Top 55 Slang For Taught – Meaning & Usage

In a world where language is constantly evolving, staying up-to-date with the latest slang is essential. Are you tired of feeling out of the loop when it comes to understanding modern slang words for “taught”? Well, fear not! We’ve got you covered. Our team of language enthusiasts has scoured the depths of the internet to bring you a curated list of the top slang for “taught”. Get ready to expand your vocabulary and impress your friends with these trendy expressions.

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1. Schooled

This term refers to teaching someone a lesson or educating them, often in a competitive or confrontational manner.

  • For example, “He thought he was a great basketball player, but I schooled him on the court.”
  • In a debate, one person might say, “I schooled my opponent with solid evidence and logical arguments.”
  • A teacher might use this term to describe a successful class session, saying, “I really schooled my students on the importance of grammar today.”

2. Learned the ropes

This phrase means to become familiar with the basic knowledge or skills needed to navigate or succeed in a particular situation or field.

  • For instance, “It took me a while, but I finally learned the ropes of my new job.”
  • A person might say, “I’m still learning the ropes of being a parent.”
  • When discussing a new hobby, someone might say, “I’ve learned the ropes of knitting and can now make basic scarves.”

3. Got the lowdown

This slang phrase means to receive or gather all the necessary information or details about a particular subject or situation.

  • For example, “I got the lowdown on the upcoming event from a reliable source.”
  • In a conversation about a new restaurant, someone might say, “I need to get the lowdown on their menu and prices before deciding to go.”
  • A person might ask a friend, “Can you give me the lowdown on what happened at the meeting?”

4. Crammed

To “cram” means to study or learn a large amount of information in a short period of time, often right before a test or exam.

  • For instance, “I crammed all night for the biology exam and managed to pass.”
  • A student might say, “I have to cram for my history test tomorrow.”
  • In a discussion about exam preparation, someone might say, “Cramming may help in the short term, but it’s not an effective long-term learning strategy.”

5. Absorbed

To “absorb” in this context means to fully understand and internalize information or knowledge.

  • For example, “After reading that book, I feel like I’ve absorbed a lot of new ideas.”
  • A person might say, “I absorbed all the information from the lecture and can now explain it to others.”
  • When discussing a language, someone might say, “Living in a foreign country helped me absorb the language more quickly.”

6. Grasped

When someone has grasped something, it means they have understood or comprehended it. This slang term is often used to indicate a level of understanding or mastery of a concept or skill.

  • For example, a student might say, “I finally grasped the concept of calculus.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say, “I think I’ve grasped the new software.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Great job, you’ve really grasped the material!”

7. Picked up

When someone has picked up something, it means they have learned it quickly or easily. This slang term implies a natural ability to acquire knowledge or skills without much effort.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I picked up Spanish during my trip to Spain.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “She’s a natural athlete, she picks up new techniques quickly.”
  • A musician might say, “I can pick up songs by ear without needing sheet music.”

8. Mastered

When someone has mastered something, it means they have achieved a high level of skill or expertise in a particular area. This slang term implies a level of proficiency that goes beyond mere understanding or familiarity.

  • For example, a martial artist might say, “After years of training, I’ve finally mastered the art of taekwondo.”
  • In a musical context, a performer might say, “He has mastered the guitar and can play any song.”
  • A chef might say, “I have mastered the art of French cuisine after working in top restaurants.”

9. Nailed it

When someone has nailed it, it means they have performed a task or activity perfectly or with great success. This slang term is often used to express satisfaction or pride in one’s own accomplishments.

  • For instance, a comedian might say, “I delivered that punchline perfectly, I nailed it.”
  • In a cooking show, a contestant might say, “I followed the recipe exactly and nailed the dish.”
  • A presenter might say, “I was nervous, but I nailed my presentation and got a standing ovation.”

10. Got the hang of it

When someone has got the hang of it, it means they have understood how to do something or have become familiar with a particular task or skill. This slang term implies a level of comfort and confidence in performing the activity.

  • For example, a person learning to ride a bike might say, “I finally got the hang of it, and now I can ride without training wheels.”
  • In a work setting, a new employee might say, “After a few weeks, I got the hang of using the company’s software.”
  • A dancer might say, “It took some practice, but I got the hang of that complicated routine.”

11. Figured it out

This phrase is used to indicate that someone has successfully understood or solved something that was previously unclear or confusing.

  • For example, if someone is struggling with a math problem and finally solves it, they might say, “I figured it out!”
  • In a conversation about a complex concept, someone might say, “It took me a while, but I finally figured it out.”
  • A person might use this phrase to describe their successful navigation of a difficult situation, saying, “I was lost at first, but then I figured it out.”

12. Got the scoop

This slang phrase means to have obtained or learned the latest or most important information about a particular topic or situation.

  • For instance, if someone asks about the latest gossip, you might respond, “I’ve got the scoop!”
  • In a conversation about a breaking news story, someone might say, “I just got the scoop on what really happened.”
  • A person might use this phrase to indicate that they have inside information, saying, “I know someone who works there, so I’ve got the scoop.”

13. Got the drift

This slang phrase means to have understood the general idea or concept being discussed, even if not all the details are clear.

  • For example, if someone is explaining a complex plan and asks if you understand, you might say, “Yeah, I got the drift.”
  • In a conversation about a movie plot, someone might say, “I didn’t catch all the details, but I got the drift.”
  • A person might use this phrase to indicate that they understand the overall message or intention, saying, “I may not agree with them, but I got the drift of what they were saying.”

14. Got the picture

This slang phrase means to have understood the situation or instructions clearly.

  • For instance, if someone gives you directions and asks if you understand, you might say, “Got the picture.”
  • In a conversation about a complicated task, someone might say, “I need you to do this, do you got the picture?”
  • A person might use this phrase to indicate that they have a clear understanding of what is expected of them, saying, “I listened carefully, so I got the picture.”

15. Got the memo

This slang phrase means to have received or become aware of important information or news.

  • For example, if someone mentions a new company policy and asks if you are aware of it, you might say, “Yeah, got the memo.”
  • In a conversation about a change in plans, someone might say, “Didn’t you get the memo? We’re meeting at a different location.”
  • A person might use this phrase to indicate that they are up to date on the latest information, saying, “I’m in the loop, got the memo.”

16. Got the message

This phrase is used to indicate that someone has understood or comprehended something that was taught or explained to them.

  • For example, if a teacher gives instructions to a student and the student understands, they might say, “I got the message, thanks.”
  • In a business meeting, if a colleague explains a new strategy and everyone understands, someone might say, “Everyone got the message, right?”
  • If a friend explains a joke and you finally understand it, you could say, “Ah, now I got the message!”

17. Got the gist

When someone says they “got the gist,” it means they understood the main or essential point of something that was taught or explained to them.

  • For instance, if a teacher gives a long lecture and a student summarizes the main points, they might say, “I got the gist of what the teacher was saying.”
  • In a book club discussion, if someone gives a brief summary of a complex novel, they might say, “I got the gist of the story.”
  • If a friend explains a movie plot and you understand the main storyline, you could say, “I got the gist of the movie.”

18. Got the idea

This phrase is used to indicate that someone has understood or comprehended something that was taught or explained to them.

  • For example, if a teacher asks a question and a student answers correctly, the teacher might say, “Great job, you got the idea!”
  • In a training session, if an employee demonstrates understanding of a new procedure, the trainer might say, “You got the idea, now let’s practice.”
  • If a friend explains a concept and you understand it, you could say, “I got the idea, thanks for explaining.”

19. Got the knowledge

When someone says they “got the knowledge,” it means they have acquired or gained the information or understanding that was taught or explained to them.

  • For instance, if a teacher presents new information and a student successfully learns and remembers it, they might say, “I got the knowledge from that lesson.”
  • In a workshop, if participants actively engage with the material and retain the information, the facilitator might say, “Congratulations, you all got the knowledge!”
  • If a friend shares interesting facts and you remember them, you could say, “I got the knowledge, thanks for sharing.”

20. Got the education

When someone says they “got the education,” it means they have received a comprehensive or thorough education on a particular topic or subject.

  • For example, if a student completes a degree program and gains a broad understanding of their field, they might say, “I got the education I needed to pursue my career.”
  • In a conversation about lifelong learning, if someone has pursued various courses and certifications, they might say, “I’ve got the education to back up my experience.”
  • If a friend discusses their academic achievements and qualifications, you could say, “Wow, you’ve really got the education!”

21. Got the lesson

This phrase is used to indicate that someone has understood or grasped a particular lesson or concept.

  • For example, after explaining a difficult math problem, a teacher might ask the student, “Do you got the lesson?”
  • In a conversation about a complex topic, a person might say, “I finally got the lesson after reading that article.”
  • A student might proudly exclaim, “I got the lesson and aced the test!”

22. Got the wisdom

This phrase is used to express that someone has acquired wisdom or knowledge, often from a specific source or experience.

  • For instance, after receiving advice from an older sibling, a person might say, “I got the wisdom from my sister and made a better decision.”
  • In a discussion about life lessons, someone might say, “I got the wisdom from my grandmother and it has guided me through tough times.”
  • A person might share, “I got the wisdom from reading books and it has broadened my perspective.”

23. Educated

This term is used to describe someone who has received a formal education or is knowledgeable about a particular subject.

  • For example, in a debate about politics, someone might say, “I am educated on the policies of both candidates.”
  • In a conversation about history, a person might mention, “I am educated on the events leading up to World War II.”
  • A student might proudly say, “I am educated in mathematics and can solve complex equations.”

24. Learned

This word is used to indicate that someone has gained knowledge or skills through study, experience, or teaching.

  • For instance, after attending a workshop on photography, a person might say, “I learned some great techniques.”
  • In a discussion about language learning, someone might say, “I learned Spanish in high school and can now hold conversations.”
  • A person might share, “I learned how to play the guitar and now I can perform in a band.”

25. Trained

This term is used to describe someone who has undergone specific instruction or practice in order to develop skills or abilities in a particular area.

  • For example, in a conversation about athletes, someone might say, “He is trained in martial arts and can defend himself.”
  • In a discussion about job qualifications, a person might mention, “I am trained in customer service and can handle difficult situations.”
  • A person might proudly share, “I am trained in first aid and can provide assistance in emergencies.”

26. Tutored

This term refers to receiving personalized instruction or guidance from a tutor. It implies a one-on-one teaching approach where the tutor helps the student understand a specific subject or topic.

  • For example, a student might say, “I got tutored in math to improve my grades.”
  • In a conversation about academic support, someone might mention, “Tutoring can be really helpful for students who need extra help.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you know anyone who tutors in English? I need help with my writing skills.”

27. Coached

To be coached means to receive guidance and support from a coach in order to improve performance or develop skills in a specific area. This term is often used in sports, but can also apply to other areas such as career development or personal growth.

  • For instance, a soccer player might say, “My coach really coached me on my dribbling skills.”
  • In a discussion about leadership, someone might mention, “Good leaders know how to coach their team members to success.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you recommend a coach who can help me improve my public speaking?”

28. Instructed

To be instructed means to receive formal or structured teaching or guidance from a teacher or instructor. This term implies a more formal and structured approach to learning.

  • For example, a student might say, “I was instructed in the basics of chemistry.”
  • In a conversation about education, someone might mention, “Teachers are responsible for instructing students in various subjects.”
  • A person might ask, “Where can I find a reliable source of instruction for learning how to play the guitar?”

29. Enlightened

To be enlightened means to gain new knowledge or understanding about a particular subject or concept. It implies a deeper level of understanding or insight.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I was enlightened by the speaker’s presentation on climate change.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, a person might mention, “Reading books can be a source of enlightenment.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you recommend any documentaries that are enlightening and thought-provoking?”

30. Mentored

To be mentored means to receive guidance, advice, and support from a more experienced individual in a particular field or area. Mentoring involves a long-term relationship where the mentor helps the mentee develop skills, knowledge, and confidence.

  • For example, a young entrepreneur might say, “I was mentored by a successful business owner who helped me navigate the challenges of starting my own company.”
  • In a conversation about career development, someone might mention, “Having a mentor can greatly accelerate your professional growth.”
  • A person might ask, “How can I find a mentor who can guide me in my career?”

31. Cultivated

To be cultivated means to be well-educated or refined. It refers to someone who has acquired a high level of knowledge or sophistication.

  • For example, “She comes from a highly cultivated family with a long history of academic achievement.”
  • In a discussion about literature, someone might say, “The protagonist in the novel is a cultivated individual with a deep appreciation for the arts.”
  • A teacher might describe a student as “cultivated” if they consistently demonstrate a strong understanding of complex concepts.
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32. Inducted

To be inducted means to be accepted into a group or organization. It often implies a formal process of initiation or welcoming.

  • For instance, “He was inducted into the Hall of Fame for his outstanding achievements in sports.”
  • In a military context, someone might say, “After completing basic training, recruits are officially inducted into the armed forces.”
  • A fan of a music band might say, “I was inducted into their fan club after attending multiple concerts.”

33. Trained up

To be trained up means to be fully trained or prepared for a particular task or role. It implies a high level of proficiency or expertise.

  • For example, “After years of practice, she’s trained up to be a professional ballet dancer.”
  • In a discussion about job qualifications, someone might say, “Candidates must be trained up in the latest software and technology.”
  • A coach might encourage their team by saying, “Let’s train up and give our best performance in the upcoming game.”

34. Grounded

To be grounded means to be well-informed or knowledgeable about a particular subject or situation. It implies having a solid understanding or foundation.

  • For instance, “She’s grounded in the principles of physics and can explain complex concepts with ease.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “It’s important to be grounded in the facts before forming an opinion.”
  • A teacher might describe a student as “grounded” if they consistently demonstrate a deep understanding of the material.

35. Edified

To be edified means to be enlightened or educated, often in a moral or intellectual sense. It implies gaining knowledge or understanding that leads to personal growth.

  • For example, “Reading philosophical texts has edified him and broadened his perspective on life.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might say, “Visiting art museums can be a highly edifying experience.”
  • A mentor might say to their mentee, “I hope our conversations have edified you and helped you develop new insights.”

36. Instilled

To instill something means to gradually and firmly establish a belief, idea, or value in someone’s mind or heart. It implies a long-term process of teaching or influencing.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I try to instill a love for reading in my students.”
  • A parent might say, “I want to instill a strong work ethic in my children.”
  • A coach might say, “I aim to instill confidence and teamwork in my players.”

37. Nurtured

To nurture means to care for and encourage the growth, development, or success of someone or something. It implies providing a supportive environment or fostering positive conditions for growth.

  • For instance, a mentor might say, “I strive to nurture the talents and aspirations of my mentees.”
  • A gardener might say, “I carefully nurture my plants to ensure they thrive.”
  • A manager might say, “I believe in nurturing the potential of my team members.”

38. Fostered

To foster means to encourage or promote the development or growth of something. It implies creating an environment that supports and nurtures progress or improvement.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I aim to foster a love for learning in my students.”
  • A community leader might say, “We need to foster a sense of unity and cooperation among residents.”
  • A business owner might say, “We strive to foster innovation and creativity in our workplace.”

39. Equipped

To equip means to provide someone with the necessary tools, skills, or resources to successfully accomplish a task or achieve a goal.

  • For instance, a trainer might say, “I want to equip my clients with the knowledge and skills to lead a healthy lifestyle.”
  • A teacher might say, “I aim to equip my students with the skills they need for future success.”
  • A coach might say, “We need to equip our team with the right strategies and techniques to win the game.”

40. Empowered

To empower means to give someone the power, authority, or confidence to take control of their own life, make decisions, and take action.

  • For example, a motivational speaker might say, “I want to empower individuals to believe in themselves and pursue their dreams.”
  • A leader might say, “I aim to empower my team members to take ownership of their work and make decisions.”
  • A social activist might say, “We need to empower marginalized communities to have a voice and advocate for their rights.”

41. Enriched

When someone is “enriched,” it means that their knowledge or understanding has been expanded or enhanced in some way. This can refer to learning new information, gaining a deeper understanding of a subject, or broadening one’s perspective.

  • For example, a student might say, “I feel so enriched after taking that art history class.”
  • Someone who attends a thought-provoking lecture might comment, “I always leave those talks feeling enriched.”
  • A person who reads a thought-provoking book might say, “I love reading novels that leave me feeling enriched.”

42. Enlivened

When something is “enlivened,” it means that it has been made more interesting, exciting, or engaging. This can refer to a conversation, an event, a piece of writing, or any other form of communication or experience.

  • For instance, a person might say, “The party was so dull until the DJ arrived and enlivened the atmosphere.”
  • Someone who watches a captivating movie might comment, “The film really enlivened my evening.”
  • A person who reads a funny article might say, “That article really enlivened my lunch break.”

43. Enamored

When someone is “enamored” with something, it means that they are deeply fascinated, charmed, or infatuated with it. This can refer to a person, an idea, an object, or any other subject of interest.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m absolutely enamored with this new band. I can’t stop listening to their music.”
  • Someone who visits a beautiful city might comment, “I’m completely enamored with the architecture and culture here.”
  • A person who discovers a new hobby might say, “I’m enamored with painting. It’s become my favorite way to relax.”

44. Initiated

When someone is “initiated” into something, it means that they have been introduced to or started something new. This can refer to joining a group, learning a skill, or beginning a process or activity.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I was initiated into the secret society last night. It was a surreal experience.”
  • Someone who starts a new job might comment, “I’m excited to be initiated into the company culture and learn the ropes.”
  • A person who begins a fitness program might say, “I’ve been initiated into the world of weightlifting, and it’s challenging but rewarding.”

45. Informed

When someone is “informed,” it means that they have been provided with knowledge or information about a particular subject. This can refer to being educated on a topic, being kept up-to-date on current events, or being given important details or facts.

  • For example, a person might say, “I feel well-informed about the upcoming election after reading multiple news sources.”
  • Someone who attends a seminar might comment, “I left the event feeling informed and inspired.”
  • A person who receives an email with important updates might say, “Thanks for keeping me informed about the changes to the project.”

46. School of hard knocks

This phrase refers to learning through personal experiences, especially those that are tough or challenging. It suggests that the lessons learned from these experiences are valuable and can teach someone important life lessons.

  • For example, a person might say, “I didn’t go to college, but I learned everything I know from the school of hard knocks.”
  • In a discussion about overcoming obstacles, someone might share, “I’ve been through the school of hard knocks and it’s made me stronger.”
  • A motivational speaker might inspire others by saying, “Don’t be afraid to embrace the school of hard knocks. It’s where you’ll learn the most valuable lessons in life.”

47. Groomed

In slang terms, “groomed” refers to being prepared or trained for a specific purpose or role. It suggests that someone has received the necessary training or guidance to excel in a particular area.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’ve been groomed for this job my whole life.”
  • In a discussion about talent development, someone might mention, “He’s a natural athlete, but he’s also been groomed for success.”
  • A mentor might advise a mentee, “You’re being groomed for leadership. Take advantage of the opportunities and learn as much as you can.”

48. Polished

When someone is described as “polished” in slang, it means they have refined skills or abilities in a particular area. It suggests that they have honed their craft or expertise to a high level.

  • For example, a person might say, “She’s a polished public speaker. Her presentations are always impressive.”
  • In a discussion about musicians, someone might comment, “He’s a polished guitar player. His technique is flawless.”
  • A coach might compliment a player by saying, “You’ve become a polished athlete. Your skills have improved tremendously.”

49. Seasoned

In slang terms, “seasoned” refers to someone who is experienced or skilled in a particular field. It suggests that they have been through various situations and have acquired valuable knowledge and expertise.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He’s a seasoned detective. He knows all the tricks of the trade.”
  • In a discussion about chefs, someone might mention, “She’s a seasoned cook. Her dishes are always delicious.”
  • A colleague might compliment another by saying, “You’re a seasoned professional. Your insights are always valuable.”

50. Fine-tuned

When something is described as “fine-tuned” in slang, it means it has been adjusted or improved to achieve optimal performance. It suggests that careful adjustments or refinements have been made to ensure the best possible outcome.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’ve fine-tuned my workout routine to maximize results.”
  • In a discussion about cars, someone might comment, “He’s fine-tuned his engine for maximum horsepower.”
  • A musician might describe their instrument as “fine-tuned” after making adjustments to improve its sound quality.
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51. Shown the ropes

This phrase means to teach someone the fundamental knowledge or skills needed for a particular task or job. It often refers to showing someone how to navigate a new environment or perform specific tasks.

  • For example, a new employee might say, “My coworker showed me the ropes on my first day.”
  • A mentor might tell a mentee, “I’ll show you the ropes of this industry and help you succeed.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “I’ll show you the ropes of this position and help you improve your skills.”

52. Clued in

To be clued in means to be given information or knowledge about something. It implies being informed or educated about a particular topic or situation.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Let me clue you in on the latest gossip.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “I’ll clue you in on the key concepts for the upcoming test.”
  • In a business setting, a colleague might say, “I’ll clue you in on the latest project updates during the meeting.”

53. Briefed

Being briefed means to be given a concise summary or overview of a topic or situation. It often involves providing essential information or instructions to someone.

  • For example, a military officer might say, “I was briefed on the mission objectives.”
  • A manager might inform their team, “We’ll be briefed on the new company policies tomorrow.”
  • In a legal context, an attorney might say to their client, “I’ll brief you on the case details before the trial.”

54. Prepped

To be prepped means to be prepared or readied for a specific task or event. It often involves getting ready mentally or physically for something.

  • For instance, an actor might say, “I spent hours prepping for my audition.”
  • A student might inform their friend, “I need to prep for the upcoming exam.”
  • In a medical setting, a nurse might say to a patient, “We’ll prep you for surgery by explaining the procedure and ensuring your comfort.”

55. Brainwashed

Brainwashed refers to the act of indoctrinating someone with a specific belief or ideology by manipulating their thoughts and opinions. It implies a loss of critical thinking or independent judgment.

  • For example, a person might say, “He was brainwashed by the cult and completely changed his beliefs.”
  • A critic might argue, “The government’s propaganda campaign aims to brainwash the population.”
  • In a psychological context, a therapist might discuss the concept of brainwashing and its effects on individuals.
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