Top 45 Slang For Sullen – Meaning & Usage

Feeling a bit moody or down? Curious about the slang words that capture that sullen mood perfectly? Look no further! Our team has put together a list of the top slang terms that encapsulate that feeling of gloom and melancholy. Get ready to expand your vocabulary and maybe even find the perfect word to express your sullen state of mind.

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1. Gloomy

Describes a person or atmosphere that is filled with sadness or a sense of darkness. It can refer to someone who is feeling down or to a somber and dreary environment.

  • For example, “She had a gloomy expression on her face all day.”
  • A person might say, “The weather has been so gloomy lately, it’s been affecting my mood.”
  • In a book review, one might write, “The author created a gloomy atmosphere that perfectly matched the protagonist’s despair.”

2. Moody

Refers to someone who experiences frequent shifts in their emotions or has a tendency to be easily affected by their surroundings. It can also describe an atmosphere that is constantly changing or unstable.

  • For instance, “She’s so moody, you never know what kind of mood she’ll be in.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling really moody lately, I can’t seem to control my emotions.”
  • In a movie review, one might write, “The film had a moody ambiance that added depth to the storyline.”

3. Dour

Describes someone who is consistently serious, stern, or unfriendly in their demeanor. It can also refer to a situation or environment that is lacking in joy or brightness.

  • For example, “He always has a dour expression on his face, it’s hard to approach him.”
  • A person might say, “The party had a dour atmosphere, nobody seemed to be enjoying themselves.”
  • In a character description, one might write, “The dour detective rarely showed any signs of happiness.”

4. Morose

Refers to someone who is deeply sad, depressed, or in a state of melancholy. It can also describe a mood or atmosphere that is filled with sadness or gloominess.

  • For instance, “She became morose after receiving the bad news.”
  • A person might say, “His morose attitude brought down the whole room.”
  • In a novel, one might write, “The author painted a morose picture of the protagonist’s life.”

5. Surly

Describes someone who is unfriendly, grumpy, or easily irritated. It can also refer to a situation or environment that is hostile or unwelcoming.

  • For example, “The surly waiter snapped at the customers.”
  • A person might say, “I avoid that surly coworker, they always ruin my mood.”
  • In a customer review, one might write, “The service was terrible, the staff was surly and unhelpful.”

6. Glum

When someone is feeling glum, they are in a state of sadness or depression. It can also refer to a person who appears sad or unhappy.

  • For example, “He had a glum expression on his face all day.”
  • A friend might ask, “What’s got you feeling so glum?”
  • When someone is feeling down, they might say, “I’m feeling a bit glum today.”

7. Pouty

When someone is pouty, they have a sullen or sulky expression on their face. It can also describe someone who is behaving in a moody or petulant manner.

  • For instance, “She crossed her arms and gave me a pouty look.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Stop being so pouty and tell me what’s wrong.”
  • When someone is upset and refusing to communicate, they might say, “I’m feeling pouty right now.”

8. Mopey

When someone is mopey, they are in a gloomy or dejected mood. It can also describe someone who is behaving in a sad or apathetic manner.

  • For example, “He’s been mopey ever since he got the bad news.”
  • A friend might say, “Snap out of it and stop being so mopey.”
  • When someone is feeling down and lacking energy, they might say, “I’m feeling really mopey today.”

9. Brooding

When someone is brooding, they are deeply absorbed in dark or troubled thoughts. It can also describe someone who is showing signs of worry or sadness.

  • For instance, “He sat in the corner, brooding over his recent breakup.”
  • A friend might ask, “Why are you brooding so much lately?”
  • When someone is lost in thought and appears sad, they might say, “I’m just brooding about my future.”

10. Sulky

When someone is sulky, they are silently showing resentment or irritation. It can also describe someone who is behaving in a moody or sullen manner.

  • For example, “She gave me a sulky look and refused to speak.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Don’t be so sulky, it’s not going to solve anything.”
  • When someone is upset and withdrawing from social interaction, they might say, “I’m feeling sulky right now.”

11. Melancholic

Melancholic is a term used to describe someone who is feeling down or experiencing a deep sadness. It often refers to a mood or temperament that is characterized by a persistent feeling of gloom or sorrow.

  • For example, “She has been in a melancholic mood ever since her breakup.”
  • A person might describe their state of mind as, “I can’t seem to shake off this melancholic feeling.”
  • In literature, a character might be portrayed as “a brooding and melancholic figure.”

12. Sombre

Sombre is an adjective that describes a dark, serious, or gloomy mood or atmosphere. It often refers to a feeling of sadness or seriousness that is not easily lifted.

  • For instance, “The funeral had a sombre atmosphere.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer sombre colors like black and gray.”
  • In a discussion about a tragic event, someone might comment, “The mood in the room was sombre.”

13. Grumpy

Grumpy is a term used to describe someone who is in a bad mood or easily irritated. It often refers to a person who is easily annoyed or shows a general displeasure towards others.

  • For example, “He’s always grumpy in the morning before he has his coffee.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t mind her, she’s just grumpy today.”
  • In a humorous context, someone might say, “I’m not grumpy, I just have a low tolerance for stupidity.”

14. Crabby

Crabby is a slang term used to describe someone who is in a bad mood or easily irritated. It often refers to a person who is grouchy or easily angered.

  • For instance, “She’s been crabby ever since she got stuck in traffic.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t know why he’s so crabby all the time.”
  • In a lighthearted way, someone might joke, “I’m not crabby, I’m just allergic to stupidity.”

15. Cantankerous

Cantankerous is an adjective used to describe someone who is bad-tempered, argumentative, or difficult to deal with. It often refers to a person who is easily provoked and enjoys complaining or arguing.

  • For example, “The cantankerous old man always finds something to complain about.”
  • A person might say, “He’s become more cantankerous as he’s gotten older.”
  • In a playful way, someone might say, “Don’t mind him, he’s just being cantankerous today.”

16. Pessimistic

This term refers to having a negative or gloomy outlook on life or a particular situation. It often implies expecting the worst outcome.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Don’t be so pessimistic, things might turn out better than you think.”
  • In a discussion about the future, a person might comment, “I’m feeling pessimistic about the economy.”
  • A friend might say, “You always see the glass half empty, you’re so pessimistic.”

17. Despondent

Despondent describes a feeling of extreme sadness, hopelessness, or depression. It often implies a lack of motivation or enthusiasm.

  • For example, “She became despondent after losing her job and didn’t leave the house for weeks.”
  • In a conversation about personal struggles, someone might say, “I’ve been feeling despondent lately, like nothing will ever go right.”
  • A friend might ask, “Is there anything I can do to help? You seem really despondent.”

18. Disgruntled

Disgruntled refers to a feeling of anger, dissatisfaction, or frustration, often as a result of unmet expectations or perceived unfairness.

  • For instance, “The disgruntled employees staged a protest against the company’s unfair policies.”
  • In a discussion about customer service, someone might say, “I was so disgruntled with their response that I decided to take my business elsewhere.”
  • A person might complain, “I’m disgruntled with the government’s lack of action on climate change.”

19. Disheartened

Disheartened describes a feeling of discouragement, disappointment, or demoralization, often resulting from a setback or failure.

  • For example, “She felt disheartened after receiving another rejection letter from a job she really wanted.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, someone might say, “I’m disheartened by the lack of progress we’ve made.”
  • A friend might offer support, “Don’t be disheartened, you’ll bounce back from this setback.”

20. Eeyore-like

This term is derived from the character Eeyore from Winnie the Pooh, who is known for his pessimistic and gloomy outlook on life. Describing someone as Eeyore-like means they have a similar demeanor.

  • For instance, “She always has such an Eeyore-like attitude, it’s hard to be around her.”
  • In a discussion about a negative person, someone might say, “He’s so Eeyore-like, always expecting the worst.”
  • A friend might tease, “Don’t be such an Eeyore, try to find something positive in the situation.”

21. Sulk

When someone is sulking, they are typically withdrawn, refusing to engage in conversation or participate in activities. It is often a result of feeling upset, frustrated, or ignored.

  • For example, “He’s been sulking in his room all day because he didn’t get his way.”
  • A parent might say, “Stop sulking and tell me what’s bothering you.”
  • In a group setting, someone might comment, “She’s in a sulk because she didn’t win the game.”

22. Wistful

When someone is wistful, they are often lost in thought, daydreaming about something they desire or something from the past. It is a bittersweet feeling that combines nostalgia and yearning.

  • For instance, “She had a wistful smile on her face as she looked at old photographs.”
  • A person might say, “I feel wistful every time I pass by our favorite childhood hangout.”
  • In a conversation about missed opportunities, someone might say, “I sometimes have wistful thoughts about what could have been.”

23. Woebegone

When someone looks woebegone, they have a sorrowful or pitiful expression. It is often used to describe someone who appears downtrodden or in a state of despair.

  • For example, “He walked into the room with a woebegone look on his face.”
  • A person might say, “I couldn’t help but feel sorry for the woebegone puppy in the shelter.”
  • In a discussion about a tragic event, someone might comment, “The survivors had a woebegone look as they recounted their experiences.”

24. Gloomy Gus

A gloomy Gus is someone who always seems to have a negative outlook or is constantly in a state of sadness. The term is often used to describe someone who brings down the mood or dampens the atmosphere.

  • For instance, “Don’t invite him to the party, he’s such a gloomy Gus.”
  • A person might say, “She’s such a gloomy Gus, always seeing the worst in every situation.”
  • In a conversation about a disappointing outcome, someone might comment, “I hate to be a gloomy Gus, but I don’t think things will get better.”

25. Debbie Downer

A Debbie Downer is similar to a gloomy Gus, but the term is often used to describe someone who consistently brings negativity to a group or social setting. It is often used humorously to lighten the mood.

  • For example, “She’s such a Debbie Downer, always pointing out the flaws in everyone’s plans.”
  • A person might say, “We need to avoid being a Debbie Downer and focus on the positive.”
  • In a conversation about a joyful event, someone might jokingly say, “Don’t be a Debbie Downer and ruin the fun!”

26. Eeyore

This term refers to someone who is constantly negative or pessimistic, often in a gloomy or sullen manner. It is derived from the character Eeyore from Winnie the Pooh, who is known for his downcast and gloomy outlook.

  • For example, “Stop being such an Eeyore and try to see the bright side.”
  • A person might say, “I feel like Eeyore today, everything seems to be going wrong.”
  • Another might comment, “She’s always so Eeyore about everything, it’s exhausting to be around.”

27. Bleak

This term describes a situation or mood that is lacking in hope or optimism, often characterized by a feeling of emptiness or despair. It can also refer to a place or environment that is desolate or dreary.

  • For instance, “The outlook for the economy is looking bleak.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling really bleak about my future right now.”
  • Another might comment, “The weather today is so bleak, it matches my mood.”

28. Crestfallen

This term describes someone who is extremely disappointed or disheartened, often as a result of a setback or failure. It conveys a sense of defeat or sadness.

  • For example, “She looked crestfallen when she didn’t get the job.”
  • A person might say, “I felt crestfallen when I realized I had lost my wallet.”
  • Another might comment, “His crestfallen expression spoke volumes about his defeat.”

29. Disconsolate

This term describes someone who is extremely sad or unhappy, often to the point of feeling hopeless or inconsolable. It conveys a sense of profound sorrow or grief.

  • For instance, “She was disconsolate after the loss of her loved one.”
  • A person might say, “I felt disconsolate when I received the news.”
  • Another might comment, “The disconsolate look on his face broke my heart.”

30. Forlorn

This term describes someone who is feeling lonely, abandoned, or neglected, often resulting in a sense of sadness or despair. It can also refer to a place or object that appears empty or deserted.

  • For example, “He had a forlorn expression as he watched everyone else celebrate.”
  • A person might say, “I feel forlorn in this empty house.”
  • Another might comment, “The forlorn playground was a stark reminder of happier times.”

31. Hangdog

This term refers to someone who looks downcast or defeated, often with a drooping or hangdog expression.

  • For example, “He walked into the room with a hangdog expression, clearly upset about something.”
  • Someone might describe a person as “having a hangdog look” after receiving bad news.
  • In a discussion about body language, a participant might say, “A hangdog expression can indicate feelings of shame or guilt.”

32. Long-faced

This term describes someone who appears sad or serious, usually with a long or elongated face.

  • For instance, “She came out of the meeting looking long-faced, so I knew it didn’t go well.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Don’t make such a long-faced expression. It’s not the end of the world.”
  • In a conversation about emotions, someone might say, “I can’t help but feel long-faced when I think about the state of the world.”

33. Sullen-faced

This term describes someone who has a gloomy or sulky expression on their face, indicating a sullen mood or attitude.

  • For example, “He sat in the corner, sullen-faced and refusing to join in the conversation.”
  • A parent might scold their child, “Wipe that sullen-faced look off your face and cheer up.”
  • In a discussion about nonverbal communication, someone might explain, “A sullen-faced expression can convey feelings of anger or resentment.”

34. Downcast

This term describes someone who is looking downward or depressed, often with a lowered gaze or a drooping facial expression.

  • For instance, “She walked with a downcast gaze, lost in her own thoughts.”
  • A friend might notice and ask, “Why do you look so downcast today?”
  • In a conversation about body language, a participant might say, “A downcast expression can indicate feelings of sadness or shame.”

35. Dismal

This term refers to something that is gloomy, depressing, or lacking in hope or brightness.

  • For example, “The weather outside was dismal, with dark clouds and constant rain.”
  • A person might describe a situation as “dismal” when everything seems to be going wrong.
  • In a discussion about mood, someone might say, “I woke up feeling so dismal today, I can’t shake off this sadness.”

36. Grouchy

This word describes someone who is easily annoyed or in a bad mood. It suggests a general sense of grumpiness or dissatisfaction.

  • For example, “Don’t talk to him right now, he’s feeling grouchy.”
  • A person might say, “I woke up on the wrong side of the bed and have been feeling grouchy all day.”
  • Another might comment, “She’s always so grouchy in the mornings, it’s best to give her some space.”

37. Melancholy

This word refers to a deep and prolonged sadness or a feeling of gloom. It suggests a sense of longing or nostalgia.

  • For instance, “He couldn’t shake off the melancholy that settled over him after the breakup.”
  • A person might say, “I often feel a sense of melancholy when I think about my childhood.”
  • Another might comment, “The rainy weather always brings out a sense of melancholy in me.”

38. Pensive

This word describes someone who is deep in thought or lost in contemplation. It suggests a reflective or introspective state of mind.

  • For example, “She sat by the window, pensive and lost in her own thoughts.”
  • A person might say, “I often become pensive when I’m alone in nature.”
  • Another might comment, “He had a pensive expression on his face, as if he was pondering something important.”

39. Churlish

This word refers to someone who is ill-mannered or surly in behavior. It suggests a lack of politeness or consideration for others.

  • For instance, “His churlish remarks offended everyone in the room.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t stand her churlish attitude, she’s always so disrespectful.”
  • Another might comment, “The customer’s churlish behavior towards the waiter was completely uncalled for.”

40. Gruff

This word describes someone who is rough or brusque in manner. It suggests a curt or blunt way of speaking.

  • For example, “He answered the phone with a gruff tone.”
  • A person might say, “The teacher’s gruff instructions intimidated the students.”
  • Another might comment, “The security guard’s gruff demeanor made it clear that he didn’t want to be bothered.”

41. Dolesome

Dolesome is a term used to describe someone or something that is sad or filled with sorrow. It is often used to convey a sense of melancholy or gloominess.

  • For example, “She had a dolesome expression on her face.”
  • A person might say, “The dolesome weather matched my mood.”
  • Another might describe a movie as, “It was a dolesome film that left me feeling somber.”

42. Lugubrious

Lugubrious is an adjective used to describe something that is mournful or excessively sad. It often conveys a sense of deep sorrow or grief.

  • For instance, “He delivered the eulogy in a lugubrious tone.”
  • A person might say, “The lugubrious music perfectly captured the mood of the scene.”
  • Another might describe a painting as, “The artist used dark colors to create a lugubrious atmosphere.”

43. Doleful

Doleful is an adjective that describes something or someone as being sad or mournful. It is often used to convey a sense of deep sadness or sorrow.

  • For example, “She had a doleful expression on her face.”
  • A person might say, “The doleful music brought tears to my eyes.”
  • Another might describe a rainy day as, “The gray clouds created a doleful atmosphere.”

44. Stark

Stark is an adjective that describes something as being harsh or severe. It is often used to convey a sense of bleakness or austerity.

  • For instance, “The stark landscape was devoid of any signs of life.”
  • A person might say, “The stark reality of the situation hit me hard.”
  • Another might describe a room as, “The stark white walls gave the space a cold and impersonal feel.”

45. Dreary

Dreary is an adjective that describes something as being dull, gloomy, or depressing. It is often used to convey a sense of monotony or sadness.

  • For example, “The dreary weather matched my mood.”
  • A person might say, “The dreary office environment made it difficult to stay motivated.”
  • Another might describe a book as, “The author painted a dreary picture of life in the small town.”
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