Top 84 Slang For Tentatively – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing uncertainty or hesitation, having the right slang can make all the difference in conveying your message. In this article, we’ve rounded up some of the most popular and useful slang terms for tentatively navigating conversations and decisions. Whether you’re dipping your toes into a new trend or cautiously feeling out a situation, we’ve got you covered with the perfect words to help you navigate the uncertain waters of everyday life. So, buckle up and get ready to add some fresh new vocabulary to your repertoire!

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1. Maybe

This word is used to express uncertainty or hesitation about something. It suggests that a decision or answer is not definite or final.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m not sure if I can make it to the party, but maybe.”
  • In a discussion about future plans, one person might say, “I’m considering going on vacation next month, but maybe I’ll wait until the following month.”
  • Another might suggest, “Maybe we can meet up for lunch tomorrow if you’re available.”

2. Kinda

This slang word is a shortened form of “kind of” and is used to express a moderate or partial agreement or similarity.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m kinda tired,” to indicate that they are somewhat tired.
  • In a conversation about a movie, a person might say, “I kinda liked it, but I wasn’t a big fan of the ending.”
  • Another might express their opinion by saying, “I’m kinda on the fence about that idea.”

3. Sorta

Similar to “kinda,” this word is a shortened form of “sort of” and is used to express a partial agreement or similarity.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m sorta interested in that new book,” to indicate a moderate level of interest.
  • In a discussion about a recent event, a person might say, “I sorta remember hearing about that in the news.”
  • Another might express a half-hearted agreement by saying, “I sorta agree with what you’re saying, but I have some reservations.”

4. Possibly

This word is used to indicate that something is within the realm of possibility or that there is a chance of it happening.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll possibly be able to attend the meeting, but I’m not certain yet.”
  • In a conversation about future plans, a person might say, “I’m considering possibly moving to a different city next year.”
  • Another might suggest, “Possibly we can find a solution to this problem if we work together.”

5. Perhaps

This word is used to express uncertainty or a suggestion that something may be true or possible.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll perhaps be able to join you for dinner, but I’ll let you know for sure later.”
  • In a discussion about a decision, a person might say, “Perhaps we should consider other options before making a final choice.”
  • Another might suggest, “Perhaps we can find a compromise that satisfies both parties.”

6. Seemingly

This word is used to describe something that appears to be a certain way, but may not necessarily be true or definite.

  • For example, “The seemingly happy couple announced their separation.”
  • A person might say, “She had a seemingly endless supply of energy.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might comment, “The seemingly innocent comment sparked a heated debate.”

7. In a way

This phrase is used to indicate that something is true or applies to a certain extent, but not completely or definitively.

  • For instance, “In a way, I understand why she made that decision.”
  • A person might say, “In a way, I feel like I’ve accomplished my goals.”
  • In a discussion about a complex issue, someone might comment, “In a way, both sides have valid points.”

8. On the fence

This phrase is used to describe a person who is unsure or undecided about something, often referring to a decision or opinion.

  • For example, “I’m on the fence about whether to go on vacation this year.”
  • A person might say, “I’m on the fence about which candidate to vote for.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might comment, “I’m on the fence about whether to support this policy.”

9. Indecisive

This word is used to describe a person who has difficulty making decisions or is hesitant to commit to a particular course of action.

  • For instance, “She’s so indecisive, it takes her forever to choose what to wear.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling indecisive about which restaurant to go to for dinner.”
  • In a group discussion about a project, someone might comment, “We need to make a decision, let’s not be indecisive.”

10. Hesitant

This word is used to describe a person who is slow or uncertain in taking action or making a decision.

  • For example, “He was hesitant to accept the job offer.”
  • A person might say, “I’m hesitant to try that new restaurant because of mixed reviews.”
  • In a discussion about a risky investment, someone might comment, “Investors are hesitant to put their money into this venture.”

11. Wavering

This term refers to being unsure or hesitant about a decision or course of action. It implies a lack of conviction or confidence.

  • For example, “She is wavering between two job offers and can’t decide which one to accept.”
  • In a discussion about political candidates, someone might say, “His wavering stance on key issues is causing doubt among voters.”
  • A person might admit, “I’ve been wavering on whether or not to go on that trip, but I think I’ve finally made up my mind.”

12. Doubtfully

When someone is feeling doubtful or skeptical, they are uncertain about the truth or validity of something. It suggests a lack of trust or confidence in a particular situation or statement.

  • For instance, “She looked doubtfully at the email, wondering if it was a scam.”
  • In a conversation about a new product, someone might say, “I’m doubtfully optimistic about its effectiveness.”
  • A person might express their doubt by saying, “I doubtfully believe that he will follow through on his promises.”

13. Tentatively

This word describes an action or decision that is done with caution or hesitation. It suggests a lack of firmness or confidence.

  • For example, “She tentatively reached out to shake his hand, unsure of his reaction.”
  • In a discussion about making plans, someone might say, “Let’s tentatively set a date and confirm later.”
  • A person might express their uncertainty by saying, “I’m tentatively considering the job offer, but I need more information before making a final decision.”

14. Not fully committed

When someone is not fully committed, they are not fully dedicated or enthusiastic about something. It implies a lack of wholeheartedness or passion.

  • For instance, “She was not fully committed to the project, and it showed in her lack of effort.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “He’s not fully committed to our future together.”
  • A person might confess, “I’m not fully committed to this diet, so I allow myself occasional indulgences.”

15. With reservations

When someone does something with reservations, they do it with caution or doubt. It suggests that they have concerns or hesitations about a particular action or decision.

  • For example, “She agreed to the plan, but with reservations about its feasibility.”
  • In a discussion about a proposed policy, someone might say, “I support the idea, but with reservations about its potential impact.”
  • A person might express their caution by saying, “I’m willing to try it, but with reservations about the potential risks involved.”

16. With caution

This phrase is used to indicate that something is being done carefully or with hesitation. It implies that one is being cautious and aware of potential risks or consequences.

  • For example, “Approach that situation with caution, as it could be dangerous.”
  • A person might say, “I would proceed with caution when dealing with that person, as they have a history of being unpredictable.”
  • In a discussion about making decisions, someone might advise, “It’s always wise to take things with caution and consider all possible outcomes.”

17. In a tentative manner

This phrase is used to describe an action or behavior that is done with hesitation or uncertainty. It suggests that one is not fully committed or confident in their actions.

  • For instance, “She approached the stage in a tentative manner, unsure of how the audience would react.”
  • A person might say, “I’m taking small steps and moving forward in a tentative manner, as I’m not yet sure if this is the right path for me.”
  • In a discussion about trying new things, someone might advise, “Start with small, tentative steps and gradually build up your confidence.”

18. With a grain of salt

This phrase is used to suggest that something should be taken with skepticism or doubt. It implies that the information or statement may not be entirely accurate or reliable.

  • For example, “Take his claims with a grain of salt, as he tends to exaggerate.”
  • A person might say, “I heard a rumor about that, but I’m taking it with a grain of salt until I have more reliable information.”
  • In a discussion about trusting sources, someone might advise, “Always consider the source and take everything you hear with a grain of salt.”

19. With a pinch of doubt

This phrase is used to indicate that there is a slight skepticism or uncertainty about something. It suggests that one is not completely convinced or confident in the accuracy or truthfulness of a statement or claim.

  • For instance, “I believe him, but there’s still a pinch of doubt in the back of my mind.”
  • A person might say, “I’m willing to give it a try, but I have a pinch of doubt about its effectiveness.”
  • In a discussion about accepting new ideas, someone might advise, “Keep an open mind, but always maintain a pinch of doubt to avoid blindly accepting everything.”

20. With a hint of uncertainty

This phrase is used to describe a situation or action that is accompanied by a slight feeling of doubt or uncertainty. It suggests that one is not completely sure or confident about something.

  • For example, “She spoke with a hint of uncertainty, unsure of how her idea would be received.”
  • A person might say, “I’m willing to give it a try, but there’s still a hint of uncertainty in the back of my mind.”
  • In a discussion about making decisions, someone might advise, “It’s okay to have a hint of uncertainty, as long as you carefully consider all the options before choosing.”

21. With a touch of hesitation

This phrase is used to describe a situation or action that is done with a slight sense of doubt or hesitation. It implies a lack of complete confidence or conviction.

  • For example, “He agreed to the plan with a touch of hesitation in his voice.”
  • In a discussion about making a decision, someone might say, “I’m tentatively leaning towards option B.”
  • A person might describe their feelings about a new job opportunity by saying, “I’m tentatively excited, but also a bit nervous.”

22. With a shadow of doubt

This expression is used to convey a sense of uncertainty or skepticism about something. It suggests that there is a small amount of doubt or suspicion surrounding a particular situation or statement.

  • For instance, “She accepted his explanation, but with a shadow of doubt in her mind.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I believe him, but with a shadow of doubt.”
  • A person might express their uncertainty about the outcome of a project by saying, “I’m proceeding with a shadow of doubt, but I’ll give it my best.”

23. With a dash of skepticism

This phrase indicates a small amount of doubt or skepticism towards something. It suggests that there is a hint of disbelief or questioning in one’s attitude or approach.

  • For example, “He accepted the offer, but with a dash of skepticism.”
  • In a discussion about a new scientific discovery, someone might say, “I’m approaching this with a dash of skepticism until more evidence is presented.”
  • A person might describe their reaction to an unbelievable story by saying, “I listened to her with a dash of skepticism, unsure if I should believe her.”

24. With a sprinkle of hesitation

This expression conveys a sense of hesitation or uncertainty about something. It suggests that there is a small amount of doubt or indecision in one’s actions or decisions.

  • For instance, “She agreed to the plan, but with a sprinkle of hesitation.”
  • In a conversation about trying a new activity, someone might say, “I’m willing to give it a try, but with a sprinkle of hesitation.”
  • A person might describe their feelings about a new relationship by saying, “I’m interested, but with a sprinkle of hesitation due to past experiences.”

25. With a tinge of uncertainty

This phrase indicates a slight sense of uncertainty or doubt about something. It suggests that there is a small amount of hesitation or lack of complete confidence in one’s actions or beliefs.

  • For example, “He made the decision, but with a tinge of uncertainty in his voice.”
  • In a discussion about a future plan, someone might say, “I’m proceeding with a tinge of uncertainty, unsure of the potential outcomes.”
  • A person might describe their feelings about a new opportunity by saying, “I’m excited, but with a tinge of uncertainty about the challenges ahead.”

26. With a smidgen of doubt

When someone is unsure about something, but only to a small degree. It implies a slight lack of confidence or conviction.

  • For example, “I’m going to say yes, but with a smidgen of doubt.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I agree, but with a smidgen of doubt in the back of my mind.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you recommend this restaurant? I heard mixed reviews, but with just a smidgen of doubt, I’m willing to give it a try.”

27. With a modicum of hesitation

When someone feels hesitant or reluctant about something, but only to a small degree. It suggests a minor reservation or uneasiness.

  • For instance, “I’ll agree to go, but with a modicum of hesitation.”
  • In a conversation about a risky decision, someone might say, “I’m willing to take the leap, but with a modicum of hesitation.”
  • A person might express, “I accepted the job offer, but with a modicum of hesitation about the long hours.”

28. With a shred of skepticism

When someone has doubts or skepticism about something, but only to a small degree. It implies a mild questioning or disbelief.

  • For example, “I’ll believe it when I see it, but with just a shred of skepticism.”
  • In a discussion about a new product, someone might say, “I’m interested, but with a shred of skepticism about its effectiveness.”
  • A person might express, “I trust her, but with a shred of skepticism about her promises.”

29. With a sliver of uncertainty

When someone feels uncertain or doubtful about something, but only to a very small degree. It suggests a minimal lack of confidence or conviction.

  • For instance, “I think it will work, but with a sliver of uncertainty.”
  • In a conversation about a decision, someone might say, “I’m leaning towards option A, but with a sliver of uncertainty about its potential risks.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you explain this concept? I understand most of it, but with a sliver of uncertainty about one aspect.”

30. With a hint of skepticism

When someone has a slight amount of doubt or skepticism about something. It implies a cautious or questioning attitude without strong disbelief.

  • For example, “I’m open to the idea, but with just a hint of skepticism.”
  • In a discussion about a claim, someone might say, “I’m willing to consider it, but with a hint of skepticism until I see more evidence.”
  • A person might express, “I trust him, but with a hint of skepticism about his ability to deliver on his promises.”

31. With a touch of doubt

This phrase is used to express a slight sense of doubt or uncertainty about something.

  • For example, “She agreed to the plan with a touch of doubt in her voice.”
  • In a conversation about making a decision, someone might say, “I’m tentatively leaning towards option A, but with a touch of doubt.”
  • A person might describe their thoughts on a new idea by saying, “I’m tentatively interested, but with a touch of doubt.”

32. With a bit of hesitation

This phrase indicates a slight hesitation or reluctance to fully commit to something.

  • For instance, “He agreed to help, but with a bit of hesitation in his voice.”
  • In a discussion about trying something new, someone might say, “I’m tentatively willing to give it a try, but with a bit of hesitation.”
  • A person might express their feelings about a potential plan by saying, “I’m tentatively on board, but with a bit of hesitation.”

33. With a bit of doubt

This phrase suggests a small amount of doubt or skepticism about something.

  • For example, “She accepted the invitation, but with a bit of doubt in her mind.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I’m tentatively open to different perspectives, but with a bit of doubt.”
  • A person might express their uncertainty about a decision by saying, “I’m tentatively considering it, but with a bit of doubt.”

34. With a bit of uncertainty

This phrase conveys a sense of uncertainty or vagueness about something.

  • For instance, “He agreed to the terms, but with a bit of uncertainty in his voice.”
  • In a discussion about future plans, someone might say, “I’m tentatively interested, but with a bit of uncertainty about the details.”
  • A person might describe their feelings about a new opportunity by saying, “I’m tentatively excited, but with a bit of uncertainty.”

35. With a hint of hesitation

This phrase indicates a slight reluctance or hesitation in accepting or agreeing to something.

  • For example, “She said yes, but with a hint of hesitation in her voice.”
  • In a conversation about taking a risk, someone might say, “I’m tentatively willing to try it, but with a hint of hesitation.”
  • A person might express their reservations about a decision by saying, “I’m tentatively on board, but with a hint of hesitation.”

36. With a tad of doubt

This phrase is used to express a small amount of uncertainty or hesitation about something. It suggests that the person is not completely sure about their statement or decision.

  • For example, “I think I’ll go to the party tonight, with a tad of doubt.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll try this new restaurant, but with a tad of doubt about the quality of the food.”
  • Another might say, “I’ll lend you some money, but with a tad of doubt that you’ll pay me back.”

37. With a tad of uncertainty

This phrase indicates a slight lack of confidence or clarity about something. It suggests that the person is unsure or hesitant about their knowledge or understanding of a particular situation.

  • For instance, “I’ll give it a try, with a tad of uncertainty.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t promise I’ll be there, with a tad of uncertainty about my schedule.”
  • Another might say, “I’ll attempt to fix it, but with a tad of uncertainty about my skills.”

38. With a tad of hesitation

This phrase suggests a small amount of reluctance or indecision. It indicates that the person is not completely confident or comfortable with their choice or action.

  • For example, “I’ll accept the offer, with a tad of hesitation.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll join the team, but with a tad of hesitation about my abilities.”
  • Another might say, “I’ll agree to the plan, but with a tad of hesitation about its feasibility.”

39. With a tad of skepticism

This phrase implies a small amount of doubt or disbelief. It suggests that the person is questioning the validity or truth of a statement or claim.

  • For instance, “I’ll believe it when I see it, with a tad of skepticism.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll trust you, but with a tad of skepticism about your intentions.”
  • Another might say, “I’ll consider your proposal, but with a tad of skepticism about its potential success.”

40. With a tad of reservation

This phrase indicates a slight hesitation or caution about something. It suggests that the person is not fully committed or enthusiastic about a particular decision or action.

  • For example, “I’ll agree to the plan, with a tad of reservation.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll support the idea, but with a tad of reservation about its long-term effects.”
  • Another might say, “I’ll give it a try, but with a tad of reservation about its practicality.”

41. With a tad of indecision

This phrase is used to describe someone who is unsure or hesitant about a decision or action they are about to take.

  • For example, “She approached the stage with a tad of indecision, unsure if she should perform.”
  • In a discussion about career choices, someone might say, “I’m considering a few options, but I’m still with a tad of indecision.”
  • A person might describe their thought process by saying, “I weighed the pros and cons, but I’m still with a tad of indecision.”

42. With a tad of wavering

This phrase is used to describe someone who is uncertain or hesitant and is not fully committed to a decision or action.

  • For instance, “He answered the question with a tad of wavering, unsure if his response was the right one.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “I’ve been with a tad of wavering about whether to break up or give it another try.”
  • A person might express their doubts by saying, “I’ve been with a tad of wavering about accepting the job offer.”

43. With a tad of tentativeness

This phrase is used to describe someone who is unsure or hesitant about their actions or decisions.

  • For example, “She approached the stage with a tad of tentativeness, unsure if she would be able to perform well.”
  • In a discussion about trying new things, someone might say, “I’m with a tad of tentativeness about skydiving, but I still want to give it a try.”
  • A person might express their uncertainty by saying, “I’m with a tad of tentativeness about moving to a new city.”

44. With a tad of doubtfulness

This phrase is used to describe someone who is unsure or skeptical about something.

  • For instance, “He listened to the proposal with a tad of doubtfulness, unsure if it would be successful.”
  • In a conversation about a new product, someone might say, “I’m with a tad of doubtfulness about its effectiveness.”
  • A person might express their skepticism by saying, “I’m with a tad of doubtfulness about his intentions.”

45. With a tad of hesitancy

This phrase is used to describe someone who is hesitant or unsure about their actions or decisions.

  • For example, “She took the first step with a tad of hesitancy, unsure if she was making the right choice.”
  • In a discussion about trying new foods, someone might say, “I’m with a tad of hesitancy about tasting exotic dishes.”
  • A person might express their uncertainty by saying, “I’m with a tad of hesitancy about joining the club.”

46. In a sense

This phrase is used to indicate that something is partially true or valid, but not entirely.

  • For example, “In a sense, he was right about the issue, but there were other factors to consider.”
  • When discussing a controversial topic, one might say, “In a sense, both sides have valid points.”
  • A person reflecting on their past actions might say, “In a sense, I was trying to find myself during that time.”

47. Somewhat

This word is used to indicate that something is not fully or completely true, accurate, or effective.

  • For instance, “The movie was somewhat disappointing, but it had a few redeeming qualities.”
  • When describing someone’s appearance, one might say, “She’s somewhat tall for her age.”
  • A person discussing their level of expertise might say, “I’m somewhat familiar with that subject, but I wouldn’t consider myself an expert.”

48. Allegedly

This word is used to indicate that something is claimed to be true or to have happened, but there may be doubts or uncertainty surrounding it.

  • For example, “The suspect allegedly committed the crime, but there is still an ongoing investigation.”
  • When discussing rumors, one might say, “He’s allegedly dating a famous actress.”
  • A news article might state, “The company allegedly engaged in fraudulent activities to boost their profits.”

49. Ostensibly

This word is used to indicate that something appears to be true or to have a particular quality, but there may be hidden motives or alternative explanations.

  • For instance, “He ostensibly took the job for the higher salary, but some speculate that there are other reasons.”
  • When describing someone’s behavior, one might say, “She was ostensibly friendly, but there was a hint of insincerity.”
  • A person discussing a political decision might say, “The policy change was ostensibly for the benefit of the citizens, but critics argue it serves other interests.”

50. Supposedly

This word is used to indicate that something is believed or assumed to be true, but there may be doubts or skepticism.

  • For example, “The package was supposedly delivered yesterday, but I haven’t received it.”
  • When discussing urban legends, one might say, “There’s a supposedly haunted house at the end of the street.”
  • A person questioning a claim might say, “He’s supposedly an expert in the field, but I haven’t seen any evidence of his expertise.”

51. Presumptively

This word is used to describe something that is assumed or believed to be true, but without concrete evidence or proof. It suggests a tentative or speculative nature.

  • For example, “He was presumptively named the winner before the final results were announced.”
  • In a legal context, one might say, “The defendant is presumptively innocent until proven guilty.”
  • A news article might state, “The new policy is presumptively aimed at reducing traffic congestion.”

52. Putatively

This word is used to describe something that is believed or regarded as true, although it may not be proven or confirmed. It implies a tentative or uncertain nature.

  • For instance, “The putatively haunted house has attracted many curious visitors.”
  • In a scientific discussion, one might say, “The putatively new species of insect has yet to be officially classified.”
  • A news headline might read, “The putatively safe product is now under investigation.”

53. Hypothetically

This word is used to describe something that is imagined or proposed as a possibility, without assuming it to be true or factual. It suggests a speculative or hypothetical nature.

  • For example, “Hypothetically, if money were no object, where would you travel?”
  • In a philosophical debate, one might say, “Hypothetically speaking, does free will exist?”
  • A teacher might ask, “Hypothetically, what would happen if we removed all the bees from the ecosystem?”

54. Conditionally

This word is used to describe something that is dependent on certain conditions or requirements. It suggests a tentative or provisional nature.

  • For instance, “The offer is conditionally valid until the end of the month.”
  • In a contract negotiation, one might say, “We are willing to agree conditionally, pending further discussions.”
  • A coach might state, “Your playing time will be determined conditionally based on your performance.”

55. Provisionally

This word is used to describe something that is done or agreed upon for the time being, but subject to change or further confirmation. It suggests a tentative or interim nature.

  • For example, “She was provisionally accepted into the program, pending submission of the required documents.”
  • In a sports competition, one might say, “The team is provisionally ranked first until the final results are calculated.”
  • A government official might announce, “The new law is provisionally in effect until a final decision is reached.”

56. Temporarily

This word is used to indicate that something is only for a short period of time and not permanent. It suggests that the situation or action is subject to change or may be revisited.

  • For example, “I’m temporarily staying at my friend’s house while I look for an apartment.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m temporarily taking on this role until we find a permanent replacement.”
  • In a work context, a manager might say, “We’re temporarily changing the office hours to accommodate the new project.”

57. For now

This phrase means that something is true or valid at the present moment, but may change in the future. It implies that the current situation is not final or definitive.

  • For instance, “I’ll use this laptop for now until I can buy a new one.”
  • A person might say, “For now, let’s focus on finishing this task before moving on to the next one.”
  • In a discussion about future plans, someone might suggest, “For now, let’s just enjoy the present and not worry too much about what’s to come.”

58. For the moment

This phrase is similar to “for now” and implies that something is true or applicable at the present time, but may change in the future. It suggests a temporary state or condition.

  • For example, “I’m happy with my current job for the moment, but I might consider other opportunities later.”
  • A person might say, “For the time being, let’s focus on improving our communication skills.”
  • In a discussion about travel plans, someone might suggest, “For the moment, let’s explore local destinations before venturing abroad.”

59. For the time being

This phrase is used to indicate that something is only valid or applicable for the present period and may change in the future. It suggests a temporary arrangement or condition.

  • For instance, “We’ll use the conference room for the time being until the new office is ready.”
  • A person might say, “For the time being, let’s stick to the current schedule and make adjustments if necessary.”
  • In a discussion about project timelines, someone might suggest, “For now, let’s set a deadline for the time being and reassess as we progress.”

60. Probably

This word suggests a high possibility or likelihood of something happening or being true, but it is not definite or guaranteed. It indicates a tentative or speculative statement.

  • For example, “I’ll probably go to the party, but I’m not 100% sure yet.”
  • Someone might say, “It will probably rain later, so bring an umbrella just in case.”
  • In a discussion about future plans, a person might suggest, “I’ll probably take a vacation next month, but I need to check my schedule first.”

61. Potentially

This word is used to indicate that something is possible or could happen, but it is not certain. It suggests a level of uncertainty or speculation.

  • For example, “I might potentially go to the party tonight.”
  • A person discussing future plans might say, “I’m potentially thinking about traveling next summer.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We’re potentially looking at expanding our product line.”

62. Roughly

This word is used to give a general or approximate value or estimate. It suggests that the exact amount or value is not known.

  • For instance, “I have roughly 20 dollars in my wallet.”
  • A person describing the size of a crowd might say, “There were roughly 100 people at the concert.”
  • In a discussion about time, someone might say, “It’s roughly 3 o’clock.”

63. More or less

This phrase is used to indicate that something is close to or approximately a certain value or condition. It implies that there may be some variation, but the general idea or amount is accurate.

  • For example, “The project will take more or less a month to complete.”
  • A person describing a temperature might say, “It’s more or less 70 degrees outside.”
  • In a conversation about a budget, someone might say, “We have more or less $500 to spend on this project.”

64. Vaguely

This word is used to describe something that is not clearly or precisely defined or understood. It suggests a lack of specific details or knowledge.

  • For instance, “I vaguely remember meeting him at a party.”
  • A person describing a dream might say, “I had a vaguely unsettling dream last night.”
  • In a discussion about a book, someone might say, “The ending was left somewhat vaguely explained.”

65. Indirectly

This word is used to describe something that is not stated or expressed directly, but is instead implied or suggested. It suggests a more subtle or indirect way of conveying information.

  • For example, “He indirectly hinted at his true feelings.”
  • A person describing a conversation might say, “She indirectly mentioned her upcoming vacation.”
  • In a discussion about influence, someone might say, “He indirectly impacted the decision-making process.”

66. Ambiguously

When someone speaks ambiguously, they are intentionally being vague or unclear with their words.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m not sure if I can make it to the party, I have some things to take care of,” when they actually mean they don’t want to go.
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might argue, “The politician’s statement was intentionally ambiguous to avoid taking a clear stance.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t want to commit to any plans yet, let’s keep it ambiguous for now.”

67. Hesitantly

When someone acts hesitantly, they are showing hesitation or reluctance to do something.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I hesitantly agreed to go on the roller coaster, even though I was scared.”
  • In a conversation about trying a new food, someone might say, “I hesitantly took a bite, unsure if I would like the taste.”
  • A person might act hesitantly when asked to make a decision, saying, “I’m not sure, let me think about it,” before giving an answer.
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68. Dubiously

When someone acts dubiously, they are expressing doubt or skepticism about something.

  • For example, a person might say, “I dubiously accepted his explanation, as it didn’t seem believable.”
  • In a discussion about a dubious claim, someone might argue, “The evidence presented is dubiously sourced and lacks credibility.”
  • A person might give a dubious look when presented with an unbelievable story, signaling their skepticism.

69. Uncertainly

When someone acts uncertainly, they are displaying a lack of confidence or assurance in their actions or words.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I walked uncertainly across the rickety bridge, afraid it might collapse.”
  • In a conversation about making a decision, someone might say, “I’m uncertainly leaning towards option A, but I’m not completely sure.”
  • A person might act uncertainly when asked to speak in public, showing signs of nervousness and hesitation.

70. Waveringly

When someone acts waveringly, they are showing indecision or fluctuation in their actions or decisions.

  • For example, a person might say, “I waveringly chose the red dress, but then changed my mind and went with the blue.”
  • In a discussion about changing opinions, someone might say, “He has been waveringly supportive of the new policy, expressing both approval and concerns.”
  • A person might act waveringly when asked to choose between two options, struggling to make a definitive choice.

71. On the edge

When someone is “on the edge,” it means they are unsure or hesitant about a decision or action. It implies a state of being close to making a choice, but still unsure.

  • For example, “I’m on the edge about whether to accept the job offer.”
  • In a discussion about taking risks, someone might say, “I love living on the edge and trying new things.”
  • A person might admit, “I’m on the edge of committing to a new hobby, but I’m not sure if I’ll stick with it.”

72. On the brink

When someone is “on the brink,” it means they are very close to making a decision or taking action. It implies being at the point of readiness or about to reach a critical moment.

  • For instance, “I’m on the brink of quitting my job and starting my own business.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “We were on the brink of breaking up, but we decided to work things out.”
  • A person might confess, “I’m on the brink of making a major life change, and it’s both exciting and nerve-wracking.”

73. On the cusp

When someone is “on the cusp,” it means they are almost reaching a point or achievement. It implies being on the verge of something significant or just about to cross a threshold.

  • For example, “She’s on the cusp of becoming a famous singer with her latest album.”
  • In a discussion about technological advancements, someone might say, “We’re on the cusp of a major breakthrough in artificial intelligence.”
  • A person might proudly state, “I’m on the cusp of graduating college, and I can’t wait to start my career.”

74. On the verge

When someone is “on the verge,” it means they are close to a particular state or action. It implies being on the brink of something happening or reaching a certain point.

  • For instance, “I’m on the verge of tears after watching that emotional movie.”
  • In a conversation about quitting a bad habit, someone might say, “I’m on the verge of giving up smoking.”
  • A person might admit, “I’m on the verge of a mental breakdown, and I need to take a step back to prioritize my well-being.”

75. On the precipice

When someone is “on the precipice,” it means they are at a critical point or about to make a decision. It implies being on the edge of a significant change or about to take a decisive action.

  • For example, “She’s on the precipice of starting her own business and leaving her corporate job.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “I’m on the precipice of taking a leap of faith and pursuing my passion.”
  • A person might express, “I feel like I’m on the precipice of a major life shift, and it’s both terrifying and exhilarating.”

76. Maybe so

This phrase is used to express uncertainty or a lack of commitment to a particular statement or idea. It suggests that something is not definite and leaves room for other possibilities.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Are you coming to the party tonight?” a response might be, “Maybe so, I’m not sure yet.”
  • In a discussion about future plans, one might say, “I’m considering taking a trip next month, but maybe so, maybe not.”
  • A person expressing hesitation about a decision might say, “I’m leaning towards going, but maybe so, maybe not.”

77. In limbo

This phrase is used to describe a situation where there is no clear resolution or decision. It suggests being stuck or suspended in a state of uncertainty or indecision.

  • For instance, if someone is waiting for a job offer and hasn’t heard back yet, they might say, “I’m still in limbo, waiting to hear back from the company.”
  • In a discussion about a relationship that is on the rocks, one might say, “Our relationship is in limbo right now. We’re not sure if we want to stay together or break up.”
  • A person describing a project that has been put on hold might say, “The project is currently in limbo until we receive further instructions.”

78. Doubtful

This term is used to express skepticism or a lack of belief in something. It suggests that something is not likely to happen or be true.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you think it will rain tomorrow?” a response might be, “I’m doubtful, the forecast doesn’t show any rain.”
  • In a discussion about the chances of winning a lottery, one might say, “The odds are so low, it’s doubtful anyone will win.”
  • A person expressing skepticism about a claim might say, “I find that story doubtful, it doesn’t seem very plausible.”

79. Unclear

This term is used to describe something that is not clear, definite, or easy to understand. It suggests a lack of clarity or precision.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Can you explain this concept to me?” a response might be, “It’s still unclear to me, but I can try.”
  • In a discussion about a confusing set of instructions, one might say, “The steps are unclear, I’m not sure what they’re asking us to do.”
  • A person describing a blurry photograph might say, “The image is unclear, you can’t make out the details.”

80. Unsure

This term is used to express a lack of certainty or confidence in something. It suggests a state of being unsure or hesitant.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to go out for dinner?” a response might be, “I’m unsure, I need to check my schedule.”
  • In a discussion about making a decision, one might say, “I’m still unsure about which option to choose.”
  • A person expressing hesitation about a plan might say, “I’m unsure if this is the right course of action, I need more information.”

81. Skeptical

When someone is skeptical, they have doubts or reservations about something. It implies a level of uncertainty or hesitation in accepting or believing in something.

  • For example, “I’m skeptical about his claims of having a million dollars.”
  • In a discussion about a new scientific discovery, someone might say, “I’m skeptical until I see more evidence.”
  • A person might express their skepticism by saying, “I find it hard to believe without further proof.”

82. Reluctant

Being reluctant means to have a certain level of unwillingness or hesitation towards doing something. It suggests a lack of enthusiasm or a preference to avoid a particular action.

  • For instance, “She was reluctant to join the party because she didn’t know anyone.”
  • In a conversation about trying new foods, someone might say, “I’m reluctant to eat sushi because I don’t like raw fish.”
  • A person might express their reluctance by saying, “I’d rather not go to the crowded concert.”

83. Questioning

Questioning refers to the act of having doubts or uncertainties about something. It suggests a critical examination or inquiry into the truth or validity of a statement or belief.

  • For example, “I’m questioning whether his story adds up.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I’m questioning the motives behind this decision.”
  • A person might express their questioning by saying, “I’m not sure if I can trust what they’re saying.”

84. With hesitation

When someone does something with hesitation, they do it with a certain level of reluctance or doubt. It implies a lack of confidence or certainty in their actions.

  • For instance, “She agreed to the plan, but with hesitation.”
  • In a conversation about taking risks, someone might say, “I approached the edge of the cliff with hesitation.”
  • A person might express their hesitation by saying, “I’m not sure if I can do it, but I’ll try.”