Top 32 Slang For Surround – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to describing your surroundings in a cool and trendy way, knowing the latest slang for surround is key. Whether you’re trying to impress your friends or simply stay up-to-date with the language of the moment, we’ve got you covered. Join us as we unveil a list of the most hip and happening slang terms that will take your descriptive game to the next level. Get ready to elevate your vocabulary and stand out from the crowd!

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1. Encircle

This term is often used to describe the act of surrounding or enclosing someone or something in a circular or ring-like manner.

  • For example, “The soldiers encircled the enemy camp to cut off their escape.”
  • In a discussion about strategy, someone might say, “We need to encircle our opponents to gain the advantage.”
  • A nature enthusiast might describe a scene by saying, “The mountains encircle the serene valley.”

2. Encompass

This term refers to the act of completely surrounding or including something or someone.

  • For instance, “The painting encompasses a wide range of emotions.”
  • In a conversation about a city, someone might say, “The city’s culture and diversity encompass a variety of perspectives.”
  • A writer might describe a character by saying, “Her personality encompasses both strength and vulnerability.”

3. Besiege

This term is often used to describe the act of surrounding a place with armed forces in order to capture it or force its surrender.

  • For example, “The army besieged the castle, cutting off all supply routes.”
  • In a discussion about historical events, someone might mention, “The city was besieged for months before finally surrendering.”
  • A journalist might report, “The protesters besieged the government building, demanding change.”

4. Enfold

This term describes the act of surrounding or wrapping someone or something in a warm, secure embrace.

  • For instance, “The mother gently enfolded her child in a loving hug.”
  • In a conversation about comfort, someone might say, “The soft blankets enfolded me, making me feel safe and cozy.”
  • A poet might write, “The moonlight enfolded the night in its gentle glow.”

5. Enshroud

This term is often used to describe the act of completely covering or surrounding something with a dark or mysterious quality.

  • For example, “The fog enshrouded the forest, making it feel eerie and mysterious.”
  • In a discussion about secrets, someone might say, “The truth is enshrouded in mystery.”
  • A writer might describe a scene by saying, “The old mansion was enshrouded in darkness as the storm raged outside.”

6. Environ

This word is used to describe the surrounding environment or circumstances. It refers to the conditions or elements that surround a person or thing.

  • For example, “I love the peaceful environ of the countryside.”
  • In a discussion about urban planning, one might say, “We need to consider the environ when designing new buildings.”
  • A nature enthusiast might comment, “The beautiful environ of the national park is worth exploring.”

7. Girdle

To girdle means to encircle or surround something completely. It can be used metaphorically to describe the act of surrounding or encompassing something.

  • For instance, “The city is girdled by a ring of mountains.”
  • In a conversation about protecting the environment, one might say, “We must girdle our actions with sustainable practices.”
  • A writer might describe a character’s determination by saying, “She girdled herself with courage and faced her fears.”

8. Embrace

To embrace means to hold someone or something tightly in one’s arms, often as a gesture of affection or support. It can also be used metaphorically to describe accepting or welcoming something.

  • For example, “She ran towards her friend and embraced him in a warm hug.”
  • In a discussion about diversity, one might say, “We should embrace different cultures and celebrate their contributions.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage the audience by saying, “Embrace challenges as opportunities for growth.”

9. Envelop

To envelop means to wrap or cover something completely, often in a way that surrounds or encloses it.

  • For instance, “The fog enveloped the entire city, creating an eerie atmosphere.”
  • In a conversation about communication, one might say, “Her words were enveloped in kindness and understanding.”
  • A poet might describe the night by saying, “The darkness enveloped the world in its mysterious embrace.”

10. Encase

To encase means to cover or surround something completely, typically by placing it inside a protective or decorative case.

  • For example, “The fragile item was encased in bubble wrap to prevent damage during shipping.”
  • In a discussion about technology, one might say, “The smartphone is encased in a sleek and durable design.”
  • An art collector might describe a valuable painting by saying, “The masterpiece is encased in a custom-made frame to preserve its beauty.”

11. Engulf

To completely surround or cover something or someone.

  • For example, “The waves engulfed the boat, causing it to capsize.”
  • In a figurative sense, one might say, “I was engulfed by a feeling of sadness.”
  • A person describing a crowded concert might say, “The crowd engulfed me as soon as I stepped into the venue.”

12. Enwreathe

To encircle or surround something or someone with a wreath or similar decoration.

  • For instance, “The bride’s hair was enwreathed with flowers.”
  • During the holiday season, people might enwreathe their front doors with garlands and lights.
  • A person might say, “I enwreathe my Christmas tree with ornaments and tinsel every year.”

13. Enwind

To wrap or coil something around an object or person.

  • For example, “The snake enwound itself around the tree branch.”
  • In a romantic context, one might say, “He enwound his arms around her waist.”
  • A person might describe a winding road by saying, “The road enwinds through the mountains, offering breathtaking views.”

14. Encage

To confine or trap someone or something in a cage.

  • For instance, “The zoo encages wild animals to ensure visitor safety.”
  • In a metaphorical sense, one might say, “I feel encaged by my responsibilities.”
  • A person might describe a prison by saying, “The inmates are encaged behind bars.”

15. Enwall

To enclose or surround something with walls.

  • For example, “The castle was enwalled to protect its inhabitants.”
  • In a construction context, one might say, “We enwall the building to create separate rooms.”
  • A person might describe a fortified city by saying, “The city is enwalled to defend against invaders.”

16. Enfetter

To bind or restrain someone or something, often in a metaphorical sense. “Enfetter” implies a sense of being trapped or confined.

  • For example, “I feel enfettered by my responsibilities at work.”
  • In a discussion about personal freedom, someone might say, “We must break free from the enfetters of societal expectations.”
  • A writer might use the term to describe a character’s emotional state, saying, “She felt enfettered by her past mistakes.”

17. Enframe

To surround or enclose something within a frame or structure. “Enframe” can also refer to the act of framing or presenting something in a particular way.

  • For instance, “The photograph was beautifully enframed, capturing the essence of the moment.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might say, “The artist used bold colors to enframe the subject and create a sense of depth.”
  • A filmmaker might describe their creative process, saying, “I carefully enframe each shot to evoke specific emotions in the audience.”

18. Enshrine

To treat something or someone with great respect or admiration, often by placing them in a position of honor or reverence. “Enshrine” implies a sense of sacredness or reverence.

  • For example, “The statue enshrines the memory of a great leader.”
  • In a discussion about traditions, someone might say, “We enshrine these customs to preserve our cultural heritage.”
  • A fan might describe their favorite celebrity, saying, “She is enshrined in the hearts of her fans.”

19. Enthrall

To hold someone’s attention or interest completely, often through a sense of fascination or enchantment. “Enthrall” implies a sense of being spellbound or deeply engaged.

  • For instance, “The magician’s performance enthralled the audience.”
  • In a discussion about literature, someone might say, “The novel’s gripping plot and vivid characters enthralled readers.”
  • A person might describe a captivating movie, saying, “The film’s stunning visuals and compelling story enthralled viewers.”

20. Enthrone

To install or establish someone as a ruler or leader, often with a sense of ceremony or formal recognition. “Enthrone” implies a sense of authority or power.

  • For example, “The new king was enthroned in a grand ceremony.”
  • In a discussion about leadership, someone might say, “It’s important to entrust capable individuals and enthrone them in positions of power.”
  • A historian might describe a significant moment in history, saying, “The revolution marked the end of monarchy and the enthronement of democracy.”

21. Enwrap

To enwrap means to completely enclose or surround something or someone. It is often used to describe the action of wrapping or enveloping.

  • For example, “The cozy blanket enwrapped the child, keeping them warm.”
  • In a romantic context, someone might say, “His love enwrapped her, making her feel safe and cherished.”
  • A writer might describe a scene as, “The mist enwrapped the forest, creating an eerie atmosphere.”

22. Enlace

Enlace refers to the act of joining or linking things together, often in a way that forms a continuous circle or loop.

  • For instance, “The chains enlaced the prisoner, keeping them secure.”
  • In a metaphorical sense, one might say, “Their destinies enlaced, forever bound together.”
  • A poet might use the term to describe the interweaving of emotions, saying, “Love and pain enlace in my heart.”

23. Hem in

Hem in means to surround or enclose someone or something closely, often with the intention of restricting movement or confining.

  • For example, “The protesters were hemmed in by police barricades.”
  • In a sports context, one might say, “The opposing team hemmed in the striker, preventing them from scoring.”
  • A person might feel trapped and say, “I feel hemmed in by all the responsibilities and expectations.”

24. Ring

To ring means to form a circle or surround something or someone, often in a way that creates a barrier or boundary.

  • For instance, “The crowd of fans ringed around the celebrity, hoping for an autograph.”
  • In a nature setting, one might say, “Mountains ringed the picturesque valley.”
  • A person might describe a protective gesture, saying, “She rang her arms around her child, shielding them from harm.”

25. Border

Border refers to the outer edge or boundary of something, often used to describe the line or area that separates one place from another.

  • For example, “The river borders the town, creating a natural border.”
  • In a political context, one might say, “The dispute arose due to conflicting border claims.”
  • A traveler might describe their journey, saying, “I crossed the border and entered a new country.”

26. Skirt

This slang term refers to surrounding or encircling something or someone. It can be used to describe physically surrounding someone or something, or metaphorically surrounding a situation or topic.

  • For example, “The police skirted the perimeter of the protest to maintain order.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial issue, one might say, “Let’s skirt around the topic and focus on finding a solution.”
  • Someone might use the term to describe a protective barrier, saying, “I need to skirt myself with positive people to avoid negativity.”

27. Wrap around

To wrap around means to completely enclose or surround something. It can be used to describe physically wrapping around an object, or metaphorically surrounding a person or situation.

  • For instance, “The snake wrapped around its prey before constricting.”
  • In a discussion about a challenging project, someone might say, “We need to wrap our minds around the problem and come up with a solution.”
  • A person might use the term to describe emotional support, saying, “My friends wrap around me during tough times.”

28. Engird

Engird is a slang term that means to surround or encircle something or someone. It is often used in a poetic or literary context to describe a physical or metaphorical surrounding.

  • For example, “The mountains engird the valley, creating a breathtaking view.”
  • In a conversation about a challenging situation, someone might say, “We need to engird ourselves with positive thoughts to overcome this.”
  • A person might use the term to describe a protective embrace, saying, “She engirded me with her love and support.”

29. Embosom

Embosom is a slang term that means to envelop or enclose something or someone. It is often used in a metaphorical or emotional context to describe a deep and intimate surrounding.

  • For instance, “I embosomed myself in nature to find peace.”
  • In a discussion about personal relationships, someone might say, “I embosom my loved ones with care and affection.”
  • A person might use the term to describe a comforting embrace, saying, “She embosomed me in her arms when I was feeling down.”

30. Enring

Enring is a slang term that means to form a ring around something or someone. It can be used to describe physically forming a circle or metaphorically surrounding a person or situation.

  • For example, “The audience enringed the performer, applauding enthusiastically.”
  • In a conversation about a central idea, someone might say, “All the evidence enringed the conclusion.”
  • A person might use the term to describe a supportive community, saying, “We enring each other with love and acceptance.”

31. Enfence

Enfence is a slang term used to describe the act of enclosing or surrounding an area with a fence or barrier. It can also refer to the state of being fenced in.

  • For example, “The farmer enfenced his property to keep out trespassers.”
  • In a conversation about backyard renovations, someone might say, “I’m planning to enfence my garden to keep the rabbits out.”
  • A person discussing privacy might mention, “Living in a neighborhood with enfenced yards provides a sense of security.”

32. Enshelter

Enshelter is a slang term used to describe the act of providing shelter or protection to someone or something. It can also refer to the state of being sheltered.

  • For instance, “The tree branches ensheltered the picnic area from the sun.”
  • In a discussion about homeless shelters, someone might say, “We need more organizations that enshelter those in need.”
  • A person talking about parenting might mention, “As parents, it’s our responsibility to enshelter our children from harm.”
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