Top 35 Slang For Suffer – Meaning & Usage

Suffering is a universal experience, and sometimes we need the right words to express our struggles. In this listicle, we’ve gathered the top slang terms that encapsulate the feeling of suffering in a modern context. Whether you’re going through a rough patch or just want to stay up-to-date with the latest language trends, this article is sure to resonate with you. Keep reading to discover how to articulate those tough moments with a touch of contemporary flair.

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1. Hurtin’

This slang term is used to describe someone who is experiencing physical or emotional pain.

  • For example, “After running a marathon, my legs were hurtin’ for days.”
  • A person going through a breakup might say, “I’m hurtin’ right now, but I’ll get through it.”
  • Someone with a headache might complain, “My head is really hurtin’ today.”

2. Struggling

This term is used to describe someone who is having a hard time or facing obstacles in their life.

  • For instance, “I’m really struggling with my math homework.”
  • A person dealing with financial issues might say, “I’m struggling to make ends meet.”
  • Someone going through a tough time might express, “I’m struggling with my mental health right now.”

3. Going through it

This slang phrase is used to describe someone who is facing a tough or challenging situation.

  • For example, “She’s really going through it after losing her job.”
  • A person dealing with a breakup might say, “I’m going through it right now, but I know I’ll be okay.”
  • Someone experiencing a loss might express, “I’m going through it with the recent passing of my loved one.”

4. Feeling the pinch

This phrase is used to describe someone who is feeling the effects of financial difficulties or struggling financially.

  • For instance, “With all the bills piling up, I’m really feeling the pinch.”
  • A person on a tight budget might say, “I’m feeling the pinch this month with unexpected expenses.”
  • Someone experiencing a pay cut might express, “Ever since the company downsized, I’ve been feeling the pinch.”

5. Under the weather

This term is used to describe someone who is not feeling their best or is experiencing minor illness or discomfort.

  • For example, “I won’t be able to make it to work today, I’m feeling under the weather.”
  • A person with a cold might say, “I’ve been feeling under the weather for the past few days.”
  • Someone experiencing fatigue might express, “I’m feeling a bit under the weather, I think I need some rest.”

6. In a world of hurt

This phrase is used to describe someone who is going through a tough or challenging situation.

  • For example, “After losing his job and going through a messy breakup, he’s really in a world of hurt.”
  • In a discussion about financial struggles, someone might say, “With the current economic crisis, many families are finding themselves in a world of hurt.”
  • A person dealing with a serious illness might express, “Living with chronic pain, I often feel like I’m in a world of hurt.”

7. Battling

This term is used to describe the act of actively struggling or fighting against a difficult situation or problem.

  • For instance, “She’s battling with addiction and is seeking professional help.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might say, “I’ve been battling depression for years.”
  • A person going through a difficult divorce might express, “I’m battling for custody of my children and trying to rebuild my life.”

8. In dire straits

This phrase is used to describe a situation where someone is in a state of extreme difficulty or distress.

  • For example, “After losing his job and being unable to pay his bills, he found himself in dire straits.”
  • In a discussion about a failing business, someone might say, “The company is in dire straits and may not survive.”
  • A person facing a serious illness might express, “I’m in dire straits and need immediate medical attention.”

9. Taking a beating

This phrase is used to describe someone who is experiencing a string of negative events or difficulties.

  • For instance, “After a series of failed relationships and financial troubles, he’s really taking a beating.”
  • In a conversation about a struggling sports team, someone might say, “They’ve been taking a beating all season.”
  • A person dealing with a string of bad luck might express, “I feel like I’m taking a beating in every aspect of my life.”

10. Feeling the heat

This phrase is used to describe someone who is under a lot of pressure or facing intense scrutiny.

  • For example, “As the deadline approached, she was really feeling the heat from her boss.”
  • In a discussion about a high-profile court case, someone might say, “The defendant is definitely feeling the heat from the media.”
  • A person dealing with a demanding job might express, “I’m constantly feeling the heat to meet deadlines and perform at a high level.”

11. Strapped for cash

This phrase is used to describe a situation where someone is experiencing a shortage of money or is financially tight.

  • For example, “I can’t go out to eat tonight, I’m strapped for cash.”
  • When discussing financial struggles, someone might say, “I’ve been strapped for cash ever since I lost my job.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me some money? I’m really strapped for cash right now.”

12. On the ropes

This phrase is used to describe a person or situation that is facing challenges or difficulties.

  • For instance, “After losing two key players, our team is really on the ropes.”
  • When discussing a struggling business, someone might say, “The company is on the ropes and in danger of closing.”
  • A person might describe their personal struggles by saying, “I’ve been on the ropes lately, but I’m trying to stay positive.”

13. Weathering the storm

This phrase is used to describe the act of enduring or surviving a challenging or turbulent period in one’s life.

  • For example, “Despite the setbacks, she’s been weathering the storm and remaining resilient.”
  • When discussing a tough time, someone might say, “We’re all just trying to weather the storm and come out stronger.”
  • A person might describe their own resilience by saying, “I’ve been weathering the storm for years, but I refuse to give up.”

14. Feeling the burn

This phrase is used to describe the physical or emotional sensation of experiencing intense discomfort or pain.

  • For instance, “After the intense workout, I’m really feeling the burn.”
  • When discussing the effects of a spicy food, someone might say, “I love the flavor, but I always feel the burn afterward.”
  • A person might describe their emotional pain by saying, “I’ve been going through a tough time and I’m really feeling the burn.”

15. Taking the hit

This phrase is used to describe the act of accepting or enduring the negative consequences of a situation or decision.

  • For example, “She took the hit for the team and accepted responsibility for the mistake.”
  • When discussing the impact of a financial loss, someone might say, “We’re taking the hit, but we’ll bounce back.”
  • A person might describe their willingness to face the consequences by saying, “I messed up, but I’m willing to take the hit and learn from it.”

16. In the dumps

This phrase is used to describe someone who is feeling sad or depressed. It can also refer to being in a difficult or challenging situation.

  • For example, “Ever since he lost his job, he’s been in the dumps.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling a bit in the dumps today, I could use some cheering up.”
  • If someone asks how you’re doing, you might respond, “I’m a little in the dumps right now, but I’m trying to stay positive.”

17. Enduring

Enduring means to suffer or go through a difficult or challenging experience. It implies a sense of resilience and strength in the face of adversity.

  • For instance, “She has been enduring chronic pain for years.”
  • A person might say, “I’m enduring a tough time at work right now, but I know it will get better.”
  • If someone asks how you’re coping with a difficult situation, you might say, “I’m just enduring and taking it one day at a time.”

18. Straining

Straining refers to experiencing physical or mental strain or stress. It can also imply a sense of difficulty or struggle in trying to achieve something.

  • For example, “She is straining to meet the deadline for her project.”
  • A person might say, “I’m really straining to keep up with all my responsibilities.”
  • If someone asks how you’re feeling, you might respond, “I’m feeling a bit strained lately, but I’m trying to manage.”

19. Bearing the brunt

Bearing the brunt means facing the negative consequences or impact of a situation. It implies being the one who experiences the most difficulty, harm, or burden in a particular situation.

  • For instance, “As the leader, she bore the brunt of the team’s failure.”
  • A person might say, “I’m always the one who has to bear the brunt of the criticism.”
  • If someone asks how you’re doing after a difficult event, you might say, “I’m still bearing the brunt of the aftermath, but I’m trying to stay strong.”

20. Struggling to make ends meet

Struggling to make ends meet refers to experiencing financial hardship or difficulty. It implies having a hard time meeting basic expenses or maintaining a certain standard of living.

  • For example, “Ever since he lost his job, he has been struggling to make ends meet.”
  • A person might say, “I’m really struggling to make ends meet this month, I don’t know how I’ll pay all my bills.”
  • If someone asks about your financial situation, you might respond, “I’m currently struggling to make ends meet, but I’m actively looking for ways to improve my situation.”

21. Battling demons

This phrase is used to describe someone who is dealing with inner conflicts or personal challenges. It often refers to overcoming mental or emotional difficulties.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been battling my demons for years, but I’m finally starting to make progress.”
  • In a support group, a person might share, “We’re all here because we’re battling our own demons, but together we can find strength.”
  • A therapist might use this phrase to help a client understand, “You’re not alone in battling these demons, and there is hope for healing.”

22. Going through a rough patch

This phrase is used to describe a temporary period of hardship or struggle. It implies that things are not going well at the moment, but there is hope for improvement.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m going through a rough patch right now, but I know things will get better.”
  • In a conversation with a friend, one might share, “I’ve been going through a rough patch at work, but I’m trying to stay positive.”
  • A therapist might use this phrase to validate a client’s feelings, “It’s normal to go through rough patches in life, and it’s important to take care of yourself during these times.”

23. Struggling city

This phrase is used to describe a city or urban area that is experiencing difficulties or hardships. It often refers to economic, social, or infrastructure problems.

  • For example, a news article might discuss, “The struggling city is facing high unemployment rates and a lack of affordable housing.”
  • In a conversation about urban development, one might say, “We need to find solutions to revitalize struggling cities and support their communities.”
  • A politician might address the concerns of a struggling city by saying, “We are committed to investing in resources and opportunities to help this struggling city thrive.”

24. Feeling the ache

This phrase is used to describe the sensation of pain, whether it is emotional or physical. It implies a deep or lingering discomfort.

  • For instance, someone might say, “After the breakup, I’ve been feeling the ache of a broken heart.”
  • In a conversation about a sports injury, one might share, “I pushed myself too hard during the game, and now I’m feeling the ache in my muscles.”
  • A poet might use this phrase metaphorically to describe a character’s emotional state, “She walked through life feeling the ache of loneliness in her soul.”

25. Feeling the sting

This phrase is used to describe the emotional or physical impact of a painful experience. It implies a sharp or intense sensation.

  • For example, someone might say, “After the criticism, I’m feeling the sting of their words.”
  • In a conversation about a financial loss, one might share, “I invested a lot of money in that venture, and now I’m feeling the sting of my decision.”
  • A writer might use this phrase to describe the aftermath of a betrayal, “She felt the sting of betrayal as she discovered her friend’s secret.”

26. Taking a toll

This phrase is used to describe a situation or experience that is having a negative impact on someone.

  • For example, “The stress of work is really taking a toll on her health.”
  • A person might say, “The constant arguing is taking a toll on our relationship.”
  • Someone might express, “The long hours and lack of sleep are taking a toll on my mental well-being.”

27. In the thick of things

This phrase is used to describe being in the midst of a difficult or challenging situation.

  • For instance, “She’s in the thick of things trying to meet a tight deadline.”
  • A person might say, “I’m in the thick of things with this project and can’t take on any more tasks.”
  • Someone might express, “Being in the thick of things can be overwhelming, but it’s where the real progress happens.”

28. Struggling town

This phrase is used to describe a town or community that is experiencing economic or social hardships.

  • For example, “The struggling town has high unemployment rates and a lack of resources.”
  • A person might say, “The struggling town is working on revitalization efforts to attract new businesses.”
  • Someone might express, “The struggling town needs support from the government and community to overcome its challenges.”

29. Feeling the pressure

This phrase is used to describe the feeling of being overwhelmed or stressed due to high expectations or demands.

  • For instance, “She’s feeling the pressure to perform well in her upcoming exam.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling the pressure to meet the deadline for this project.”
  • Someone might express, “Feeling the pressure can be motivating, but it can also lead to burnout if not managed properly.”

30. Taking the blow

This phrase is used to describe accepting or enduring the negative consequences or effects of a situation.

  • For example, “The company is taking the blow of the economic downturn.”
  • A person might say, “He’s taking the blow for his team’s mistakes to protect their reputation.”
  • Someone might express, “Taking the blow can be tough, but it’s important to learn from the experience and grow stronger.”

31. Weathering the hardship

This phrase refers to the act of enduring or surviving through difficult or challenging situations.

  • For example, “She is weathering the hardship of losing her job and is determined to find a new one.”
  • In a discussion about overcoming obstacles, someone might say, “It’s important to stay strong and keep weathering the hardship.”
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “I’ve been weathering the hardship of a chronic illness, but I refuse to let it define me.”

32. In a rough spot

This phrase is used to describe being in a challenging or tough situation.

  • For instance, “He lost his job and is currently in a rough spot.”
  • In a conversation about financial struggles, someone might say, “I’ve been in a rough spot for a while, but I’m working on getting back on my feet.”
  • A person describing their emotional state might say, “I’m going through a breakup right now, so I’m definitely in a rough spot.”

33. In the thick of the struggle

This phrase describes being fully immersed or deeply involved in a challenging or difficult situation.

  • For example, “She’s in the thick of the struggle to save her failing business.”
  • In a discussion about the hardships of parenting, someone might say, “When you have young children, you’re constantly in the thick of the struggle.”
  • A person describing their experience with addiction might say, “I was in the thick of the struggle for years, but I finally sought help and turned my life around.”

34. Struggling village

This term refers to a village or community that is facing various difficulties or challenges.

  • For instance, “The struggling village is dealing with high unemployment rates and limited resources.”
  • In a conversation about poverty, someone might say, “Many struggling villages around the world lack access to basic necessities.”
  • A person discussing the impact of natural disasters might say, “After the hurricane, the struggling village had to rebuild from scratch.”

35. Weathering the adversity

This phrase describes the act of facing and overcoming adversity or challenges.

  • For example, “She has shown incredible strength in weathering the adversity of her illness.”
  • In a discussion about resilience, someone might say, “Weathering the adversity is what builds character and strength.”
  • A person sharing their personal journey might say, “I’ve faced many obstacles in my life, but I’m determined to keep weathering the adversity.”
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