Top 23 Slang For Ten Dollar Bill – Meaning & Usage

From “sawbuck” to “Hamilton,” there are countless names for the ten dollar bill that you may not be familiar with. Curious to know what they are? Look no further! We’ve done the research and rounded up the top slang terms for the ten dollar bill. Get ready to expand your vocabulary and impress your friends with your knowledge of these quirky and creative nicknames for our beloved ten spot.

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1. Dimebag

This term refers to a ten-dollar bill. It is derived from the fact that a dime is worth ten cents, so a “dimebag” is slang for a ten-dollar bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I only have a dimebag left, so I can’t afford to buy lunch.”
  • In a conversation about money, a person might ask, “Do you have change for a dimebag?”
  • A friend might borrow money and promise to pay back, saying, “I’ll give you a dimebag next week, I promise.”

2. Tenneroonie

This slang term is used to refer to a ten-dollar bill. It combines the word “tenner,” which is slang for a ten-dollar bill, with the suffix “-oonie” for added emphasis or playfulness.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I found a tenneroonie in my pocket, lucky me!”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might mention, “I need to break a tenneroonie to pay for this coffee.”
  • A friend might ask to borrow money, saying, “Can you lend me a tenneroonie until payday?”

3. Ten-dollar note

This is a formal term used to refer to a ten-dollar bill. It emphasizes the fact that the bill is a form of currency issued by the government.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to exchange this ten-dollar note for smaller bills.”
  • In a discussion about different denominations of currency, a person might mention, “The ten-dollar note features a portrait of Alexander Hamilton.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Do you have any ten-dollar notes? I can give you change if you do.”

4. Tennerino

This slang term is used to refer to a ten-dollar bill. It adds the suffix “-ino” to the word “tenner,” which is slang for a ten-dollar bill.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I found a tennerino in my jacket pocket!”
  • In a conversation about money, a person might ask, “Can you break a tennerino for me?”
  • A friend might borrow money and promise to pay back, saying, “I’ll give you a tennerino next week, I swear.”

5. Ten-dollar piece

This term is used to refer to a ten-dollar bill. It emphasizes the fact that the bill is a form of currency worth ten dollars.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to get change for a ten-dollar piece.”
  • In a discussion about different denominations of currency, a person might mention, “The ten-dollar piece features various security features to prevent counterfeiting.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Do you have any ten-dollar pieces? I can give you change if you do.”

6. Ten-dollar greenback

This term refers to a ten-dollar bill in US currency. The word “greenback” is often used to describe paper money, which is typically green in color.

  • For example, “I only have a ten-dollar greenback left in my wallet.”
  • A person might say, “I need to break this ten-dollar greenback into smaller bills.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might mention, “I found a ten-dollar greenback on the street today.”

7. Ten-dollar billaroo

This slang term is a playful and rhyming way to refer to a ten-dollar bill.

  • For instance, “I owe you ten bucks. Here’s a ten-dollar billaroo.”
  • A person might say, “I found a ten-dollar billaroo in my jacket pocket.”
  • In a discussion about money, someone might ask, “Does anyone have change for a ten-dollar billaroo?”

8. Ten-dollar buck

This term is a colloquial way to refer to a ten-dollar bill. The word “buck” is often used to mean a dollar.

  • For example, “I need to withdraw some cash. Can I get a few ten-dollar bucks?”
  • A person might say, “I found a ten-dollar buck on the ground.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might mention, “I paid ten bucks for that item.”

9. Ten-dollar ducat

This slang term is a playful way to refer to a ten-dollar bill. The word “ducat” is used to mean money or currency.

  • For instance, “I need to exchange this ten-dollar ducat for smaller bills.”
  • A person might say, “I found a ten-dollar ducat in my coat pocket.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might ask, “Can you lend me a ten-dollar ducat?”

10. Ten-dollar saw

This term is a slang way to refer to a ten-dollar bill. The word “saw” is used to mean a dollar.

  • For example, “I need to break this ten-dollar saw into smaller bills.”
  • A person might say, “I found a ten-dollar saw in my wallet.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might mention, “I paid ten saws for that item.”

11. Sawbuck cabbage

This term refers to a ten dollar bill, with “sawbuck” being a slang term for a ten dollar bill and “cabbage” being a slang term for money in general.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to break this sawbuck cabbage into smaller bills.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might mention, “I found a sawbuck cabbage in my pocket.”
  • A cashier at a store might ask, “Do you have enough sawbuck cabbages to cover the cost?”

12. Sawbuck sawmill

This term also refers to a ten dollar bill, with “sawbuck” being a slang term for a ten dollar bill and “sawmill” adding a playful twist to the phrase.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m going to need some sawbuck sawmills for this shopping spree.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, a person might remark, “I managed to save a few sawbuck sawmills this month.”
  • A friend might jokingly ask, “Can you lend me a couple of sawbuck sawmills until payday?”

13. Sawbuck tenner

This term is another variation of “sawbuck” used to refer to a ten dollar bill, with “tenner” being a slang term for a ten dollar bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found a few sawbuck tenners in my jacket pocket.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might mention, “I need to exchange this sawbuck tenner for smaller bills.”
  • A cashier at a store might ask, “Do you have enough sawbuck tenners to cover the cost?”

14. Sawbuck blue

This term combines “sawbuck,” a slang term for a ten dollar bill, with “blue,” which is a colloquial term for money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m running low on sawbuck blues.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, a person might remark, “I managed to save a few sawbuck blues this week.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me some sawbuck blues until payday?”

15. Sawbuck sawtooth

This term also combines “sawbuck,” a slang term for a ten dollar bill, with “sawtooth” adding a playful twist to the phrase.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m going to need some sawbuck sawtooths for this night out.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might mention, “I found a few sawbuck sawtooths in my wallet.”
  • A friend might jokingly ask, “Can you lend me a couple of sawbuck sawtooths until payday?”

16. Sawbuck greenback

This term combines “sawbuck,” which is slang for a ten dollar bill, with “greenback,” a common term for U.S. currency. “Sawbuck greenback” simply refers to a ten dollar bill.

  • For example, “I only had a sawbuck greenback in my wallet, so I couldn’t afford the fancy restaurant.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break a sawbuck greenback for me?”
  • In a conversation about cash, someone might say, “I prefer using sawbuck greenbacks instead of credit cards.”

17. Sawbuck billfold

A “sawbuck” is slang for a ten dollar bill, and a “billfold” is another word for a wallet. “Sawbuck billfold” simply refers to a wallet that contains ten dollars.

  • For instance, “I reached into my sawbuck billfold to pay for my coffee.”
  • A person might say, “I need to find my sawbuck billfold before we leave.”
  • In a discussion about money management, someone might mention, “I always keep a sawbuck billfold for emergencies.”

18. Sawbuck cabbage patch

This slang term combines “sawbuck,” which is slang for a ten dollar bill, with “cabbage patch,” a playful term for money. “Sawbuck cabbage patch” simply refers to a ten dollar bill.

  • For example, “I found a sawbuck cabbage patch in my coat pocket.”
  • A person might say, “I need to withdraw some cash, preferably in sawbuck cabbage patches.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might mention, “I’m trying to save up a stack of sawbuck cabbage patches.”

19. Sawbuck sawmill green

This term combines “sawbuck,” which is slang for a ten dollar bill, with “sawmill green,” a playful term for money. “Sawbuck sawmill green” simply refers to a ten dollar bill.

  • For instance, “I had a stack of sawbuck sawmill greens in my wallet.”
  • A person might say, “I need to exchange this twenty for two sawbuck sawmill greens.”
  • In a discussion about cash, someone might mention, “I always carry a few sawbuck sawmill greens for emergencies.”

20. Sawbuck tenner blue

This term combines “sawbuck,” which is slang for a ten dollar bill, with “tenner,” a colloquial term for a ten dollar bill. “Sawbuck tenner blue” simply refers to a ten dollar bill.

  • For example, “I broke my sawbuck tenner blue to pay for lunch.”
  • A person might say, “I found a stack of sawbuck tenner blues in my jacket pocket.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I’m saving up for a vacation and have a few sawbuck tenner blues stashed away.”

21. Sawbuck

This term originated from the resemblance of the Roman numeral “X” (which represents ten) to the shape of a sawbuck, a type of sawhorse used in woodworking. It is a colloquial term used to refer to a ten-dollar bill.

  • For example, “I’ll pay you back with a sawbuck.”
  • A person might say, “I found a sawbuck on the street today.”
  • In a conversation about cash, someone might ask, “Do you have any sawbucks on you?”

22. Greenback

This term refers to paper currency, particularly the United States dollar bills, which are predominantly green in color. It is a slang term used to specifically refer to a ten-dollar bill.

  • For instance, “I need to break this twenty into two greenbacks.”
  • A person might say, “I only have a couple of greenbacks left.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might ask, “Can you lend me a greenback?”

23. Billfold

A billfold is a small folding case designed to hold paper currency, credit cards, and other personal items. In this context, it is a slang term used to refer to a ten-dollar bill.

  • For example, “I only have a single billfold left.”
  • A person might say, “I found a few billfolds in my old jacket.”
  • In a conversation about cash, someone might ask, “Do you have any billfolds on you?”
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