Top 37 Slang For Tend – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to staying up-to-date with the latest lingo, tend slang is where it’s at. Whether you’re trying to understand what your Gen Z coworker is saying or just want to impress your friends with some trendy vocabulary, we’ve got you covered. Our team has put together a list of the most popular and current slang terms for “tend” that will have you speaking like a pro in no time. So, buckle up and get ready to level up your slang game!

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1. Look after

This phrase means to watch over or care for someone or something. It implies a sense of responsibility and attentiveness.

  • For example, a parent might say, “Can you look after your little sister while I run errands?”
  • A pet owner might tell a friend, “I need someone to look after my dog while I’m on vacation.”
  • In a work setting, a supervisor might ask an employee, “Can you look after this project while I’m out of the office?”

2. Watch over

This phrase means to protect or keep a close watch on someone or something. It implies a sense of guardianship and vigilance.

  • For instance, a lifeguard might say, “I watch over the swimmers to ensure their safety.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “I will always watch over you and keep you safe.”
  • In a security context, a guard might say, “I’m here to watch over the premises and prevent any unauthorized access.”

3. Attend to

This phrase means to give attention to or deal with someone or something. It implies a sense of responsibility and promptness.

  • For example, a nurse might say, “I need to attend to my patients’ needs.”
  • A customer service representative might say, “I will attend to your request as soon as possible.”
  • In a household setting, a homeowner might say, “I need to attend to some repairs around the house.”

4. Care for

This phrase means to look after someone or something with care and concern. It implies a sense of nurturing and support.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “I care for my children’s well-being above all else.”
  • A caregiver might say, “I care for the elderly and ensure their comfort.”
  • In a healthcare context, a doctor might say, “I care for my patients and strive to improve their health.”

5. Nurture

This word means to nourish, support, and encourage the development of someone or something. It implies a sense of fostering growth and providing a nurturing environment.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I strive to nurture my students’ love for learning.”
  • A gardener might say, “I nurture the plants by providing them with proper care and attention.”
  • In a personal context, a friend might say, “I want to nurture our friendship and help each other grow.”

6. Mind

To “mind” something means to pay attention to it or be aware of it. It can also mean to take care of something or someone.

  • For example, someone might say, “Mind your own business,” meaning to not interfere in someone else’s affairs.
  • In a conversation about safety, someone might remind another person, “Mind your surroundings and stay alert.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Mind your manners and say thank you.”

7. Tend to

To “tend to” something means to take care of it or look after it. It can also mean to have a natural inclination or preference for something.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to tend to my garden,” meaning they need to take care of their plants.
  • In a discussion about responsibilities, someone might say, “I tend to my household chores every weekend.”
  • A person might say, “I tend to prefer action movies over romantic comedies.”

8. Foster

To “foster” something means to nurture or encourage its development. It can also mean to provide care and support for someone or something.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “We need to foster a love for reading in our students.”
  • In a conversation about animal welfare, someone might say, “We should foster homeless pets until they find permanent homes.”
  • A mentor might say, “It’s important to foster a growth mindset in our mentees.”

9. Support

To “support” someone or something means to provide assistance, encouragement, or backing. It can also mean to bear the weight of something or hold it up.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “I will support you in your decision no matter what.”
  • In a discussion about sports, someone might say, “We need to support our team by attending their games.”
  • A person might say, “I support the idea of renewable energy for a sustainable future.”

10. Maintain

To “maintain” something means to keep it in good condition or preserve its state. It can also mean to continue or uphold something.

  • For example, a homeowner might say, “I need to maintain my lawn by regularly mowing and watering it.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “It’s important to maintain open communication with your partner.”
  • A person might say, “I try to maintain a healthy lifestyle by exercising and eating nutritious food.”

11. Guard

To protect or keep a close eye on someone or something. “Guard” implies a sense of vigilance and defense.

  • For example, a parent might say to their child, “Guard your belongings while you’re at school.”
  • In a conversation about personal safety, someone might advise, “Always guard your personal information online.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you guard my spot in line while I grab a coffee?”

12. Protect

To ensure the safety and well-being of someone or something. “Protect” emphasizes the act of shielding from harm or danger.

  • For instance, a lifeguard’s job is to protect swimmers from drowning.
  • In a discussion about endangered species, someone might argue, “We need to protect these animals from extinction.”
  • A person might say, “I will do whatever it takes to protect my family.”

13. Serve

To fulfill a duty or responsibility towards someone or something. “Serve” implies a commitment to meeting the needs or desires of others.

  • For example, a waiter might say, “I am here to serve you and make your dining experience enjoyable.”
  • In a conversation about customer service, someone might say, “We should always strive to serve our customers with excellence.”
  • A person might express gratitude by saying, “Thank you for serving our community.”

14. Look out for

To be aware of potential dangers or threats and take action to prevent harm. “Look out for” suggests being vigilant and proactive in protecting someone or something.

  • For instance, a teacher might tell their students, “Look out for each other on the playground.”
  • In a discussion about neighborhood safety, someone might advise, “We should all look out for suspicious activity and report it.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll look out for you at the party and make sure you’re okay.”

15. Cherish

To hold something dear and show love or appreciation for it. “Cherish” implies a deep emotional attachment and a desire to protect and care for someone or something.

  • For example, a person might say, “I cherish the memories I have with my grandparents.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “It’s important to cherish your partner and make them feel valued.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “You are cherished and loved more than you know.”

16. Watch out for

This phrase is used to warn someone to be careful or vigilant about something. It implies that there may be a potential danger or problem that needs attention.

  • For example, “Watch out for that slippery patch of ice.”
  • A parent might say, “Watch out for cars when crossing the street.”
  • In a conversation about personal safety, someone might advise, “Always watch out for your surroundings.”

17. Keep an eye on

This phrase means to pay attention to or keep a close watch on something or someone. It implies the need for ongoing observation or supervision.

  • For instance, “Keep an eye on the stove while the soup simmers.”
  • A teacher might say, “Please keep an eye on your classmates while I step out.”
  • In a discussion about suspicious activity, someone might suggest, “We should keep an eye on that house.”

18. Take charge of

This phrase means to assume responsibility or leadership over a situation or task. It suggests being proactive and assertive in taking control.

  • For example, “Take charge of organizing the event.”
  • A supervisor might say, “I’m going to take charge of this project.”
  • In a discussion about decision-making, someone might assert, “It’s time for us to take charge of our own destiny.”

19. Be mindful of

This phrase means to be conscious or aware of something. It implies the need to pay attention and consider the importance or impact of a particular factor.

  • For instance, “Be mindful of your words when speaking to others.”
  • A teacher might say, “Please be mindful of the time and submit your assignments on schedule.”
  • In a conversation about personal health, someone might advise, “Be mindful of your diet and exercise regularly.”

20. Be attentive to

This phrase means to focus one’s attention on something or someone. It suggests actively listening or observing with intention.

  • For example, “Be attentive to the speaker during the presentation.”
  • A coach might say, “Be attentive to your teammates’ needs on the field.”
  • In a discussion about effective communication, someone might emphasize, “It’s important to be attentive to nonverbal cues.”

21. Be answerable for

To be held accountable for something or to accept the consequences of one’s actions. This phrase is often used in a professional or legal context.

  • For example, if a project fails, a manager might say, “I will be answerable for the outcome.”
  • In a court of law, a defendant might say, “I am answerable for my actions.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “You need to be answerable for your behavior.”

22. Be on top of

To be well-informed or knowledgeable about a particular subject or situation and to stay in control of it. This phrase is often used in a professional or organizational context.

  • For instance, a manager might say, “I need to be on top of the latest market trends.”
  • In a team meeting, a leader might say, “We all need to be on top of our tasks to meet the deadline.”
  • A teacher might advise their students, “Stay on top of your assignments and study regularly.”

23. Be on the lookout for

To actively search or be observant for something or someone. This phrase is often used to warn or inform others to be cautious or aware of a particular situation.

  • For example, a police officer might say, “Be on the lookout for a suspicious vehicle.”
  • A hiker might warn their companions, “Be on the lookout for snakes on the trail.”
  • A parent might remind their child, “Be on the lookout for cars when crossing the street.”

24. Be on the alert for

To be watchful and ready for any potential danger or threat. This phrase is often used to advise others to be cautious and aware of their surroundings.

  • For instance, during a storm, a weather forecaster might say, “Be on the alert for flash floods.”
  • A security guard might tell their colleagues, “Be on the alert for any suspicious activity.”
  • A coach might instruct their team, “Be on the alert for any changes in the opposing team’s strategy.”

25. Be on the watch for

To actively observe or be watchful for something or someone. This phrase is often used to advise others to be alert and attentive to a particular situation.

  • For example, a wildlife photographer might say, “Be on the watch for any rare bird species.”
  • A teacher might remind their students, “Be on the watch for any important announcements.”
  • A parent might caution their child, “Be on the watch for any signs of danger.”

26. Be on the guard for

This phrase means to be cautious and watchful for something potentially dangerous or harmful.

  • For example, “Be on the guard for pickpockets in crowded areas.”
  • A security officer might tell their team, “Be on the guard for any suspicious activity.”
  • A hiker might say, “When exploring the wilderness, always be on the guard for wildlife encounters.”

27. Be on the watch out for

This phrase means to be on the lookout or be aware of something.

  • For instance, “Be on the watch out for falling objects in the construction zone.”
  • A parent might say, “Be on the watch out for any signs of illness in your child.”
  • A driver might warn their passengers, “Be on the watch out for pedestrians crossing the road.”

28. Be on the watchful for

This phrase means to be watchful and observant for something.

  • For example, “Be on the watchful for any suspicious behavior in the neighborhood.”
  • A teacher might advise their students, “Be on the watchful for any mistakes in your work.”
  • A detective might instruct their team, “Be on the watchful for any clues or evidence at the crime scene.”

29. Keep safe

This phrase means to take precautions and ensure one’s safety.

  • For instance, “Keep safe by wearing a helmet while riding a bike.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Keep safe by not talking to strangers.”
  • A friend might say, “Keep safe during your travels by following the local laws and customs.”

30. Be there for

This phrase means to be present and available to help or support someone in need.

  • For example, “I’ll always be there for you when you need a shoulder to lean on.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll be there for you during your job interview for moral support.”
  • A parent might reassure their child, “No matter what happens, I’ll always be there for you.”

31. Keep tabs on

To keep a close watch on someone or something. It implies being aware of their actions or whereabouts.

  • For example, “I’ll keep tabs on the progress of the project and provide updates.”
  • In a conversation about a friend’s relationship, someone might say, “You should keep tabs on him to see if he’s being honest.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “I trust you, but I still need to keep tabs on your online activities.”

32. Supervise

To be in charge of a person or a process, ensuring that everything is done correctly and according to expectations.

  • For instance, “The teacher will supervise the students during the exam.”
  • In a workplace setting, a manager might say, “I will supervise the team to ensure the project is completed on time.”
  • A babysitter might explain to the parents, “I will supervise the children to make sure they stay safe.”

33. Take care of business

To complete necessary tasks or fulfill responsibilities in an efficient and effective manner.

  • For example, “I need to take care of business before I can relax.”
  • In a conversation about household chores, someone might say, “I’ll take care of business and clean the kitchen.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “Let’s go out there and take care of business on the field.”

34. Be watchful of

To be cautious and attentive, paying close attention to someone or something.

  • For instance, “Be watchful of any suspicious activity in the neighborhood.”
  • In a discussion about personal safety, someone might say, “Always be watchful of your surroundings.”
  • A tour guide might advise the group, “Be watchful of any wildlife while we hike through the forest.”

35. Be protective of

To have a strong desire to keep someone or something safe from harm or danger.

  • For example, “She is very protective of her younger siblings.”
  • In a conversation about personal boundaries, someone might say, “I’m protective of my personal space.”
  • A pet owner might explain, “I’m protective of my dog and always make sure she is safe.”

36. Be nurturing towards

To be nurturing towards someone means to take care of them, provide support, and show them love and affection. It implies a sense of tenderness and compassion.

  • For example, a mother might be nurturing towards her child by feeding, comforting, and protecting them.
  • In a friendship, one person might be nurturing towards the other by offering emotional support and being there for them during tough times.
  • A teacher can be nurturing towards their students by creating a safe and supportive learning environment.
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37. Be supportive of

To be supportive of someone means to offer them encouragement, help, and understanding. It involves standing by them and providing assistance when needed.

  • For instance, a friend can be supportive of another friend by listening to their problems and offering advice or a shoulder to lean on.
  • In a work setting, colleagues can be supportive of each other by collaborating, sharing ideas, and helping one another succeed.
  • A coach can be supportive of their team by motivating them, providing guidance, and celebrating their achievements.