Top 53 Slang For Targeted – Meaning & Usage

Targeted slang is all the rage in today’s fast-paced digital world. From marketing strategies to online interactions, understanding and using the right slang can make a world of difference. Our team at Fluentslang has curated a list of the most cutting-edge targeted slang that will keep you ahead of the game. Get ready to level up your communication game with this essential list!

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1. Marked

When someone or something is “marked,” it means they have been identified as a target for a specific action or purpose.

  • For example, “The detective marked the suspect as the prime suspect in the case.”
  • In a game of tag, one player might say, “You’re marked!” to indicate they are the target.
  • In a military operation, a commander might say, “That building is marked for demolition.”

2. Zeroed in on

To “zero in on” something means to focus or direct one’s attention towards it, often with the intention of targeting or pursuing it.

  • For instance, “The sniper zeroed in on the enemy soldier.”
  • In a game of hide-and-seek, a player might say, “I’ve zeroed in on your hiding spot.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s zero in on the key issues we need to address.”

3. Homed in on

To “home in on” something means to narrow or direct one’s focus on it, often with the intention of targeting or pursuing it.

  • For example, “The detective homed in on the crucial piece of evidence.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I’m homing in on the main point of your argument.”
  • When searching for a lost item, one might say, “I’ve homed in on the general area where I think it might be.”

4. Locked onto

To “lock onto” something means to target it with precision or accuracy, often with the intention of tracking or pursuing it.

  • For instance, “The missile locked onto its target and struck with precision.”
  • In a video game, a player might say, “I’ve locked onto the enemy and I’m ready to attack.”
  • When tracking a moving object, someone might say, “I’ve locked onto the suspect’s position.”

5. Picked out

To “pick out” something means to select or single it out from a group or set, often with the intention of targeting or focusing on it.

  • For example, “The coach picked out the most talented player for the starting lineup.”
  • In a crowd, someone might say, “I picked out my friend’s face among the sea of people.”
  • When shopping for clothes, a person might say, “I picked out a stylish outfit for the party.”

6. Set sights on

This phrase means to direct one’s attention or intention towards a specific target or goal. It is often used to indicate a determined and focused approach.

  • For example, a coach might say, “We need to set our sights on winning the championship.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might say, “I have set my sights on this company because of its strong reputation.”
  • A student might declare, “I have set my sights on getting straight A’s this semester.”

7. Fixed on

This phrase means to be completely focused or concentrated on something. It implies a strong and unwavering attention towards a particular target.

  • For instance, a detective might say, “His eyes were fixed on the suspect, never wavering.”
  • In a conversation about career goals, someone might say, “I have my sights fixed on becoming a CEO.”
  • A photographer might describe capturing a perfect shot by saying, “My camera was fixed on the subject, capturing every detail.”

8. Tagged

This term refers to being marked or identified as a target for a specific action or purpose. It can also imply being singled out or chosen for a particular task or role.

  • For example, in a game of tag, someone might say, “You’re tagged! You’re it!”
  • In a competitive sport, a player might be tagged as the main target for the opposing team.
  • In a group project, a team member might say, “I’ve been tagged to handle the research and data analysis.”

9. Chosen

This word indicates being selected or picked for a particular purpose or role. It implies being singled out or designated based on certain criteria or qualities.

  • For instance, a team captain might say, “You have been chosen to lead the team in the next game.”
  • In a casting process, an actor might be chosen for a specific role in a film or play.
  • A teacher might say, “You have been chosen to represent the school in the science fair.”

10. Designated

This term refers to being officially assigned or appointed for a specific task or role. It implies being given a particular responsibility or duty.

  • For example, a parking lot might have designated spaces for disabled individuals.
  • In a workplace, someone might be designated as the team leader for a project.
  • A pilot might say, “We have designated landing zones for different aircraft.”

11. Singled out

When someone is singled out, they are specifically chosen or targeted for a particular reason or purpose.

  • For example, in a classroom, a teacher might say, “I singled out Sarah for her excellent performance on the test.”
  • In a group of friends, someone might feel singled out if they are the only one not invited to a party.
  • A manager might single out an employee for recognition and praise for their hard work.

12. Aimed at

When something is aimed at a target, it means it is directed towards or intended for that target.

  • For instance, a marketing campaign might be aimed at a specific demographic or target audience.
  • In a debate, someone might say, “His argument was clearly aimed at discrediting his opponent.”
  • A criticism might be aimed at a particular individual or group for their actions or behavior.

13. Targeted

When someone or something is targeted, it means they are the main focus or subject of attention.

  • For example, a targeted advertising campaign is designed to reach a specific audience or demographic.
  • In a protest, the demonstrators might target a particular company or government policy.
  • A criminal might target a specific individual or location for a robbery.
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14. Pointed at

When something is pointed at someone or something, it means it is directed or aimed towards that person or object.

  • For instance, a finger might be pointed at someone to indicate blame or accusation.
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “Don’t point that knife at me!”
  • A laser pointer might be used to point at specific details on a presentation slide.

15. Centered on

When something is centered on a subject or topic, it means it is focused or concentrated on that specific thing.

  • For example, a discussion might be centered on finding a solution to a problem.
  • A movie might be centered on a particular character or event.
  • In a meeting, the conversation might be centered on a specific agenda item.

16. Focused on

This phrase is used to describe someone or something that is paying close attention or giving their full concentration to a specific task or goal.

  • For example, “She was focused on finishing her assignment before the deadline.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “Stay focused on the game plan.”
  • In a work setting, a manager might say, “Let’s stay focused on our objectives for this quarter.”

17. Directed at

This phrase is used to describe something that is intended or targeted towards a specific person or group.

  • For instance, “The criticism was directed at him for his poor performance.”
  • In a marketing campaign, a company might say, “This product is specifically directed at young professionals.”
  • During a debate, a candidate might say, “My remarks are directed at my opponent’s policies.”

18. Marked for

This phrase is used to indicate that someone or something has been chosen or singled out for a particular purpose or action.

  • For example, “The package was marked for express delivery.”
  • In a restaurant, a waiter might say, “This table is marked for a reservation.”
  • A teacher might mark a student’s paper for extra credit.

19. Spotlit

This term is used to describe someone or something that has been given special attention or prominence.

  • For instance, “The talented singer was spotlit during the performance.”
  • In a photography exhibition, a curator might say, “This photograph is spotlit to draw attention to its artistic value.”
  • A news article might spotlight a local hero’s achievements.

20. Nailed

This slang term is used to describe someone who has successfully completed a task or achieved something with great skill or precision.

  • For example, “He nailed the presentation and impressed the entire team.”
  • In a sports game, a commentator might say, “The player nailed the game-winning shot.”
  • A chef might say, “I nailed the recipe and it turned out perfectly.”

21. Bullseyed

This slang is used to describe successfully hitting a target with precision. It implies that the person or object aimed at was hit right on target.

  • For example, a sniper might say, “I bullseyed the target from 500 meters away.”
  • In a game of darts, a player might exclaim, “I bullseyed the triple 20!”
  • A person describing a successful marketing campaign might say, “Our ad campaign really bullseyed our target audience.”

22. Zoned in on

This slang is used to describe the act of concentrating or focusing intensely on a specific target or task. It implies that all distractions are blocked out and full attention is given to the target.

  • For instance, a basketball player might say, “I zoned in on the basket and made the shot.”
  • A student preparing for an exam might say, “I need to zone in on studying and avoid distractions.”
  • A detective investigating a case might say, “I zoned in on the suspect and gathered crucial evidence.”

23. Target locked

This slang is used to indicate that someone has identified and focused their attention on a specific target or goal. It can be used metaphorically or literally.

  • For example, a fighter pilot might say, “Target locked, ready to engage.”
  • A salesperson might say, “I’ve got my target locked, time to close the deal.”
  • A person discussing personal goals might say, “I’ve got my sights set and my target locked.”

24. Pinpointed

This slang is used to describe the act of locating or identifying something with great precision. It implies that the exact location or details of the target have been determined.

  • For instance, a detective might say, “We pinpointed the suspect’s location and made the arrest.”
  • A scientist might say, “We pinpointed the cause of the problem through extensive research.”
  • A person giving directions might say, “I can pinpoint the exact location on the map for you.”

25. Centered in on

This slang is used to describe the act of focusing or directing attention towards a specific target. It implies that all attention and energy are concentrated on that target.

  • For example, a photographer might say, “I centered in on the subject and captured the perfect shot.”
  • A coach might say, “We need to center in on our opponent’s weaknesses and exploit them.”
  • A person discussing meditation might say, “I centered in on my breath and found inner peace.”

26. Tagged for

When someone or something is “tagged for” a specific purpose or action, it means they have been identified or chosen to be the target of that action.

  • For example, “The suspect was tagged for arrest by the police.”
  • In a game of tag, one player might say, “You’re it!” to indicate that another player has been tagged for chasing.
  • In an office setting, a manager might say, “I’ve tagged you for this project” to assign someone a specific task.

27. Selected for

When someone or something is “selected for” a particular purpose or action, it means they have been chosen or singled out to be the target of that action.

  • For instance, “She was selected for the lead role in the play.”
  • In a sports competition, a coach might say, “You’ve been selected for the starting lineup.”
  • In a military operation, a soldier might be selected for a special mission or assignment.
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28. Targeted in on

When someone or something is “targeted in on,” it means they are being focused on or directed towards as the specific target of an action.

  • For example, “The sniper targeted in on the enemy soldier.”
  • In a marketing campaign, a company might target in on a specific demographic to tailor their advertising.
  • In a game of darts, a player might target in on the bullseye to aim for a high score.

29. Sighted in on

When someone “sights in on” a target, it means they are adjusting their aim or focus to align with the intended target.

  • For instance, “The hunter sighted in on the deer before taking the shot.”
  • In a military operation, a sniper might sight in on a distant target before firing.
  • In a shooting competition, a participant might sight in on the bullseye to improve their accuracy.

30. Targeted for

When someone or something is “targeted for” a specific purpose or action, it means they are intended to be the focus or recipient of that action.

  • For example, “The company was targeted for a hostile takeover.”
  • In a crime investigation, a detective might say, “We believe the victim was targeted for robbery.”
  • In a marketing campaign, a product might be targeted for a specific demographic or audience.

31. Zeroed in for

This phrase means to direct one’s attention or efforts towards a specific target or goal. It implies a high level of concentration and determination.

  • For example, “The detective zeroed in for the killer’s hideout.”
  • In a game of darts, a player might say, “I’m going to zero in for the bullseye.”
  • A student studying for an exam might say, “I need to zero in for this chapter, it’s the most important one.”

32. Homed in for

This expression means to narrow down or focus on a specific target or objective. It suggests precision and accuracy in identifying and pursuing a goal.

  • For instance, “The company homed in for the best marketing strategy.”
  • In a scavenger hunt, a participant might say, “I’m homing in for the final clue.”
  • A researcher might state, “We have homed in for the most promising hypothesis.”

33. Locked on to

This phrase refers to the act of focusing or fixating on a specific target. It can be used metaphorically to indicate a strong interest or determination towards achieving a particular goal.

  • For example, “The sniper locked on to the enemy’s position.”
  • In a negotiation, one party might say, “I’m locked on to getting the best deal.”
  • A person trying to lose weight might say, “I’m locked on to my fitness goals.”

34. Picked off

This slang term means to eliminate or take out a specific target, often used in the context of combat or competition.

  • For instance, “The sniper picked off the enemy soldiers one by one.”
  • In a game of paintball, a player might say, “I picked off three opponents from behind cover.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The goalkeeper made a fantastic save, picking off the shot from the top corner.”

35. Set on

This phrase means to be strongly determined or resolved to achieve a particular outcome or goal. It implies a strong sense of purpose and focus.

  • For example, “He was set on becoming a professional musician.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might say, “I’m set on getting this position.”
  • A person planning a trip might state, “I’m set on visiting all the major landmarks.”

36. Tagged as

This phrase is used to describe someone or something that has been labeled or categorized in a specific way. It implies that the person or thing has been singled out or identified for a particular purpose or characteristic.

  • For example, in a social media post, someone might write, “Just tagged as #goals by my friends.”
  • In a discussion about fashion trends, someone might say, “That outfit is tagged as the latest style.”
  • A person might comment on a photo, “Tagged as the best view in town!”

37. Chosen as

This phrase is used to indicate that someone or something has been picked or selected for a specific role, position, or purpose. It implies that the person or thing has been singled out as the preferred choice.

  • For instance, in a talent show, the host might announce, “And the winner is chosen as the best singer.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might say, “I was chosen as the most qualified candidate for the position.”
  • A person might proudly state, “I was chosen as the team captain for our sports team.”

38. Designated as

This phrase is used to indicate that someone or something has been officially assigned or appointed to a specific role, position, or task. It implies that the person or thing has been given a specific designation or label.

  • For example, in a workplace, someone might be designated as the team leader for a project.
  • In a classroom, a student might be designated as the class representative.
  • A person might say, “I was designated as the official spokesperson for the event.”

39. Singled for

This phrase is used to describe someone or something that has been specifically chosen or selected for a particular purpose or role. It implies that the person or thing has been singled out among others as the preferred choice.

  • For instance, in a sports team, a player might be singled for their exceptional skills.
  • In a competition, a contestant might be singled for their unique talent.
  • A person might proudly state, “I was singled for the lead role in the play.”

40. Aimed for

This phrase is used to indicate that someone or something has been specifically targeted or aimed at for a particular action or outcome. It implies that the person or thing is the intended focus or objective.

  • For example, in a marketing campaign, a product might be aimed for a specific demographic.
  • In a game, a player might aim for the highest score.
  • A person might say, “I am aiming for a promotion at work.”

41. Pointed for

When something is “pointed for,” it means it is intentionally aimed or directed towards a specific target or goal.

  • For example, “His criticism was pointed for the CEO, highlighting her mistakes.”
  • In a discussion about marketing strategies, someone might say, “Our advertising campaign is pointed for young adults who are interested in fitness.”
  • A coach might give instructions to a player, saying, “Make sure your passes are pointed for your teammates, not the opponents.”

42. Centered for

When something is “centered for,” it means it is focused on or geared towards a particular subject or purpose.

  • For instance, “The event was centered for raising awareness about climate change.”
  • In a conversation about educational programs, someone might mention, “Our curriculum is centered for developing critical thinking skills.”
  • A company might advertise a product as “centered for providing maximum comfort.”
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43. Focused for

When something is “focused for,” it means it is concentrated on or directed towards a specific objective or outcome.

  • For example, “The team is focused for winning the championship.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “I’m focused for improving my time management skills.”
  • A student might mention, “I need to stay focused for studying if I want to pass the exam.”

44. Directed for

When something is “directed for,” it means it is aimed at or intended for a particular target or purpose.

  • For instance, “This message is directed for all employees.”
  • In a conversation about marketing strategies, someone might mention, “Our campaign is directed for reaching a younger demographic.”
  • A teacher might give instructions to a student, saying, “Your presentation should be directed for informing the audience about the topic.”

45. Nailed down

When something is “nailed down,” it means it has been accurately identified, determined, or figured out.

  • For example, “We finally nailed down the cause of the issue.”
  • In a discussion about project plans, someone might say, “We need to nail down the details before moving forward.”
  • A detective might mention, “We were able to nail down the suspect’s whereabouts during the time of the crime.”

46. Sought after

This term is used to describe something that many people want or are actively looking for.

  • For example, “The new iPhone model is highly sought after.”
  • A person might say, “That limited edition sneaker is really sought after by collectors.”
  • In a discussion about job opportunities, someone might mention, “Tech skills are sought after in today’s market.”

47. Intended for

This phrase is used to indicate that something is specifically created or directed towards a particular group or purpose.

  • For instance, “This book is intended for young readers.”
  • In a conversation about a gift, someone might say, “I bought this necklace intended for my sister.”
  • A person discussing a specific event might mention, “This conference is intended for industry professionals.”

48. Tailored for

This term is used to describe something that has been modified or adjusted to meet the needs or preferences of a particular person or situation.

  • For example, “This workout plan is tailored for beginners.”
  • A person might say, “I have a suit tailored for important meetings.”
  • In a discussion about marketing strategies, someone might mention, “Our campaign is tailored for the younger demographic.”

49. Slated for

This phrase is used to indicate that something is scheduled or planned to happen at a certain time or for a particular purpose.

  • For instance, “The concert is slated for next month.”
  • In a conversation about upcoming movies, someone might say, “The new superhero film is slated for release in summer.”
  • A person discussing a business project might mention, “The presentation is slated for tomorrow’s meeting.”

50. Reserved for

This term is used to indicate that something is specifically set aside or kept exclusively for a particular person or purpose.

  • For example, “That seat is reserved for VIP guests.”
  • A person might say, “This parking spot is reserved for employees only.”
  • In a discussion about resources, someone might mention, “These funds are reserved for emergency situations.”

51. Locked on

This phrase is used to describe someone who is intensely focused on a specific target or goal. It can also refer to someone who is determined to achieve something.

  • For example, in a sports context, a coach might say, “He was locked on the basket and made the perfect shot.”
  • In a business setting, a manager might say, “We need to be locked on our sales targets and work towards meeting them.”
  • A person discussing personal development might say, “I’m locked on my goals and won’t let anything distract me from achieving them.”

52. Pursued

This term is used to describe someone who is actively chasing or following a target, whether it be a person, an idea, or a goal. It can also imply a sense of determination and persistence in going after what one wants.

  • For instance, in a romantic context, someone might say, “He pursued her relentlessly until she finally agreed to go on a date.”
  • In a professional context, a job seeker might say, “I pursued my dream job by networking and reaching out to key contacts.”
  • A person discussing their passion might say, “I have pursued my love for photography and turned it into a successful career.”

53. Eyed

To “eye” something means to watch or observe it closely, often with a sense of suspicion or interest. This term can also imply a desire or intention to obtain or possess the target of one’s attention.

  • For example, if someone is looking at a delicious cake, they might say, “I’m eyeing that piece of cake. It looks amazing.”
  • In a competitive context, a person might say, “They eyed the prize and trained hard to win the championship.”
  • A person discussing job opportunities might say, “I have been eyeing that company for a while now. I hope to work there someday.”