planning to widen Main Boulevard.”
  • A tourist might ask, “Where can I find the famous shops along Rodeo Boulevard?”

3. Lane

This is a narrow road or street, typically found in residential areas or rural settings. It is often used as a suffix in road names and is abbreviated as “Ln.”.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I live on Maple Lane.”
  • In a conversation about giving directions, one might say, “Take a left onto Oak Lane.”
  • A person describing their neighborhood might say, “Our community has charming cottages along the winding lanes.”

4. Road

This is a general term for a route or pathway that connects two or more places. It is often used as a suffix in road names and is abbreviated as “Rd.”.

  • For example, someone might say, “Let’s go for a drive on Ocean Road.”
  • In a discussion about infrastructure, one might mention, “The city is repairing potholes on Elm Road.”
  • A traveler might ask, “Is there a gas station nearby on this road?”

5. Street

This is a public road in a town or city, typically with buildings on either side. It is the most common term for a road and is abbreviated as “St.”.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I live on Pine Street.”
  • In a conversation about directions, one might say, “Turn right onto Main Street.”
  • A person describing a neighborhood might say, “Our street is lined with beautiful Victorian houses.”

6. Alley

An alley is a narrow passageway between buildings or behind houses. It is often used as a shortcut or for access to the rear of buildings. In slang, “alley” can refer to a backstreet or a hidden location.

  • For example, a character in a crime novel might say, “Meet me in the alley behind the bar at midnight.”
  • In a conversation about urban exploration, someone might mention, “There are some hidden gems in the alleys of this city.”
  • A person describing an off-the-beaten-path restaurant might say, “It’s tucked away in a little alley off the main street.”

7. Drive

In general usage, “drive” refers to a road or route. In slang, “drive” can simply mean street or road.

  • For instance, in a conversation about directions, someone might say, “Turn left at the next drive.”
  • A person describing their neighborhood might say, “I live on the corner of Maple Drive and Oak Street.”
  • In a discussion about urban planning, someone might mention, “The city is expanding with new drives and highways.”

8. Way

“Way” is a colloquial term for road or street. It is often used in combination with another word to refer to a specific street or route.

  • For example, someone might say, “Take a left at the next way.”
  • In a conversation about their daily commute, a person might say, “I take the highway to work, but there’s always traffic on the back way.”
  • A character in a movie might say, “I grew up on the wrong side of the way, but I made it out.”

9. Route

In general usage, “route” refers to a specific path or course. In slang, “route” can refer to a street or road.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Take the scenic route to enjoy the view.”
  • In a conversation about exploring a new city, a person might ask, “What’s the best route to get to the downtown area?”
  • A character in a book might say, “I walked down the route, taking in the sights and sounds of the city.”

10. Strip

In slang, “strip” is often used to refer to a main street or a road with a concentration of shops, restaurants, and other businesses.

  • For example, someone might say, “Let’s go for a walk on the strip and check out the shops.”
  • In a conversation about nightlife, a person might mention, “The strip is buzzing with activity on the weekends.”
  • A character in a TV show might say, “The strip used to be the heart of the town, but now it’s mostly empty storefronts.”

11. Crossroad

A point where two or more roads meet or cross each other. “Crossroad” is a slang term used to refer to an intersection, often used in the context of making a decision or facing a significant choice.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m at a crossroad in my career, and I have to decide whether to pursue further education or start working.”
  • In a song lyric, an artist might sing, “I’m standing at the crossroads, trying to find my way.”
  • A person discussing personal growth might say, “Sometimes, we have to face difficult crossroads in life to discover our true path.”

12. Cul-de-sac

A street or road that is closed at one end, with no outlet or through-traffic. “Cul-de-sac” is a French term that translates to “bottom of a sack,” referring to the shape of the street.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I live on a quiet cul-de-sac with minimal traffic.”
  • In a conversation about navigation, someone might say, “Be careful not to turn into the cul-de-sac; it’s a dead-end.”
  • A real estate agent might mention, “Many families prefer living on a cul-de-sac because it provides a safer environment for children to play.”

13. Pike

A type of toll road or highway, often with limited access and higher speed limits. “Pike” is a slang term used to refer to a turnpike, which generally implies a well-maintained road.

  • For example, a person might say, “I took the pike to get to the city faster.”
  • In a discussion about road trips, someone might suggest, “Let’s take the pike instead of the regular highway to avoid traffic.”
  • A traveler might ask for directions, saying, “Excuse me, how do I get on the pike from here?”

14. Frontage road

A road that runs parallel to a major highway or thoroughfare, providing access to businesses and properties along the main road. “Frontage road” is a term used to describe this type of road, often used in the context of providing alternate routes or access to specific locations.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Take the frontage road to avoid the traffic on the highway.”
  • In a conversation about a new shopping center, someone might mention, “The frontage road will provide easy access to all the stores.”
  • A driver might ask for directions, saying, “Can you tell me how to get to the mall from the frontage road?”

15. Ave

A wide road or thoroughfare, often lined with trees or buildings. “Ave” is a shortened form of “avenue,” commonly used in urban settings to refer to a street with a name ending in “avenue.”

  • For example, a person might say, “I live on Park Ave, right in the heart of the city.”
  • In a conversation about landmarks, someone might mention, “The museum is located on 5th Ave, just a few blocks away.”
  • A pedestrian might ask for directions, saying, “Excuse me, which way is Main Ave?”

16. Blvd

A wide street, often lined with trees or other greenery, that typically has multiple lanes of traffic. “Blvd” is a shortened form of the word “boulevard” and is commonly used in addresses and street names.

  • For example, “The restaurant is located on Main Blvd.”
  • A person giving directions might say, “Turn left onto 5th Blvd.”
  • In a conversation about urban planning, someone might mention, “The city is redesigning the blvd to include bike lanes and pedestrian walkways.”

17. St

A public road or thoroughfare that is usually lined with buildings and is used for vehicular and pedestrian traffic. “St” is a widely recognized abbreviation for the word “street” and is commonly used in addresses and street names.

  • For instance, “The store is located on Elm St.”
  • A person giving directions might say, “Go straight on 3rd St.”
  • In a discussion about city infrastructure, someone might mention, “The city is planning to repave the entire st.”

18. Rd

A long, usually paved stretch of land that is designed for vehicles to travel on. “Rd” is a shortened form of the word “road” and is commonly used in addresses and street names.

  • For example, “The house is on Maple Rd.”
  • A person giving directions might say, “Take the next right onto 10th Rd.”
  • In a conversation about traffic congestion, someone might say, “The main rd is always backed up during rush hour.”

19. Ln

A narrow road or path that is typically used for access to certain properties or as a means of reaching a specific destination. “Ln” is a commonly used abbreviation for the word “lane” and is often seen in addresses and street names.

  • For instance, “The house is on Oak Ln.”
  • A person giving directions might say, “Turn left onto 4th Ln.”
  • In a discussion about suburban neighborhoods, someone might mention, “The neighborhood has many quiet cul-de-sacs and winding lns.”

20. Dr

A road that is typically longer and winding, often leading through scenic areas or residential neighborhoods. “Dr” is a shortened form of the word “drive” and is commonly used in addresses and street names.

  • For example, “The park is located on Pine Dr.”
  • A person giving directions might say, “Continue straight on 7th Dr.”
  • In a conversation about real estate, someone might mention, “The house has a beautiful view overlooking the ocean from the backyard dr.”

21. Ct

A term used to refer to a short, narrow street or alleyway that usually ends in a dead-end or a T-shaped intersection. “Ct” is often used as an abbreviation for “court” in addresses.

  • For example, someone might say, “I live on Maple Ct.”
  • When giving directions, a person might say, “Take a left onto Elm Ct.”
  • A real estate agent might advertise a property as being located on a “quiet cul-de-sac court.”
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22. Pkwy

A term used to describe a wide road or highway that is designed to provide scenic or recreational access to a specific area. “Pkwy” is often used as an abbreviation for “parkway” in addresses.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I take the parkway to work every day.”
  • When giving directions, a person might say, “Take the next exit onto Ocean Pkwy.”
  • A traveler might ask, “Are there any rest stops along this parkway?”

23. Pl

A term used to refer to a short, usually unnamed street or road that is often a smaller offshoot of a larger road. “Pl” is often used as an abbreviation for “place” in addresses.

  • For example, someone might say, “I live on Elm Pl.”
  • When giving directions, a person might say, “Turn right onto Maple Pl.”
  • A delivery driver might ask, “Is there parking available on this place?”

24. Thruway

A term used to describe a major highway or expressway that typically spans a long distance and connects different cities or regions. “Thruway” is often used as a colloquial term for a toll road.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I took the thruway to get to the airport.”
  • When planning a road trip, a person might say, “We’ll be driving on the thruway for most of the journey.”
  • A truck driver might ask, “Are there any weight restrictions on this thruway?”

25. Esplanade

A term used to describe a long, open area or pathway that is often located near a waterfront or scenic area. An esplanade is typically designed for walking or leisure activities.

  • For example, someone might say, “Let’s take a stroll along the esplanade.”
  • When describing a vacation destination, a person might say, “The hotel is right on the esplanade, with a beautiful view of the ocean.”
  • A jogger might ask, “Is the esplanade well-lit at night?”

26. Causeway

A causeway is a raised road or path that is built across a body of water or wetland. It is often used to connect two land masses or provide a route over a marshy area.

  • For example, “The causeway provides a direct route to the island.”
  • A traveler might ask, “Is there a causeway to cross the lake?”
  • In a discussion about infrastructure, someone might say, “The construction of the causeway has improved transportation in the area.”

27. Boulevardier

A boulevardier refers to a person who frequents or lives on a boulevard, which is a wide and impressive street often lined with trees and grand buildings. It can also be used to describe someone who embodies the fashionable and sophisticated lifestyle associated with boulevards.

  • For instance, “He is a true boulevardier, always seen strolling down the grand avenue.”
  • In a conversation about city planning, one might say, “The addition of boulevards has transformed the urban landscape.”
  • A person discussing their favorite neighborhoods might mention, “I love the boulevardier vibe of that area.”

28. Corniche

A corniche is a scenic coastal road that often offers beautiful views of the sea or coastline. It is typically designed for leisurely driving or walking and is a popular destination for tourists and locals alike.

  • For example, “We took a drive along the corniche and enjoyed the stunning views.”
  • A traveler might ask, “What are some must-see sights along the corniche?”
  • In a discussion about city landmarks, someone might say, “The corniche is a highlight of this coastal city.”

29. Mews

A mews refers to a narrow street or courtyard lined with stables or carriage houses. In the past, it was commonly used to house horses and carriages, but nowadays, many mews have been converted into residential properties.

  • For instance, “The mews is a charming and historic part of the city.”
  • In a conversation about urban development, one might say, “Preserving the mews adds character to the neighborhood.”
  • A person discussing their dream home might mention, “I would love to live in a converted mews with a picturesque courtyard.”

30. Loop

The term “loop” refers to a circular path or route. It can be used to describe a specific street or road layout, as well as a transportation system that follows a looped route.

  • For example, “Take a walk around the loop to see all the shops and attractions.”
  • A commuter might ask, “Does the bus go in a loop or does it have a specific destination?”
  • In a discussion about city planning, someone might say, “The loop provides an efficient transportation option for residents.”

31. Freeway

This term refers to a major road designed for high-speed travel, usually with multiple lanes and limited access points. In some regions, it may be called an expressway or motorway.

  • For example, “We took the freeway to get to the city faster.”
  • A driver might say, “I got stuck in traffic on the freeway this morning.”
  • A person giving directions might say, “Take the freeway and exit at the next off-ramp.”

32. Byway

A byway is a small, less-traveled road that is often scenic or used as an alternative route to a main road. It is typically narrower and may have lower speed limits.

  • For instance, “We decided to take the scenic byway instead of the busy highway.”
  • A traveler might ask, “Are there any byways that lead to the beach?”
  • A person describing their road trip might say, “We took a detour along a beautiful byway and discovered a hidden waterfall.”

33. Terrace

In some regions, a terrace refers to a row of houses that are connected to each other. The term is often used in urban areas to describe a specific type of housing arrangement.

  • For example, “She lives in a charming terrace in the heart of the city.”
  • A real estate agent might advertise, “This terrace offers a unique blend of historic charm and modern amenities.”
  • A person discussing urban architecture might say, “Terraces are a common sight in many European cities.”

34. Quay

A quay is a structure built along the edge of a body of water, such as a river or harbor, for the loading and unloading of ships or boats. It is typically a solid platform or wharf.

  • For instance, “The cargo ship pulled up to the quay to unload its containers.”
  • A person describing a vacation might say, “We enjoyed a lovely dinner at a restaurant on the quay.”
  • A sailor might say, “I’ve spent many hours working on the quay, loading and unloading cargo.”

35. Main Drag

The term “main drag” is slang for the main street or primary road in a town or city. It is often used to refer to the central hub of activity or the most prominent street in an area.

  • For example, “Let’s meet up at the coffee shop on the main drag.”
  • A local resident might say, “The main drag is lined with shops and restaurants.”
  • A person giving directions might say, “Just follow the main drag until you reach the traffic circle.”

36. Backstreet

This term refers to a narrow street or alley, often found in residential areas or behind buildings. It can also be used metaphorically to describe something hidden or secretive.

  • For example, “I live on a quiet backstreet with very little traffic.”
  • In a discussion about exploring a city, someone might mention, “I love discovering the hidden backstreets and local shops.”
  • A person might say, “The backstreets of this neighborhood have so much character and charm.”

37. Sidewalk

This is the pedestrian walkway that runs alongside a street or road. It is used by people walking or jogging and is typically separated from the road by a curb or strip.

  • For instance, “The sidewalk is crowded with people during rush hour.”
  • In a conversation about safety, someone might say, “Always walk on the sidewalk and be aware of your surroundings.”
  • A person might comment, “I love taking leisurely walks on the sidewalk, especially in the evenings.”

38. Motorway

This term is used to describe a major road designed for high-speed traffic, typically with multiple lanes in each direction and limited access points. It is often used in the UK to refer to a highway or freeway.

  • For example, “We took the motorway to get to the airport.”
  • In a discussion about road trips, someone might say, “The motorway is the fastest way to travel long distances.”
  • A person might comment, “I avoid driving on the motorway during rush hour because of the heavy traffic.”

39. Turnpike

This term refers to a road or highway where drivers must pay a fee, or toll, to use it. It is often used in the United States to describe a road with limited access and high-speed limits.

  • For instance, “We took the turnpike to avoid traffic on the regular highway.”
  • In a conversation about travel expenses, someone might mention, “Make sure to budget for tolls if you’re driving on a turnpike.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer taking the turnpike because it’s usually less congested than other routes.”

40. Expressway

This term is used to describe a major road or highway designed for high-speed traffic, typically with limited access points and multiple lanes in each direction. It is often used in the United States to refer to a road without tolls.

  • For example, “The expressway is the fastest way to get downtown.”
  • In a discussion about commuting, someone might say, “I take the expressway every morning to avoid city traffic.”
  • A person might comment, “The expressway is a convenient route for long-distance travel.”

41. Crt

This is a shortened form of the word “court” and is often used to refer to a small street or alley. It can also be used to describe a cul-de-sac or a closed-off area.

  • For example, “Let’s meet at the basketball court on 5th Crt.”
  • When giving directions, someone might say, “Take a right onto Elm Crt.”
  • In a residential neighborhood, a person might describe their house as being located on a quiet Crt.
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42. Cir

This is short for “circle” and is commonly used to describe a street that forms a loop or a circular path. It often refers to a roundabout or a road that curves around a central point.

  • For instance, “The park is located at the end of Maple Cir.”
  • When giving directions, someone might say, “Take the third exit on the roundabout and continue on Smith Cir.”
  • In a suburban neighborhood, a person might say, “I live on the corner of Oak Cir.”

43. Hwy

This is a shortened form of the word “highway” and is used to refer to a major road or route that connects different cities or regions. It is often a multi-lane road with higher speed limits.

  • For example, “I took the Hwy 101 to get to the beach.”
  • When giving directions, someone might say, “Take the next exit onto Hwy 66.”
  • A traveler might ask, “Is there a rest stop on this Hwy?”

44. Trl

This is short for “trail” and is commonly used to describe a path or route that is often used for walking, hiking, or biking. It can also refer to a road or street that is less developed or paved.

  • For instance, “Let’s go for a hike on the nature trl.”
  • When giving directions, someone might say, “Turn left onto Pine Trl.”
  • A nature enthusiast might say, “I love exploring the different trls in this area.”

45. Sq

This is a shortened form of the word “square” and is often used to describe a public space or plaza in the center of a town or city. It can also refer to a street or area that is shaped like a square.

  • For example, “Let’s meet at the town sq for the farmers’ market.”
  • When giving directions, someone might say, “The restaurant is located on Main St, right off the town sq.”
  • A local resident might say, “I enjoy spending time in the sq, especially during the holidays.”

46. Ter

Short for “terrace,” this term refers to a street or road that is lined with houses or buildings on one side.

  • For example, “I live on Elm Ter, right next to the park.”
  • In a conversation about neighborhoods, someone might say, “The houses on Park Ter have such a nice view.”
  • Another person might ask for directions, saying, “Can you tell me how to get to Maple Ter?”

47. Aly

A narrow street or passageway between buildings, often used for pedestrian access or as a shortcut.

  • For instance, “Let’s take the alley behind the shops to get to the park faster.”
  • In a discussion about urban exploration, someone might mention, “There are some hidden gems in the alleys of this city.”
  • A person might warn their friend, “Don’t go down that dark alley at night, it’s not safe.”

48. Expy

A major road or highway designed for high-speed traffic, typically with limited access and multiple lanes.

  • For example, “Take the expy to get downtown, it’s faster than the regular roads.”
  • In a conversation about traffic, someone might complain, “The expy was completely backed up during rush hour.”
  • A person might give directions, saying, “Once you get on the expy, it’s a straight shot to the airport.”

49. Grn

This term is often used to refer to a street or road that has a lot of trees or greenery along its sides.

  • For instance, “I love walking down Maple Grn, it’s so peaceful with all the trees.”
  • In a discussion about urban planning, someone might say, “We should focus on adding more green streets to improve the aesthetics of the city.”
  • A person might suggest a scenic route, saying, “Instead of taking the main road, let’s go through the park on Green Grn.”

50. Grv

A street or road that is lined with a small group of trees or a small forested area.

  • For example, “The houses on Oak Grv are nestled among the grove of trees.”
  • In a conversation about landscaping, someone might mention, “I love the look of the houses on Pine Grv with the grove in front.”
  • A person might suggest a peaceful walk, saying, “Let’s take a stroll through the grove on Willow Grv.”

51. Hts

This is a common abbreviation for the word “heights” and is often used in street names or addresses.

  • For example, “123 Oak Hts” would refer to a house located on Oak Heights.
  • A person might say, “I live in the Hts neighborhood.”
  • In giving directions, someone might say, “Turn left onto Elm Hts.”

52. Jct

This is a shortened form of the word “junction” and is typically used in street names or signs to indicate an intersection or meeting point of two or more roads.

  • For instance, “Main St Jct” would refer to the intersection of Main Street with another street.
  • A person might say, “Take a right at the next Jct.”
  • In giving directions, someone might say, “Go straight until you reach the Jct, then turn left.”

53. Mnr

This is an abbreviation for the word “manor” and is often used in street names or addresses to describe a large country house or estate.

  • For example, “123 Oak Mnr” would refer to a house located on Oak Manor.
  • A person might say, “I live in the Mnr neighborhood.”
  • In giving directions, someone might say, “Turn right onto Elm Mnr.”

54. Mtwy

This is a shortened form of the word “motorway” and is commonly used in street names or signs to indicate a major road designed for high-speed traffic.

  • For instance, “Main St Mtwy” would refer to a road that functions as a motorway.
  • A person might say, “Take the Mtwy to get downtown.”
  • In giving directions, someone might say, “Merge onto the Mtwy and take the first exit.”

55. Pth

This is an abbreviation for the word “path” and is often used in street names or signs to indicate a narrow track or trail for pedestrians or cyclists.

  • For example, “123 Oak Pth” would refer to a street or walkway called Oak Path.
  • A person might say, “Let’s take a walk along the Pth.”
  • In giving directions, someone might say, “Follow the Pth until you reach the park.”

56. Plz

This is a shortened form of the word “please” and is often used as an abbreviation in written communication, especially in informal or online contexts.

  • For example, someone might say, “Can you pass the salt, plz?”
  • In a text message, a person might write, “I’ll be there in 5 mins, plz wait for me.”
  • A comment on social media might read, “Plz tell me where you got that shirt, it’s amazing!”

57. Rte

This is a shortened form of the word “route” and is commonly used in place of the full word, especially in transportation or navigation contexts.

  • For instance, someone might ask, “What’s the best rte to get to the airport?”
  • In a discussion about road trips, a person might say, “We took the scenic rte along the coast.”
  • A GPS device might instruct, “Turn left at the next rte to reach your destination.”

58. Tpke

This is a shortened form of the word “turnpike” and refers to a type of toll road or highway. The term is often used in the names of specific roads or to indicate a toll road in general.

  • For example, someone might say, “Take the tpke and get off at the next exit.”
  • In a conversation about travel, a person might mention, “I prefer driving on the tpke because it’s faster.”
  • A road sign might indicate, “Toll ahead on the tpke, prepare your payment.”

59. Xing

This is a shortened form of the word “crossing” and is commonly used in street signs or road markings to indicate a place where two or more roads intersect.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Be careful when you approach the xing, there’s a lot of traffic.”
  • In a discussion about pedestrian safety, a person might mention, “Always use the designated xing when crossing the street.”
  • A road sign might indicate, “Pedestrian xing ahead, yield to pedestrians.”