Top 45 Slang For Teach – Meaning & Usage

Teaching is a noble profession, but sometimes it feels like educators are speaking a different language. That’s why we’ve put together a list of slang terms for teach to help you decode the secret language of the classroom. Whether you’re a teacher, a student, or just curious about education, this list will have you speaking the same language as the cool kids in no time! So, get ready to expand your vocabulary and ace your next classroom conversation.

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1. School

Refers to a place where students go to receive formal education. It can also be used to describe the process of learning or gaining knowledge.

  • For example, “I can’t wait to go back to school and see my friends.”
  • A person might say, “I learned that in school.”
  • Another might ask, “What did you learn in school today?”

2. Educate

To provide knowledge or information to someone, usually in a formal or structured manner.

  • For instance, “It’s important to educate children about the dangers of drugs.”
  • A teacher might say, “My goal is to educate my students and help them succeed.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “I want to educate you about the importance of saving money.”

3. Lesson

A period of time during which a teacher imparts knowledge or skills to students. It can also refer to a specific topic or concept taught during that period.

  • For example, “I have a math lesson in the afternoon.”
  • A student might say, “I learned a valuable lesson today.”
  • A teacher might ask, “Did you understand the lesson?”

4. Instruct

To provide guidance or directions to someone in order to teach or inform them about a particular task or topic.

  • For instance, “The coach instructed the players on how to execute the play.”
  • A person might say, “Can you instruct me on how to use this software?”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “I will instruct you on how to solve this equation.”

5. Train

To teach or prepare someone for a specific skill or task through practice and repetition.

  • For example, “I need to train for the upcoming marathon.”
  • A coach might say, “We will train hard to win the championship.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you train me on how to use this equipment?”

6. Tutor

A tutor is someone who provides extra instruction or guidance to help a student improve their understanding of a subject or skill. They often work one-on-one with the student outside of regular classroom hours.

  • For example, a student might say, “I have a math tutor who helps me with my homework.”
  • A parent might hire a tutor to help their child prepare for a standardized test, saying, “I want to make sure my child gets a high score, so I’ve hired a tutor.”
  • A college student might seek a tutor for a specific subject, like chemistry, and say, “I need a tutor to help me understand the material better.”

7. Coach

A coach is someone who guides and trains individuals or teams in a specific area, such as sports, business, or personal development. They provide instruction, motivation, and support to help their clients improve and reach their goals.

  • For instance, a soccer player might say, “My coach taught me how to kick the ball with more accuracy.”
  • In a motivational seminar, a speaker might say, “Find a coach who can help you unlock your full potential.”
  • A business executive might hire a coach to improve their leadership skills, saying, “I want to be a better manager, so I’ve hired a coach to help me.”

8. Guide

A guide is someone who leads or directs others, providing information, advice, and assistance along the way. They help people navigate unfamiliar territory or learn new skills.

  • For example, a tour guide might say, “Let me be your guide and show you the best sights in the city.”
  • A hiking enthusiast might say, “I hired a guide to take me on a challenging mountain trail.”
  • In a self-help book, the author might write, “I will be your guide on this journey to personal growth.”

9. Mentor

A mentor is an experienced and trusted advisor who provides guidance and support to someone less experienced. They share their knowledge, wisdom, and insights to help the mentee develop their skills and achieve their goals.

  • For instance, a young entrepreneur might say, “I have a mentor who is helping me navigate the challenges of starting a business.”
  • In a career development program, a mentor might say, “I will be your mentor and help you advance in your chosen field.”
  • A college student might seek a mentor in their desired profession, saying, “I want to learn from someone who has already achieved success in this industry.”

10. Lecture

A lecture is a formal presentation or speech given by an expert or knowledgeable individual on a specific topic. It is a one-way communication where the speaker imparts information or shares their insights with the audience.

  • For example, a professor might say, “I will be giving a lecture on quantum physics tomorrow.”
  • A student might write in their class notes, “The lecture covered the causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution.”
  • In a conference program, it might say, “Attend the keynote lecture by renowned author and speaker.”

11. Inform

To provide someone with knowledge or information about a certain topic or situation. “Fill in” is a slang term that implies sharing information that was previously unknown or unclear.

  • For example, a student might ask their friend, “Can you fill me in on what happened in class today?”
  • A coworker might say, “I’ll fill you in on the details of the meeting after it’s over.”
  • Someone might comment on a news article, “Thanks for filling us in on this important information.”

12. Enlighten

To provide someone with new knowledge or understanding about a particular subject. “Open one’s eyes” is a slang term that implies expanding one’s awareness or perspective.

  • For instance, a teacher might say to their students, “Let me enlighten you on the history of this event.”
  • A friend might say, “I never knew that before. Thanks for opening my eyes!”
  • A person might comment on a thought-provoking article, “This article really opened my eyes to a different way of thinking.”

13. Edify

To instruct or educate someone in a way that improves their knowledge or moral character. “Teach a lesson” is a slang term that implies imparting valuable knowledge or wisdom.

  • For example, a parent might say to their child, “I’m going to edify you on the importance of honesty.”
  • A mentor might tell their mentee, “Let me edify you on the principles of leadership.”
  • A person might reflect on a challenging experience, “That difficult situation really taught me a lesson and edified me.”

14. Familiarize

To make someone knowledgeable or acquainted with a particular subject or situation. “Get up to speed” is a slang term that implies becoming familiar or knowledgeable about something.

  • For instance, a new employee might say, “I need someone to familiarize me with the company’s policies.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you get me up to speed on what I missed at the meeting?”
  • A person might comment on a tutorial video, “This video really helped me get up to speed with using this software.”

15. Show

To explain or demonstrate something in a clear and understandable manner. “Break it down” is a slang term that implies simplifying or clarifying complex information.

  • For example, a teacher might say to their students, “Let me show you how to solve this math problem. I’ll break it down step by step.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you break it down for me? I’m having trouble understanding.”
  • A person might comment on a tutorial video, “This video really breaks it down and makes it easy to follow.”

16. Initiate

To begin or introduce someone into a particular activity or group. “Initiate” is often used to describe the process of teaching someone or bringing them into a new environment.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I will initiate the lesson by introducing the topic.”
  • A mentor might say, “I will initiate you into our group by explaining our values and expectations.”
  • In a training program, a supervisor might say, “We will initiate new employees with an orientation session.”

17. Direct

To give instructions or guidance to someone in a clear and straightforward manner. “Direct” is often used in the context of teaching or leading others.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “I will direct you on how to complete the assignment.”
  • A coach might say, “I will direct the team during the game to ensure everyone knows their role.”
  • In a classroom, a student might ask the teacher, “Can you direct me to additional resources for studying?”

18. Indoctrinate

To teach or influence someone with a specific set of beliefs, often in a forceful or one-sided manner. “Indoctrinate” is often used in a negative connotation, suggesting a lack of critical thinking or open-mindedness.

  • For example, a critic might say, “The school is trying to indoctrinate students with their political agenda.”
  • A parent might say, “I don’t want my child to be indoctrinated with biased information.”
  • In a debate, someone might accuse their opponent of trying to indoctrinate the audience with false information.
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19. Prime

To get someone ready or in the right mindset for a particular task or activity. “Prime” can also refer to providing someone with the necessary knowledge or skills to succeed.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “I will prime you for the upcoming exam by reviewing key concepts.”
  • A coach might say, “I will prime the team for the championship game by focusing on strategy and mental preparation.”
  • In a workshop, an instructor might say, “I will prime you with the basic skills before we move on to more advanced techniques.”

20. Ground

To provide someone with a solid foundation or fundamental knowledge in a particular subject or skill. “Ground” is often used to describe the initial stages of teaching or learning.

  • For example, a professor might say, “We need to ground our students in the principles of mathematics before moving on to complex equations.”
  • A trainer might say, “It’s important to ground new employees in the company’s policies and procedures.”
  • In a music lesson, a teacher might say, “Let’s start by grounding you in the basics of music theory.”

21. Lead

In the context of teaching, “lead” refers to guiding or showing someone the way. It can also mean taking charge or being in a position of authority in a teaching setting.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I will lead the class in a discussion on this topic.”
  • A mentor might advise, “You need to lead by example if you want your students to follow.”
  • In a school setting, a principal might say, “Our goal is to lead our students to success.”

22. Catechize

To “catechize” means to instruct or question someone, especially in a formal or religious setting. In teaching slang, it can refer to asking students specific questions to test their knowledge or understanding.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “I’m going to catechize you on the material we covered last week.”
  • In a classroom, a student might ask, “Why does the teacher always catechize us during quizzes?”
  • A teacher might explain, “Catechizing helps me assess how well students have grasped the concepts.”

23. Re-educate

In the context of teaching, “re-educate” means to teach someone again or provide further education on a particular topic.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I need to re-educate myself on this subject before teaching it to my students.”
  • In a discussion about education, someone might argue, “We need to prioritize the re-education of adults who lack necessary skills.”
  • A parent might say, “I’m planning to re-educate my child at home during summer break.”

24. Retrain

To “retrain” means to teach someone new skills or knowledge, typically in order to adapt to a new job or situation.

  • For instance, a supervisor might say, “We need to retrain our employees on the updated software.”
  • In a conversation about career changes, someone might mention, “I’m considering retraining in a different field.”
  • A coach might say, “We’re going to retrain the team on the fundamentals of the game.”

25. Habilitate

In teaching slang, “habilitate” can mean enabling or rehabilitating someone by teaching them skills or helping them overcome challenges.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Our goal is to habilitate students with special needs to become independent learners.”
  • In a discussion about education, someone might argue, “The purpose of education is to habilitate individuals for success in society.”
  • A mentor might say, “I’m here to habilitate and support you in reaching your goals.”

26. Instill

When a parent teaches their child good manners, they are trying to instill proper behavior.

  • A teacher might try to instill a love for reading in their students by regularly reading aloud to them.
  • A coach might instill a sense of discipline and teamwork in their athletes through rigorous training and team-building exercises.
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27. Impart

A mentor can impart wisdom and guidance to a mentee.

  • A professor might impart their expertise on a particular subject to their students through lectures and discussions.
  • A parent might impart life lessons to their children through storytelling and personal anecdotes.

28. Educify

A teacher might tell their students, “Let’s educify ourselves on the history of ancient civilizations.”

  • A parent might say, “I’m going to educify my kids about the importance of recycling.”
  • A friend might jokingly ask, “Can you educify me on how to play the guitar?”

29. Brainiac

In a classroom, a student who consistently gets the highest grades might be referred to as a brainiac.

  • A scientist who makes groundbreaking discoveries might be called a brainiac by their colleagues.
  • A trivia enthusiast who knows a lot of obscure facts might proudly identify themselves as a brainiac.

30. Wise up

A friend might say to someone who keeps making the same mistake, “It’s time to wise up and learn from your past errors.”

  • A mentor might tell their mentee, “You need to wise up and start taking your responsibilities seriously.”
  • A parent might encourage their child to wise up and make smarter choices in order to avoid negative consequences.

31. Foster

To foster something means to encourage its growth or development. In the context of teaching, it refers to creating an environment that nurtures learning and personal growth.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I want to foster a love for reading in my students.”
  • A parent might encourage their child’s artistic abilities by saying, “Let’s foster your talent by enrolling you in art classes.”
  • In a workplace setting, a manager might foster teamwork by organizing team-building activities.

32. Cultivate

To cultivate means to nurture and develop something, such as skills or relationships. In the context of teaching, it refers to the deliberate effort to help students develop their knowledge and abilities.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “We need to cultivate a love for learning in our students.”
  • A mentor might advise their mentee, “Cultivate strong relationships with your classmates and professors.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “We should cultivate a growth mindset to achieve our goals.”

33. Edutain

Edutain is a blend of the words “educate” and “entertain.” It refers to a teaching approach that combines educational content with entertainment value to engage and captivate learners.

  • For example, a teacher might use interactive games to edutain their students while teaching a difficult concept.
  • A children’s TV show that teaches math through songs and colorful animations can be described as edutainment.
  • A parent might say, “I try to find edutaining books for my child that make learning fun.”

34. Train up

To train up means to teach and prepare someone for a particular task or role. It often implies a more hands-on and practical approach to teaching.

  • For instance, a coach might say, “I need to train up my team for the upcoming competition.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might mention, “I was trained up by my previous employer in customer service skills.”
  • A parent might say, “I want to train up my child to be independent and responsible.”

35. School up

To school up means to educate and inform someone about a particular topic or subject. It can also imply a more informal or casual way of teaching.

  • For example, a friend might school up another friend about the latest trends in fashion.
  • A teacher might say, “I need to school up my students on the importance of environmental conservation.”
  • In a conversation about a specific hobby, someone might ask, “Can you school me up on how to play the guitar?”

36. Pass on

To pass on means to share knowledge or information with someone else. It can refer to teaching someone a specific skill or passing along information that may be useful.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I want to pass on my love of literature to my students.”
  • A mentor might say, “I have a lot of experience in this field, so I want to pass on my knowledge to you.”
  • A parent might pass on a family recipe to their child, saying, “I want to make sure this recipe is passed on for generations to come.”

37. Show the ropes

To show the ropes means to teach someone the basics or essentials of a particular task, job, or activity. It involves guiding someone through the necessary steps to become familiar with a process or skill.

  • For instance, a seasoned employee might show the ropes to a new hire, explaining the company’s procedures and expectations.
  • A coach might show the ropes to a new player, demonstrating the techniques and strategies of the game.
  • A parent might show the ropes to their child, teaching them how to ride a bike or tie their shoes.
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38. Fill in

To fill in means to provide someone with missing information or details about a particular topic or situation. It involves giving someone the necessary information to complete their understanding.

  • For example, a teacher might fill in their students on the details of an upcoming field trip, saying, “Let me fill you in on the itinerary for our trip next week.”
  • A coworker might fill in their colleague on a project they missed, saying, “I’ll fill you in on what happened while you were out.”
  • A friend might fill in another friend on the latest gossip, saying, “You won’t believe what happened last night. Let me fill you in.”

39. Clue in

To clue in means to inform or enlighten someone about a particular topic or situation. It involves giving someone the necessary information to understand or be aware of something.

  • For instance, a detective might clue in their partner on the latest developments in a case, saying, “I need to clue you in on what we’ve discovered.”
  • A friend might clue in another friend on a surprise party, saying, “I need to clue you in on the details of the surprise.”
  • A teacher might clue in their students on an upcoming test, saying, “I’m going to clue you in on what to study for the exam.”

40. Bring up to speed

To bring someone up to speed means to update them with the latest information or developments about a particular topic or situation. It involves catching someone up on what they may have missed or providing them with the necessary information to be current.

  • For example, a manager might bring their team up to speed on the progress of a project, saying, “Let me bring you up to speed on where we are.”
  • A friend might bring another friend up to speed on a recent breakup, saying, “I need to bring you up to speed on what happened between them.”
  • A parent might bring their child up to speed on a family situation, saying, “I want to bring you up to speed on what’s been going on at home.”

41. Break it down

When a teacher breaks it down, they are breaking a complex concept or topic into smaller, easier-to-understand parts.

  • For example, a math teacher might say, “Let me break down this equation step by step.”
  • A dance instructor might explain, “Now, let’s break down the choreography into smaller movements.”
  • In a cooking class, the chef might say, “I’ll break down the recipe into different stages for you to follow.”

42. Give a lesson

When someone gives a lesson, they are providing instruction or guidance on a specific topic or skill.

  • For instance, a music teacher might say, “Today, I’m going to give a lesson on playing the guitar.”
  • A driving instructor might explain, “I’ll give you a lesson on parallel parking.”
  • In a language class, the teacher might say, “Let’s start by giving a lesson on basic vocabulary.”

43. Break someone in

When someone is broken in, they are being trained or introduced to a new job, task, or situation.

  • For example, a manager might say, “We need to break in the new employee and show them the ropes.”
  • A coach might explain, “We’ll break you in slowly and gradually increase the intensity of the workouts.”
  • In the military, a sergeant might say, “It’s my job to break in the recruits and prepare them for combat.”

44. Show someone the way

When someone shows someone the way, they are providing guidance or direction to help them achieve a goal or navigate a situation.

  • For instance, a mentor might say, “I’ll show you the way to success.”
  • A teacher might explain, “Let me show you the way to solve this math problem.”
  • In a leadership role, someone might say, “It’s my responsibility to show my team the way and inspire them to reach their full potential.”

45. Hip someone to

When someone hips someone to something, they are informing or introducing them to a new idea, concept, or piece of information.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Let me hip you to this new restaurant I discovered.”
  • A teacher might explain, “I’m going to hip you to some interesting facts about ancient civilizations.”
  • In a music class, the instructor might say, “I’ll hip you to the history and evolution of jazz music.”