Top 35 Slang For Talk – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to conversation, sometimes it can feel like everyone is speaking a different language. But fear not! We’ve got you covered with a list of the top slang for talk that will have you speaking like a pro in no time. From trendy phrases to popular expressions, we’ve compiled a comprehensive guide to help you navigate the ever-changing world of slang and impress your friends with your linguistic skills. So, get ready to level up your talk game and dive into this listicle!

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1. Chat

To engage in informal conversation or exchange messages online.

  • For example, “Let’s chat over coffee and catch up.”
  • In a chat room, someone might say, “Hey, can we chat privately?”
  • A person might ask, “Can we chat about this later?”

2. Chit-chat

To engage in light and casual conversation, often about unimportant or trivial matters.

  • For instance, “We just had some chit-chat about the weather.”
  • In a social gathering, one might say, “Let’s chit-chat and get to know each other.”
  • A person might comment, “I’m tired of chit-chat. Let’s have a meaningful conversation.”

3. Gab

To engage in lively and often prolonged conversation, typically with friends or acquaintances.

  • For example, “We gossiped and gabbed for hours.”
  • In a group setting, someone might say, “Let’s all gab and have a good time.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I love to gab with my best friend!”

4. Shoot the breeze

To engage in relaxed and informal conversation, often about unimportant or trivial matters.

  • For instance, “We sat on the porch and shot the breeze.”
  • In a casual setting, someone might say, “Let’s grab a drink and shoot the breeze.”
  • A person might comment, “I enjoy shooting the breeze with my coworkers during lunch.”

5. Chew the fat

To engage in friendly and leisurely conversation, typically about various topics.

  • For example, “We sat at the park and chewed the fat.”
  • In a social gathering, someone might say, “Let’s chew the fat and enjoy each other’s company.”
  • A person might suggest, “We should grab a coffee and chew the fat sometime.”

6. Shoot the bull

This phrase means to have a relaxed and informal conversation, often about unimportant or trivial matters. It can also refer to making small talk or engaging in idle chatter.

  • For example, friends might say, “Let’s get together and shoot the bull over a few beers.”
  • In a social gathering, someone might ask, “Anyone up for shooting the bull?”
  • At a party, a person might say, “I’m just here to shoot the bull and have a good time.”

7. Rap

To “rap” means to talk or have a conversation. It is often used in informal or urban settings to refer to a casual discussion or exchange of words.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Let’s sit down and rap about what’s been going on.”
  • In a group setting, a person might ask, “Who wants to rap about their weekend plans?”
  • A friend might say, “I need to rap with you about something important.”

8. Converse

To “converse” means to engage in a conversation or discuss something with someone. It implies a mutual exchange of ideas or thoughts.

  • For example, someone might say, “I enjoy conversing with people from different cultures.”
  • In a business setting, a colleague might ask, “Can we converse about the upcoming project?”
  • A teacher might encourage students to “converse with each other to practice their language skills.”

9. Jaw

To “jaw” means to talk or chat casually. It is often used to describe a relaxed and informal conversation, especially between friends or acquaintances.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Let’s sit on the porch and jaw for a while.”
  • In a social gathering, a person might ask, “Mind if I join your jaw session?”
  • Friends catching up might say, “We need to get together and jaw about our lives.”

10. Yap

To “yap” means to talk or chatter incessantly, often in a high-pitched or annoying manner. It can also refer to making loud or excessive noise.

  • For example, someone might say, “Stop yapping and let me concentrate.”
  • In a group setting, a person might comment, “She’s always yapping about something.”
  • A parent might scold their child, saying, “Quit yapping and do your homework.”

11. Shoot the shit

This phrase means to engage in informal or lighthearted conversation. It is often used to describe chatting or catching up with someone in a relaxed and casual manner.

  • For example, friends might say, “Let’s grab a coffee and shoot the shit.”
  • In a social setting, someone might ask, “Mind if I join you guys and shoot the shit?”
  • When catching up with a friend, you might say, “We need to get together and shoot the shit sometime.”

12. Spill the tea

This slang phrase means to reveal or share gossip or secrets. It is often used in a playful or dramatic way to discuss juicy information or rumors.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Girl, spill the tea! What’s the latest gossip?”
  • When someone shares a scandalous story, you might respond with, “Wow, you really spilled the tea on that one.”
  • In a conversation about celebrity news, someone might ask, “Has anyone spilled the tea on the new Hollywood couple?”

13. Spill the beans

This phrase means to disclose or reveal a secret or confidential information. It is often used when someone unintentionally or intentionally reveals something that was meant to be kept secret.

  • For example, if someone accidentally reveals a surprise party, you might say, “Way to spill the beans!”
  • When someone shares confidential information, you might ask, “Who spilled the beans?”
  • In a discussion about a leaked document, someone might comment, “Looks like someone spilled the beans on that one.”

14. Gas

In slang terms, “gas” refers to a lively or engaging conversation. It is often used to describe a conversation that is entertaining, interesting, or full of energy.

  • For instance, someone might say, “We had such a great gas last night, talking about our favorite movies.”
  • When someone shares an exciting story, you might respond with, “That’s pure gas!”
  • In a discussion about a thought-provoking topic, someone might comment, “This conversation is pure gas.”

15. Powwow

This term refers to a meeting or discussion, often among a group of people. It is derived from the Native American term for a council or gathering.

  • For example, in a work setting, someone might say, “Let’s have a powwow to discuss the upcoming project.”
  • When planning a social event, someone might ask, “Can we have a powwow to decide on the details?”
  • In a family setting, someone might suggest, “Let’s have a powwow to talk about our vacation plans.”

16. Run one’s mouth

This phrase refers to someone who talks a lot, often without considering the consequences or the impact of their words.

  • For example, “He needs to learn to stop running his mouth and start listening.”
  • In a disagreement, one person might accuse the other of “just running their mouth.”
  • A frustrated listener might say, “She never stops running her mouth, does she?”

17. Shoot the gift

This phrase means to have a friendly and informal conversation with someone.

  • For instance, “We sat on the porch and shot the gift for hours.”
  • Two friends might meet up and say, “Let’s grab a coffee and shoot the gift.”
  • During a break at work, colleagues might gather in the break room to shoot the gift.
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18. Schmooze

This term refers to the act of talking in a smooth and charming manner, often with the intention of gaining favor or networking.

  • For example, “He’s always schmoozing with the higher-ups to get ahead.”
  • During a business event, someone might say, “I need to schmooze with potential clients.”
  • A politician might schmooze with voters to gain their support.

19. Banter

Banter refers to the exchange of witty and humorous remarks between people in a casual and friendly manner.

  • For instance, “The group of friends engaged in playful banter throughout the evening.”
  • Two colleagues might engage in banter during a lunch break, joking with each other.
  • A couple might banter back and forth, teasing each other in a lighthearted way.

20. Gossip

Gossip involves sharing or discussing personal or sensational information about others, often without their knowledge or consent.

  • For example, “They love to gossip about their coworkers.”
  • In a group setting, someone might say, “Did you hear the latest gossip about our neighbors?”
  • A friend might confide, “I have some juicy gossip to share, but promise not to tell anyone.”

21. Natter

Natter is a slang term that refers to engaging in casual conversation or chatter. It often implies talking about unimportant or trivial matters.

  • For example, two friends might natter about their weekend plans.
  • In a workplace setting, colleagues might natter about the latest office gossip.
  • A person might say, “Let’s grab a cup of coffee and natter for a while.”

22. Blather

Blather is a slang term that means to talk in a foolish or nonsensical way. It implies speaking without making much sense or rambling.

  • For instance, someone might blather on about their dreams without any coherent thought.
  • During a heated argument, one person might accuse the other of blathering nonsense.
  • A person might say, “I can’t stand listening to him blather on about conspiracy theories.”

23. Prate

Prate is a slang term that means to talk at length in a foolish or inconsequential way. It implies speaking without much substance or talking about unimportant matters.

  • For example, someone might prate about their new shoes for hours.
  • During a boring lecture, a student might prate in order to pass the time.
  • A person might say, “Don’t mind her, she tends to prate about random things.”

24. Babbled

Babbled is a slang term that means to talk rapidly and incoherently. It implies speaking without much thought or making sense.

  • For instance, a person might babble when they’re nervous or anxious.
  • In a state of excitement, someone might babble about their favorite TV show without stopping.
  • A person might say, “I couldn’t understand a word he babbled, it was all gibberish.”

25. Mumble

Mumble is a slang term that means to speak in a low, unclear manner. It implies not enunciating words clearly or speaking softly.

  • For example, someone might mumble when they’re tired or not paying attention.
  • During a presentation, a nervous speaker might mumble their words.
  • A person might say, “Please speak up and stop mumbling, I can’t understand you.”

26. Jabber

Jabber refers to speaking quickly and often unintelligibly. It can imply a lack of clarity or coherence in one’s speech.

  • For example, “He jabbered on about his weekend adventures, but I couldn’t understand a word he said.”
  • In a conversation about a fast-talking salesperson, one might say, “She could jabber for hours and never get to the point.”
  • A parent might scold their child, “Stop jabbering and listen to what I’m saying!”

27. Gabble

Gabble is similar to jabber in that it describes speaking quickly and often incoherently. It implies a lack of clarity or articulation in one’s speech.

  • For instance, “She was so nervous that she started to gabble, and I couldn’t understand a word she was saying.”
  • In a discussion about someone who talks too much without making sense, one might say, “He tends to gabble on without realizing he’s not making any sense.”
  • A friend might tease another friend, “You gabble so much that sometimes I have no idea what you’re talking about!”

28. Rattle on

Rattle on means to talk for a long time or to talk excessively. It implies that the speaker is going on and on without considering the listener’s interest or engagement.

  • For example, “He rattled on about his favorite TV show for hours, even though I wasn’t interested.”
  • In a conversation about a boring lecturer, one might say, “He just rattles on and on, and it’s hard to stay focused.”
  • A person might complain, “My coworker always rattles on about her personal life, and it’s distracting me from my work!”

29. Prattle on

Prattle on means to talk in a foolish or inconsequential manner, often about trivial or unimportant things. It suggests that the speaker is speaking without much thought or substance.

  • For instance, “She prattled on about her new shoes, but I couldn’t care less.”
  • In a conversation about someone who talks a lot without saying anything important, one might say, “He tends to prattle on about random topics, and it’s hard to follow along.”
  • A person might comment, “I wish she would stop prattling on and get to the point already!”

30. Yammer

Yammer means to talk loudly or repetitively without much meaning or substance. It suggests that the speaker is speaking without purpose or clarity.

  • For example, “He yammered on about his weekend plans, but I couldn’t understand why he was so excited.”
  • In a conversation about someone who talks loudly without making much sense, one might say, “He yammers on and on, and it’s hard to have a meaningful conversation.”
  • A person might joke, “I can’t concentrate with all the yammering going on around me!”

31. Tittle-tattle

Tittle-tattle refers to idle or petty gossip, usually about other people’s personal lives. It often involves spreading rumors or sharing juicy details about someone’s private affairs.

  • For example, “She’s always engaging in tittle-tattle about her coworkers.”
  • In a conversation about office politics, someone might say, “I try to avoid tittle-tattle and focus on my work.”
  • A person might express annoyance with gossip by saying, “I wish people would stop with the tittle-tattle and mind their own business.”

32. Have a chinwag

Having a chinwag means to have a casual or friendly conversation with someone. It implies a relaxed and informal exchange of ideas, stories, or opinions.

  • For instance, “Let’s grab a cup of coffee and have a chinwag.”
  • In a social gathering, someone might suggest, “Why don’t we all sit down and have a chinwag?”
  • A person might ask, “Can we have a chinwag about the upcoming project?”

33. Have a natter

Having a natter refers to having a light-hearted and informal conversation with someone. It often involves discussing everyday topics or sharing personal anecdotes.

  • For example, “I met up with my friend for a cup of tea and a natter.”
  • In a group setting, someone might say, “Let’s all have a natter and catch up.”
  • A person might suggest, “We should have a natter about our weekend plans.”

34. Have a yarn

Having a yarn means to have a relaxed and informal conversation with someone. It often involves storytelling, sharing experiences, or discussing interesting topics.

  • For instance, “Let’s sit by the fire and have a yarn.”
  • In a social gathering, someone might say, “I love having a yarn with old friends.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have a minute to have a yarn about the project?”

35. Have a gabfest

Having a gabfest means to have a lively and talkative discussion with someone. It implies an energetic and animated exchange of ideas, opinions, or stories.

  • For example, “Whenever my friends get together, it turns into a gabfest.”
  • In a group setting, someone might suggest, “Let’s have a gabfest and brainstorm ideas.”
  • A person might say, “I had a great gabfest with my colleagues during lunch.”