Top 31 Slang For Supervisor – Meaning & Usage

Ever wondered how to talk about your boss in a cool way? Look no further! We’ve gathered the trendiest slang for supervisors that will make you the office slang expert in no time. Say goodbye to boring terms and hello to a whole new level of workplace vocabulary. Let’s dive in and upgrade your lingo game!

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1. Bossman

A term used to refer to a supervisor or manager, indicating their authority and leadership position. “Bossman” is a slang term that conveys a sense of respect or familiarity towards the supervisor.

  • For example, an employee might say, “I need to check with the bossman before taking time off.”
  • In a conversation about work, someone might mention, “The bossman wants us to finish this project by Friday.”
  • A colleague might ask, “Have you talked to the bossman about the new policy?”

This term refers to the person who holds the highest position of authority in an organization or team. “Head Honcho” is a playful and informal way to refer to a supervisor or manager.

  • For instance, during a team meeting, someone might say, “Let’s get the approval from the head honcho before proceeding.”
  • In a discussion about promotions, a coworker might mention, “The head honcho has the final say on who gets promoted.”
  • A team member might jokingly say, “We better impress the head honcho with our presentation.”

3. Big Cheese

This slang term is used to describe a supervisor or manager who holds a significant amount of power or influence within an organization. “Big Cheese” implies that the supervisor is an important figure in the hierarchy.

  • For example, during a company event, someone might say, “Let’s make sure the big cheese is impressed with our performance.”
  • In a conversation about decision-making, a colleague might mention, “The big cheese will have the final say on this matter.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Have you spoken to the big cheese about our team’s concerns?”

4. Top Dog

This term refers to the supervisor or manager who holds the highest position of authority within a team or organization. “Top Dog” implies that the supervisor is at the top of the hierarchy and has significant control and influence.

  • For instance, during a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s present our ideas to the top dog and get their feedback.”
  • In a discussion about promotions, a coworker might mention, “The top dog has the final say on who gets promoted.”
  • A team member might ask, “What’s the top dog’s opinion on our new project?”

5. Chief

This term is used to refer to a supervisor or manager who is in charge of a particular department or team. “Chief” is a more casual and friendly way to address a supervisor, highlighting their role as a leader.

  • For example, during a team meeting, someone might say, “We need to discuss this with the chief and get their input.”
  • In a conversation about team dynamics, a coworker might mention, “The chief plays a crucial role in motivating the team.”
  • A team member might ask, “Have you talked to the chief about our upcoming project?”

6. Captain

In a work setting, a “captain” is a term used informally to refer to a supervisor or manager. This slang term is often used to describe someone who is in charge or has authority over a team or department.

  • For example, a coworker might say, “I need to check with the captain before making any decisions.”
  • In a meeting, someone might ask, “What does the captain think about this proposal?”
  • A team member might say, “The captain gave us new instructions for the project.”

7. Director

In the workplace, a “director” is a slang term used to refer to a supervisor or manager who is in charge of a department or division. This term is often used to describe someone who has a high level of authority and responsibility.

  • For instance, an employee might say, “I need to discuss this issue with the director before proceeding.”
  • In a conversation about management, someone might mention, “The director sets the overall strategy for the company.”
  • A team member might say, “The director gave us clear goals for the upcoming quarter.”

8. Manager

In a professional setting, a “manager” is a common slang term used to refer to a supervisor or person in charge. This term is often used to describe someone who oversees a team or department and is responsible for making decisions and giving instructions.

  • For example, an employee might say, “I need to check with the manager before taking any time off.”
  • In a discussion about work responsibilities, someone might mention, “The manager is responsible for ensuring the team meets its goals.”
  • A coworker might say, “The manager wants us to have a meeting to discuss the new project.”

9. Lead

In a work environment, a “lead” is a slang term used to refer to a supervisor or person in charge of a team. This term is often used to describe someone who is responsible for guiding and coordinating the work of a group of employees.

  • For instance, a team member might say, “I need to check with the lead before making any changes.”
  • In a conversation about team dynamics, someone might mention, “The lead plays a crucial role in motivating and supporting the team.”
  • A coworker might say, “The lead has assigned me a new project to work on.”

In a professional setting, “head” is a slang term used to refer to a supervisor or person in charge. This term is often used to describe someone who is at the top of a hierarchy or has authority over a department or organization.

  • For example, an employee might say, “I need to discuss this issue with the head of the department.”
  • In a conversation about management structure, someone might mention, “The head of the company sets the overall direction and vision.”
  • A team member might say, “The head has given us a deadline for completing the project.”

11. Chief Executive

The term “Chief Executive” is often used to refer to the highest-ranking executive in a company or organization. The term can also be used informally to describe someone who is in charge or has authority over others.

  • For example, in a corporate setting, someone might say, “I need to check with the Chief Executive before making a decision.”
  • In a more casual context, a person might say, “The Chief Executive of this household is my mom.”
  • A group of friends might jokingly refer to the person organizing their plans as the “Chief Executive Officer of Fun.”
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12. Supervisor

A “Supervisor” is someone who oversees and directs the work of others, ensuring that tasks are completed efficiently and effectively. The term is often used in a professional or work context.

  • For instance, in a retail setting, a supervisor might say, “I need you to restock the shelves.”
  • In an office, a supervisor might provide feedback on an employee’s performance, saying, “You need to improve your attention to detail.”
  • A person might talk about their supervisor, saying, “My manager is really supportive and helps me grow in my role.”

13. Foreman

A “Foreman” is a person who supervises and oversees a group of workers, typically in a construction or manufacturing setting. The term can also be used more broadly to describe someone who is in charge or has authority over others.

  • For example, on a construction site, a foreman might say, “We need to finish pouring the concrete by the end of the day.”
  • In a factory, a foreman might assign tasks to workers, saying, “You’ll be responsible for operating the machinery.”
  • A person might refer to their boss as a foreman, saying, “My foreman is tough but fair.”

14. Team Lead

A “Team Lead” is someone who is responsible for leading and managing a team of individuals. The term is often used in a professional or work context, particularly in project-based or collaborative environments.

  • For instance, in a software development team, a team lead might say, “Let’s divide the tasks and assign them to each team member.”
  • In a marketing department, a team lead might provide guidance on a campaign, saying, “We need to target our messaging to a younger demographic.”
  • A person might discuss their manager, saying, “My team lead is really supportive and helps us stay organized.”

15. Overlord

While not a commonly used term in professional settings, “Overlord” can be used informally to describe someone who has complete control or authority over others. The term is often used in a humorous or exaggerated manner.

  • For example, in a group of friends planning a trip, someone might playfully say, “Our overlord has spoken, we must all wear matching t-shirts.”
  • In a video game context, a player might refer to a powerful enemy character as the “overlord” they need to defeat.
  • A person might jokingly refer to their parent as their “overlord” when asked about their household rules.
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16. Commander

A term used to refer to a person who is in charge or has authority over others. “Commander” is often used in a military or hierarchical context.

  • For example, a soldier might say, “The commander gave us strict orders to hold our position.”
  • In a workplace setting, someone might say, “I need to check with the commander before making any decisions.”
  • A team member might ask, “When will the commander be available for a meeting?”

17. Chief Officer

A colloquial term used to describe the highest-ranking officer or executive in an organization. The “chief officer” is typically responsible for making important decisions and overseeing the overall operations.

  • For instance, during a company meeting, someone might say, “Let’s hear from the chief officer on this matter.”
  • In a conversation about leadership, someone might mention, “The chief officer sets the strategic direction for the company.”
  • A colleague might ask, “Have you spoken to the top dog about our project?”

18. Headmaster

A term used to refer to the person in charge of a school or educational institution. The “headmaster” holds a position of authority and is responsible for managing the staff and students.

  • For example, a student might say, “The headmaster called me into his office to discuss my behavior.”
  • During a faculty meeting, a teacher might say, “Let’s bring this issue to the attention of the head honcho.”
  • A parent might ask, “Is the headmaster available to discuss my child’s progress?”

19. Principal

A commonly used term to describe the person who is in charge of a school or educational institution. The “principal” is responsible for overseeing the daily operations and ensuring a safe and productive learning environment.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “I need to check with the big cheese before scheduling a field trip.”
  • In a conversation about school policies, someone might mention, “The principal has the final say in disciplinary matters.”
  • A student might ask, “Can I speak to the principal about changing my schedule?”

20. Superintendent

A term used to refer to the person who is in charge of a particular area or organization. The “superintendent” typically holds a high-ranking position and has authority over multiple subordinates or departments.

  • For example, in a construction project, someone might say, “The superintendent is responsible for coordinating all the different teams.”
  • During a city council meeting, a citizen might ask, “Can the top brass provide an update on the road construction plans?”
  • A colleague might say, “Let’s bring this matter to the attention of the superintendent.”

21. Warden

A warden is someone who oversees and manages a group of people or a specific area. The term “warden” is often used to refer to a supervisor or boss, especially in a more authoritative or strict sense.

  • For example, in a prison setting, the warden is the highest-ranking official who manages the facility and its staff.
  • In a workplace, a warden might be someone who monitors and enforces rules and regulations.
  • A person might say, “I need to speak with the warden about this issue.”

22. Master

When used in the context of a supervisor, “master” refers to someone who is at the top or in charge. It implies a high level of expertise and authority.

  • For instance, in martial arts, a master is someone who has achieved a high level of skill and knowledge in a particular discipline.
  • In a professional setting, a master might be someone who is highly experienced and respected in their field.
  • A person might say, “I am fortunate to have a master who guides and supports me.”

23. Team Leader

A team leader is someone who is responsible for guiding and coordinating a group of individuals towards a common goal. The term “team leader” is often used interchangeably with “captain” in the context of a supervisor.

  • For example, in sports, the team leader or captain is someone who represents the team and provides guidance on the field.
  • In a workplace, a team leader might be someone who oversees a specific group or department and ensures that tasks are completed efficiently.
  • A person might say, “Our team leader is great at motivating and organizing us.”

24. Kingpin

A kingpin is someone who holds a position of power and influence, often in an illicit or criminal organization. In the context of a supervisor, “kingpin” is used colloquially to refer to someone who is the top authority or decision-maker.

  • For instance, in a business setting, a kingpin might be a CEO or high-ranking executive who holds significant control over the company.
  • In a group project, a person might say, “Let’s check with the kingpin before making any major changes.”
  • A person discussing organizational structure might mention, “The kingpin sets the direction and strategy for the entire company.”

25. Bigwig

A bigwig is someone who holds a high-ranking or influential position in a particular organization or group. In the context of a supervisor, “bigwig” is used informally to refer to someone who is important or powerful.

  • For example, in a government setting, a bigwig might be a high-ranking official or politician.
  • In a corporate setting, a bigwig might be someone in a top-level management position.
  • A person might say, “I have a meeting with the bigwig later today.”

26. Top Brass

This term refers to the highest-ranking individuals in an organization or group, often used in a military context. “Top Brass” can also be used to describe someone who is in a position of authority or power.

  • For example, “The top brass of the company made the final decision.”
  • In a military setting, someone might say, “The top brass will be visiting our base next week.”
  • A person discussing a government organization might mention, “The top brass is responsible for making important policy decisions.”

This term refers to the person who is in charge of overseeing and managing the daily operations of a business or organization. The “Head of Operations” is responsible for ensuring that everything runs smoothly and efficiently.

  • For instance, “The head of operations is responsible for coordinating all the different departments.”
  • In a meeting, someone might ask, “Can the head of operations provide an update on the current projects?”
  • A person discussing a successful company might say, “The head of operations plays a crucial role in keeping things running smoothly.”

This term refers to the person who is in charge of a specific department within a company or organization. The “Head of Department” is responsible for managing the department’s activities and ensuring its success.

  • For example, “The head of the marketing department is responsible for developing and implementing marketing strategies.”
  • In a discussion about organizational structure, someone might say, “Each department has its own head of department who reports to the CEO.”
  • A person discussing a promotion might mention, “I’m aiming to become the head of my department in the next few years.”

29. Executive Director

This term refers to a senior-level position within an organization or company. The “Executive Director” is responsible for overseeing the overall operations and making strategic decisions.

  • For instance, “The executive director is responsible for setting the organization’s vision and goals.”
  • In a non-profit organization, someone might say, “The executive director is responsible for fundraising and managing the day-to-day operations.”
  • A person discussing corporate governance might mention, “The executive director is accountable to the board of directors.”

30. Boss man

This term is an informal way to refer to a male supervisor or boss. “Boss man” is often used in a casual or colloquial setting.

  • For example, “I need to check with the boss man before I can approve your request.”
  • In a conversation among coworkers, someone might say, “The boss man wants us to finish the project by the end of the week.”
  • A person discussing their work environment might mention, “The boss man is strict but fair in his expectations.”

31. Chairman

The chairman is the person who presides over a meeting or a group. They are typically in charge of making decisions and leading discussions. The term “head honcho” is a slang term used to refer to someone who is in a position of authority or leadership.

  • For example, in a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s hear from the chairman on this matter.”
  • In a casual conversation about work, someone might ask, “Who’s the head honcho in your department?”
  • A person discussing a company’s leadership might comment, “The chairman plays a crucial role in setting the direction of the organization.”