Top 27 Slang For Supported – Meaning & Usage

Feeling lost in a sea of modern lingo? We’ve got your back with a curated list of the latest and most popular slang for feeling supported. From phrases that lift you up to words that have your back, we’ve got you covered. Dive in and stay ahead of the curve with our guide to the top slang for feeling supported.

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1. Propped up

To prop something up means to provide support or assistance to keep it from falling or failing. In slang terms, “propped up” refers to providing support or assistance to someone or something.

  • For example, “The government propped up the failing company with a bailout.”
  • In a discussion about a struggling sports team, someone might say, “They need a new coach to prop them up.”
  • A person talking about a friend’s difficult situation might say, “I’m doing everything I can to prop them up.”

2. Upheld

To uphold something means to maintain or defend it, often in the face of opposition or criticism. In slang terms, “upheld” refers to supporting or defending someone or something.

  • For instance, “The lawyer skillfully upheld the client’s innocence in court.”
  • In a conversation about an unpopular opinion, someone might say, “I’ll uphold my belief, even if it’s not popular.”
  • A person discussing a controversial decision might argue, “The judge’s ruling upheld the integrity of the justice system.”

3. Boosted

To boost something means to increase or elevate it, often in a positive or beneficial way. In slang terms, “boosted” refers to supporting or promoting someone or something to help them succeed.

  • For example, “The celebrity’s endorsement boosted the sales of the product.”
  • In a discussion about a struggling artist, someone might say, “Let’s boost their social media presence to get more exposure.”
  • A person talking about a friend’s career might say, “I’ll do whatever I can to boost their chances of success.”

4. Bolstered

To bolster something means to strengthen or reinforce it, often to provide support or stability. In slang terms, “bolstered” refers to supporting or strengthening someone or something.

  • For instance, “The team’s win bolstered their confidence for the next game.”
  • In a conversation about a struggling project, someone might say, “Let’s bring in more resources to bolster its chances of success.”
  • A person discussing a friend’s self-esteem might say, “We should give them compliments to bolster their confidence.”

5. Shored up

To shore up something means to stabilize or secure it, often to prevent it from collapsing or failing. In slang terms, “shored up” refers to supporting or securing someone or something.

  • For example, “The government shored up the economy with stimulus packages.”
  • In a discussion about a risky investment, someone might say, “Diversify your portfolio to shore up your finances.”
  • A person talking about a friend going through a tough time might say, “We’ll be there to shore them up and provide emotional support.”

6. Backed

This term means to support or endorse someone or something. It can be used to show agreement or solidarity with a person or cause.

  • For example, “I backed my friend’s decision to quit their job and pursue their passion.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “I backed the candidate who promised to improve healthcare.”
  • A fan might say, “I’ve always backed this team, through the wins and losses.”

7. Stood up for

To stand up for someone means to support or defend them, especially in a difficult or challenging situation.

  • For instance, “I stood up for my coworker when they were being unfairly criticized.”
  • In a bullying scenario, someone might say, “I always stand up for those who are being mistreated.”
  • A friend might say, “I will always stand up for you, no matter what.”

8. Backed by

When something or someone is backed by someone, it means they have the support or endorsement of that person.

  • For example, “The new product launch was backed by a well-known celebrity.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “Our proposal is backed by extensive market research.”
  • A musician might say, “I feel confident knowing that my music is backed by a talented team.”

9. Got behind

To get behind something means to support or endorse it. It implies a willingness to stand by and champion a person, cause, or idea.

  • For instance, “I got behind my friend’s decision to start their own business.”
  • In a social movement, someone might say, “I got behind the movement for racial equality.”
  • A fan might say, “I will always get behind this team, no matter what.”

10. Stood by

To stand by someone means to support or remain loyal to them, especially during challenging times.

  • For example, “I stood by my friend when they were going through a difficult breakup.”
  • In a legal context, someone might say, “I will stand by you as your attorney throughout this case.”
  • A partner might say, “I will always stand by you, no matter what.”

11. Gave them props

This phrase is used to acknowledge someone’s accomplishments or actions and show support or admiration for them.

  • For example, “I gave them props for acing their exam.”
  • A person might say, “I have to give them props for their hard work and dedication.”
  • Another might comment, “I gave them props for standing up for what they believe in.”

12. Cheered on

This phrase is used to express support and encouragement for someone’s actions or endeavors.

  • For instance, “I cheered on my friend during the marathon.”
  • A person might say, “I always cheer on my favorite team during their games.”
  • Another might comment, “I cheered on my sister as she gave her presentation.”

13. Lifted up

This phrase is used to describe the act of offering emotional support or encouragement to someone.

  • For example, “I lifted them up when they were feeling down.”
  • A person might say, “I try to lift up my friends when they’re going through tough times.”
  • Another might comment, “I lifted them up with words of encouragement before their big performance.”

14. Got their back

This phrase is used to indicate that one is there to support, protect, or defend someone.

  • For instance, “I’ve always got their back, no matter what.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll always have your back in any situation.”
  • Another might comment, “I’ve got their back and will stand up for them if anyone tries to bring them down.”

15. Stood shoulder to shoulder

This phrase is used to describe standing together in support, unity, or solidarity with someone.

  • For example, “We stood shoulder to shoulder in the fight for justice.”
  • A person might say, “We will stand shoulder to shoulder with our allies.”
  • Another might comment, “We stood shoulder to shoulder to show our support for the cause.”

16. Brought up

When someone brings you up, they are speaking in your defense or support. It can also mean to mention someone or something in a conversation.

  • For example, “She brought up her friend’s achievements during the debate.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I brought up the counterargument to provide a different perspective.”
  • When defending a friend, you might say, “I brought up all the times they helped me in the past.”

17. Stuck up for

To stick up for someone means to support or defend them, especially in a challenging situation.

  • For instance, “She stuck up for her sister when she was being bullied.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I stuck up for my beliefs and presented my arguments.”
  • When someone is being unfairly criticized, you might say, “I stuck up for them and called out the unfairness.”

18. Bailed out

Bailing someone out means to provide support or assistance when they are in trouble or facing a challenging situation.

  • For example, “He bailed out his friend by lending him money to pay off a debt.”
  • When someone needs help, you might say, “I’ll bail you out of this mess.”
  • In a tough situation, someone might ask for help by saying, “Can you bail me out of this predicament?”

19. Had your back

When someone has your back, they are there to support and defend you, especially when you need it the most.

  • For instance, “He always has my back in any argument or disagreement.”
  • In a conflict, someone might say, “I know my team has my back, so I feel confident.”
  • When facing a difficult situation, you might ask someone, “Can you have my back and support me?”

20. Backed you up

To back someone up means to support or defend them, especially in a situation where their actions, decisions, or opinions are being challenged.

  • For example, “She backed me up when I made a controversial statement.”
  • In a disagreement, someone might say, “I’ll back you up on this issue.”
  • When someone needs support, you might offer by saying, “I’ll back you up in whatever you decide.”

21. Rooted

When someone is “rooted,” it means they are firmly and unwaveringly supported in their beliefs, actions, or decisions. This term is often used to describe someone who stands up for what they believe in and doesn’t back down.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m rooted in my decision to pursue my dreams, no matter what others say.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might assert, “I’m rooted in my belief that everyone deserves equal rights.”
  • A friend might offer encouragement by saying, “Stay rooted in your values and don’t let anyone sway you.”

22. Stood up

To “stand up” for someone means to support and defend them, especially in a difficult or challenging situation. This term is often used when someone is being treated unfairly or facing criticism.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I stood up for my friend when they were being bullied.”
  • In a workplace scenario, someone might assert, “I won’t tolerate discrimination and will always stand up for what’s right.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “I’ll always stand up for you and protect you from harm.”

23. Backed off

When someone “backs off,” it means they withdraw or retract their support for a person, idea, or action. This term is often used when someone initially supported something but later changes their stance.

  • For example, a person might say, “I backed off from supporting that political candidate after learning about their controversial actions.”
  • In a debate, someone might admit, “I initially supported the idea, but after hearing the opposing arguments, I’ve backed off.”
  • A friend might express disappointment by saying, “I thought you were on my side, but you backed off when things got tough.”

24. Stood firm

To “stand firm” means to remain steadfast and unwavering in one’s support for something or someone. This term is often used when someone faces opposition or challenges to their beliefs or decisions.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I stood firm in my decision to pursue my passion, despite others’ doubts.”
  • In a political context, someone might assert, “We must stand firm in our commitment to equality and justice.”
  • A coach might encourage their team by saying, “Stay focused and stand firm in your support for each other.”

25. Backed out

When someone “backs out,” it means they withdraw or retract their support for a person, idea, or action. This term is often used when someone initially agreed to support something but later changes their mind or fails to follow through.

  • For example, a person might say, “I backed out of supporting the event because of scheduling conflicts.”
  • In a group project, someone might admit, “I initially agreed to help, but I backed out due to personal reasons.”
  • A friend might express frustration by saying, “You said you would support me, but you backed out at the last minute.”

26. Stood up to

This phrase means to confront or resist someone or something that is causing harm or injustice. It implies taking a stand and not backing down.

  • For example, “She stood up to her boss when he tried to take credit for her work.”
  • In a discussion about standing up to bullying, someone might say, “It’s important for victims to stand up to their bullies and seek help.”
  • A person might encourage a friend by saying, “Don’t let anyone push you around. Stand up to them and assert yourself.”

27. Held accountable

This phrase means to be held responsible or answerable for one’s actions, decisions, or behavior. It implies facing the consequences of one’s actions.

  • For instance, “The company was held accountable for the environmental damage caused by their operations.”
  • In a discussion about ethics in politics, someone might say, “Politicians should be held accountable for their promises.”
  • A person might argue, “Parents need to hold their children accountable for their behavior and teach them about consequences.”
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