Top 71 Slang For Them – Meaning & Usage

“Them” is a term commonly used to refer to a group of people who are not easily categorized into traditional gender binaries. In this article, we’ll explore some of the most popular and widely used slangs that have emerged to describe and celebrate this diverse community. From “enby” to “genderqueer,” we’ve got you covered with the latest lingo that will help you navigate conversations and show your support for “them.” Get ready to expand your vocabulary and embrace inclusivity!

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1. Them

This term is used to refer to a group of people that is being talked about or referenced. It is a commonly used pronoun to indicate a collective group.

  • For example, “I saw them at the park earlier.”
  • In a conversation about a group of friends, one might say, “I’m going to meet up with them later.”
  • Another usage could be, “I don’t know much about them, but they seem nice.”

2. Those guys

This phrase is used to refer to a specific group of people, often in a casual or informal manner. It can be used to identify a group of individuals in a lighthearted or friendly way.

  • For instance, “I’m going to hang out with those guys from work.”
  • In a conversation about a group of friends, someone might say, “Those guys always know how to have a good time.”
  • Another usage could be, “I don’t really know those guys, but they seem cool.”

3. Those folks

This term is used to refer to a specific group of individuals, often in a friendly or respectful manner. It is a colloquial expression that can be used to describe a group of people in a positive or neutral way.

  • For example, “I had a great conversation with those folks at the event.”
  • In a discussion about a community, one might say, “Those folks are really involved in local initiatives.”
  • Another usage could be, “I don’t know much about those folks, but they seem friendly.”

4. Those individuals

This phrase is used to refer to a particular group of people, often in a formal or professional context. It is a more formal way to describe a group of individuals, typically used in a respectful or serious manner.

  • For instance, “We need to address the concerns of those individuals who were affected by the policy.”
  • In a discussion about a specific group, someone might say, “Those individuals have made significant contributions to the field.”
  • Another usage could be, “I don’t personally know those individuals, but I’ve heard good things about them.”

5. Those people

This term is used to refer to a specific group of people, often in a general or non-specific way. It is a commonly used phrase to describe a group of individuals without being too specific about their identity.

  • For example, “I saw those people at the concert last night.”
  • In a conversation about a group of strangers, one might say, “Those people over there look like they’re having a good time.”
  • Another usage could be, “I don’t know much about those people, but they seem friendly.”

6. Those peeps

This slang term is used to refer to a group of individuals or a specific set of people. It is a casual and familiar way to address a group.

  • For example, “Let’s meet up with those peeps at the party.”
  • A person might say, “I saw those peeps at the concert last night.”
  • Another might ask, “Who are those peeps over there?”

7. Those dudes

This slang term is used to refer to a group of males or a specific set of guys. It is a casual and informal way to address a group of male individuals.

  • For instance, “Let’s hang out with those dudes at the skatepark.”
  • A person might say, “I met those dudes at the gym.”
  • Another might ask, “Who are those dudes sitting at the bar?”

8. Those gals

This slang term is used to refer to a group of females or a specific set of ladies. It is a casual and informal way to address a group of female individuals.

  • For example, “Let’s have a girls’ night out with those gals.”
  • A person might say, “I went shopping with those gals.”
  • Another might ask, “Who are those gals in the photo?”

9. Those ladies

This slang term is used to refer to a group of females or a specific set of women. It is a casual and familiar way to address a group of female individuals.

  • For instance, “Let’s join those ladies for lunch.”
  • A person might say, “I had a great conversation with those ladies.”
  • Another might ask, “Who are those ladies at the event?”

10. Those gentlemen

This slang term is used to refer to a group of males or a specific set of gentlemen. It is a casual and familiar way to address a group of male individuals.

  • For example, “Let’s have a meeting with those gentlemen.”
  • A person might say, “I played golf with those gentlemen.”
  • Another might ask, “Who are those gentlemen in the suits?”

11. Those ladies and gentlemen

This phrase is a polite and formal way to refer to a group of people, particularly in a respectful or professional setting. It is used to address a mixed-gender group of individuals in a courteous manner.

  • For example, a speaker at an event might say, “Thank you, ladies and gentlemen, for joining us tonight.”
  • In a formal meeting, someone might address the attendees as, “Ladies and gentlemen, let’s begin our discussion.”
  • A host at a wedding might announce, “Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the newlyweds.”

12. Those folks over there

This phrase is a casual and inclusive way to refer to a group of individuals, often when they are within sight or nearby. It is a friendly and colloquial term used to address a group of people in a casual or informal setting.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Hey, check out those folks over there. They seem to be having a great time.”
  • When pointing out a group of friends, one might say, “I’m meeting up with those folks over there for dinner.”
  • In a crowded event, a person might ask, “Do you see those folks over there? That’s where we’re supposed to meet.”

13. Those individuals over there

This phrase is a formal and respectful way to refer to a group of individuals, particularly when emphasizing their distinctiveness or uniqueness. It is used to address a group of people in a more formal or professional setting.

  • For example, in a business setting, someone might say, “We need to collaborate with those individuals over there to complete the project.”
  • When pointing out a group of experts, one might say, “Those individuals over there are the leading authorities in their field.”
  • In a conference, a speaker might refer to a panel of experts as, “Those individuals over there have extensive knowledge in this area.”

14. Those people over there

This phrase is a general and inclusive way to refer to a group of individuals, particularly when they are within sight or nearby. It is a neutral term used to address a group of people without emphasizing any specific characteristics.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Let’s go talk to those people over there. They might have some interesting stories to share.”
  • When pointing out a group of strangers, one might say, “I don’t know those people over there, but they seem friendly.”
  • In a park, a parent might tell their child, “Be careful around those people over there and stay close to me.”

15. Those peeps over there

This phrase is an informal and affectionate way to refer to a group of individuals, often when they are within sight or nearby. It is a slang term used to address a group of people, particularly friends or acquaintances, in a casual or friendly manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “Let’s go hang out with those peeps over there. They’re always a fun group.”
  • When pointing out a group of friends, one might say, “I’m meeting up with those peeps over there for a movie night.”
  • At a party, a person might introduce their friends as, “These are my peeps over there. We go way back.”

16. Those dudes over there

This phrase is commonly used to refer to a group of men or boys who are located in a certain area. It is a casual and colloquial way of addressing a group of males.

  • For example, “Look at those dudes over there, they seem to be having a great time.”
  • A person might say, “I saw a group of dudes over there playing basketball.”
  • Another might comment, “I’m meeting up with some old college dudes over there for drinks tonight.”

17. Those gals over there

This expression is often used to refer to a group of women or girls who are situated in a specific place. It is a casual and informal way of addressing a group of females.

  • For instance, “Check out those gals over there, they’re dressed up for a night out.”
  • Someone might say, “I saw a bunch of gals over there having a picnic in the park.”
  • Another person might remark, “I’m meeting up with some old high school gals over there for lunch.”

18. Those ladies over there

This phrase is commonly used to refer to a group of mature women who are located in a particular area. It is a polite and respectful way of addressing a group of females.

  • For example, “Look at those ladies over there, they’re all dressed elegantly.”
  • A person might say, “I saw a group of ladies over there discussing art at the gallery.”
  • Another might comment, “I’m meeting up with some business ladies over there for a meeting.”

19. Those gentlemen over there

This expression is often used to refer to a group of mature men who are situated in a specific place. It is a polite and formal way of addressing a group of males.

  • For instance, “Check out those gentlemen over there, they’re all wearing suits.”
  • Someone might say, “I saw a bunch of gentlemen over there playing chess in the park.”
  • Another person might remark, “I’m meeting up with some business gentlemen over there for a conference.”

20. Those ladies and gentlemen over there

This phrase is commonly used to refer to a mixed group of individuals who are located in a certain area. It is a polite and inclusive way of addressing a group of people.

  • For example, “Look at those ladies and gentlemen over there, they’re all enjoying the party.”
  • A person might say, “I saw a group of ladies and gentlemen over there attending the charity event.”
  • Another might comment, “I’m meeting up with some colleagues, both ladies and gentlemen, over there for a networking event.”

21. Those guys in the corner

This phrase is used to refer to a group of men who are standing or sitting in a specific location. It is a casual way to describe a group of individuals without specifying their identities.

  • For example, someone might say, “Who are those guys in the corner?”
  • In a conversation about a party, one might ask, “Have you seen those guys in the corner? They seem interesting.”
  • Another person might comment, “I think those guys in the corner are part of a band.”

22. Those folks in the corner

This expression is used to refer to a group of individuals who are standing or sitting in a specific location. “Folks” is a more informal and friendly term for people.

  • For instance, someone might point and say, “Who are those folks in the corner?”
  • In a discussion about a gathering, one might mention, “I met some interesting folks in the corner.”
  • Another person might say, “I think those folks in the corner are part of the organizing team.”

23. Those individuals in the corner

This phrase is used to refer to a group of individuals who are standing or sitting in a specific location. “Individuals” is a more formal and neutral term for people.

  • For example, someone might observe, “Who are those individuals in the corner?”
  • In a conversation about a conference, one might ask, “Have you spoken to those individuals in the corner? They seem knowledgeable.”
  • Another person might comment, “I think those individuals in the corner are part of the panel.”

24. Those people in the corner

This expression is used to refer to a group of individuals who are standing or sitting in a specific location. It is a generic way to describe a group without specifying their identities.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Who are those people in the corner?”
  • In a discussion about a social event, one might mention, “I noticed those people in the corner. They seem interesting.”
  • Another person might comment, “I think those people in the corner are part of the organizing committee.”

25. Those ladies and gents

This phrase is used to refer to a mixed group of individuals, including both men and women. It is a polite and inclusive way to address a group of people.

  • For example, someone might say, “Let’s give a round of applause to those ladies and gents in the corner.”
  • In a conversation about a performance, one might comment, “I was impressed by the talent of those ladies and gents.”
  • Another person might say, “I think those ladies and gents in the corner are part of the entertainment team.”

26. Those ladies and gents over there

This phrase is used to refer to a group of people, usually in a respectful or formal manner. It is often used when pointing out a specific group of individuals.

  • For example, “Look at those ladies and gents over there, they’re dressed so elegantly.”
  • In a social gathering, someone might say, “Let’s welcome those ladies and gents over there to join us.”
  • When introducing a group of people, one might say, “These are those ladies and gents over there that I was telling you about.”

27. Those guys and gals

This phrase is a casual and gender-neutral way to refer to a group of people. It is often used in a friendly or informal context.

  • For instance, “Let’s hang out with those guys and gals at the party.”
  • When discussing a group of friends, one might say, “I love spending time with those guys and gals.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Do you know those guys and gals over there?”

28. Those individuals and folks

This phrase is a more formal and inclusive way to refer to a group of people. It is often used in professional or polite settings.

  • For example, “We need to address the concerns of those individuals and folks.”
  • When discussing a diverse group, one might say, “Let’s appreciate the contributions of those individuals and folks.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might ask, “What are the opinions of those individuals and folks on this matter?”

29. Those people and peeps

This phrase is a casual and friendly way to refer to a group of people. “Peeps” is a slang term for “people” and is often used in a lighthearted or familiar context.

  • For instance, “Let’s invite those people and peeps to our gathering.”
  • When talking about a group of friends, one might say, “I enjoy hanging out with those people and peeps.”
  • In a social setting, someone might ask, “Do you know those people and peeps over there?”

30. Those dudes and gals

This phrase is a casual and gender-neutral way to refer to a group of people. “Dudes” is a slang term for “men” and “gals” is a slang term for “women.” It is often used in a relaxed or informal context.

  • For example, “Let’s go hang out with those dudes and gals at the beach.”
  • When describing a group of friends, one might say, “I have the best time with those dudes and gals.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Have you met those dudes and gals before?”

31. Squad

This term refers to a close-knit group of friends or associates. It is often used to describe a group that spends a lot of time together and has each other’s backs.

  • For example, “I’m going out with my squad tonight.”
  • A person might say, “My squad always supports me no matter what.”
  • In a social media post, someone might write, “Love my squad, they’re the best!”

32. Crew

A crew refers to a group of people who work together or share a common purpose. It can be used to describe a team or a group of friends who are always together.

  • For instance, “I’m part of the film crew for this project.”
  • In a conversation about a band, someone might say, “The crew behind the scenes is just as important as the musicians.”
  • A person might introduce their friends by saying, “This is my crew, we’ve been friends since high school.”

33. Peeps

Peeps is a slang term used to refer to close friends or acquaintances. It’s a casual way of talking about the people you know and hang out with.

  • For example, “I’m meeting up with my peeps for lunch.”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “I’ll see if my peeps are available.”
  • A person might post a group photo with the caption, “Love my peeps, they’re the best!”

34. Homies

Homies is a term used to describe close friends who come from the same neighborhood or share a similar background. It’s often used in urban communities or among people who have a strong bond.

  • For instance, “I’m hanging out with my homies tonight.”
  • In a conversation about loyalty, someone might say, “My homies always have my back.”
  • A person might introduce their friends by saying, “These are my homies, we’ve known each other since we were kids.”

35. Bros

Bros is a slang term used to refer to close male friends. It’s a casual way of talking about your buddies or pals.

  • For example, “I’m going out with the bros tonight.”
  • In a conversation about support, someone might say, “My bros are always there for me.”
  • A person might post a group photo with the caption, “Love my bros, they’re the best!”

36. Gals

This term is a slang for referring to female friends or acquaintances. It is commonly used in informal settings or casual conversations.

  • For example, a group of friends might say, “Let’s have a girls’ night out, gals!”
  • In a friendly conversation, someone might say, “Hey gals, what are your plans for the weekend?”
  • A person might compliment their female friends by saying, “You gals are the best!”

37. Pals

This word is a casual term for referring to friends or companions. It is often used to describe people with whom one shares a close and friendly relationship.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m meeting up with my pals for lunch.”
  • In a conversation about hanging out, someone might suggest, “Let’s go to the movies, pals!”
  • A person might introduce their friends by saying, “These are my pals, we’ve known each other for years.”

38. Chums

This term is used to describe close friends or companions. It implies a sense of camaraderie and familiarity between individuals.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going on a road trip with my chums.”
  • In a discussion about friendship, someone might say, “True chums are always there for each other.”
  • A person might refer to their group of friends as “my chums” when talking about their social circle.
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39. Buds

This word is a slang term for buddies or close friends. It is often used to refer to a group of friends or individuals who share a bond or common interests.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m hanging out with my buds this weekend.”
  • In a conversation about going out, someone might suggest, “Let’s grab a drink, buds!”
  • A person might express their appreciation for their friends by saying, “I’m grateful for my buds, they always have my back.”

40. Amigos

This term is the Spanish word for friends. It is commonly used in English to refer to friends or companions, especially in a casual or friendly context.

  • For example, a person might say, “Let’s go grab some tacos, amigos!”
  • In a conversation about a group outing, someone might say, “I’m going to the beach with my amigos.”
  • A person might greet their friends by saying, “Hola amigos, how’s everyone doing?”

41. Mates

This term is commonly used in British slang to refer to friends or companions. It can also be used to address a group of people in a friendly manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “Hey mates, let’s go grab a pint at the pub.”
  • In a conversation about plans, one person might ask, “Are you bringing your mates to the party?”
  • A person might refer to their close friends as, “My mates are always there for me.”

42. Comrades

This term is often used to refer to fellow soldiers or members of a group who share a common cause or goal. It can also be used more broadly to describe close friends or allies.

  • For instance, in a military context, someone might say, “We fought alongside our comrades in the battle.”
  • In a political discussion, a person might refer to their fellow activists as, “Comrades in the fight for social justice.”
  • A person might use the term affectionately, saying, “I’m lucky to have such loyal comrades in my life.”

43. Allies

This term refers to individuals or groups who are united in a common purpose or goal. Allies often support and work together with each other.

  • For example, in a discussion about a team project, someone might say, “We need to collaborate with our allies to achieve success.”
  • In a political context, a person might refer to countries that support each other as, “Allies in the fight against terrorism.”
  • A person might use the term more broadly, saying, “I consider my close friends to be my allies in life.”

44. Sidekicks

This term is often used to refer to a close companion or partner, especially in adventurous or heroic contexts. Sidekicks are typically loyal and supportive of the main character or protagonist.

  • For instance, in superhero stories, the main character might have a sidekick who helps them fight crime.
  • In a conversation about teamwork, someone might say, “We make a great team – like Batman and Robin, or like sidekicks.”
  • A person might jokingly refer to their best friend as their sidekick, saying, “We’re always getting into mischief together. We’re like sidekicks.”

45. Acquaintances

This term refers to people who are known to someone, but with whom they have a limited or casual relationship. Acquaintances are not as close as friends, but are still familiar to each other.

  • For example, in a discussion about social circles, someone might say, “I have many acquaintances, but only a few close friends.”
  • In a networking context, a person might refer to professional contacts as, “Acquaintances in the industry.”
  • A person might use the term to describe casual connections, saying, “I have many acquaintances from my college days.”

46. Associates

This term refers to people who are connected or involved in a particular activity or profession. It can be used to describe colleagues or business contacts.

  • For example, “He introduced me to his associates at the networking event.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “I work closely with my associates to achieve our goals.”
  • A person discussing their social circle might mention, “I have a few close associates who I can always rely on.”

47. Colleagues

Colleagues are individuals who work together in the same profession or organization. The term is commonly used to refer to people who share a workplace or professional relationship.

  • For instance, “I have a meeting with my colleagues to discuss the project.”
  • In a conversation about work, someone might say, “My colleagues and I are collaborating on a new initiative.”
  • A person discussing their job might mention, “I enjoy working with my colleagues because we have a great team dynamic.”

48. Partners

Partners are individuals who work together towards a common goal or share responsibility for a project or task. The term can refer to business partners, romantic partners, or individuals who collaborate in any context.

  • For example, “We are partners in this business venture.”
  • In a sports context, someone might say, “My partner and I work well together on the field.”
  • A person discussing a group project might mention, “I have two partners who are helping me complete this assignment.”

49. Cohorts

Cohorts are a group of people who share a common experience or are part of a specific group or organization. The term can be used to describe classmates, colleagues, or individuals who have gone through a similar experience.

  • For instance, “My cohorts and I graduated from the same program.”
  • In a military context, someone might say, “I served alongside my cohorts during my time in the army.”
  • A person discussing their college experience might mention, “I have a close group of cohorts from my time at university.”

50. Cronies

Cronies are close friends or companions who are often seen together or involved in the same activities. The term is commonly used to describe individuals who are loyal to each other and frequently engage in social or leisure activities together.

  • For example, “He always hangs out with his cronies at the local bar.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “I’ve known my cronies since childhood.”
  • A person discussing their social circle might mention, “I have a tight-knit group of cronies who are like family to me.”

51. Fellas

This term is a casual and friendly way to refer to a group of male friends or acquaintances. It is often used to address or refer to a group of men in a casual or informal setting.

  • For example, “Hey fellas, what’s the plan for tonight?”
  • A person might say, “I’m meeting up with the fellas for a game of basketball.”
  • In a conversation about hanging out with friends, someone might mention, “I always have a great time when I’m with the fellas.”

52. Ladies

This slang term is used to address or refer to a group of female friends or acquaintances in a casual or friendly manner. It is commonly used to create a sense of camaraderie among women.

  • For instance, “Hey ladies, are you ready for a night out?”
  • A person might say, “I’m having a girls’ night in with the ladies.”
  • In a discussion about female empowerment, someone might say, “Ladies, let’s support and uplift each other.”

53. BFFs

This acronym stands for “Best Friends Forever” and is used to refer to extremely close friends. It is often used to describe a friendship that is strong, enduring, and based on mutual trust and support.

  • For example, “I’m going on a road trip with my BFFs.”
  • A person might post a picture with their friends on social media with the caption, “Forever grateful for my BFFs.”
  • In a conversation about friendships, someone might say, “Having a few true BFFs is better than having many casual friends.”

54. Besties

This term is a colloquial and affectionate way to refer to one’s closest friends. It is often used to describe friends who share a deep bond, trust, and understanding.

  • For instance, “I’m going shopping with my besties this weekend.”
  • A person might introduce their friends by saying, “These are my besties, we’ve known each other since childhood.”
  • In a discussion about friendship, someone might say, “Having a group of supportive besties makes life more enjoyable.”

55. Those ones

This phrase is used to refer to a group of people in a casual or informal manner. It is often used when the speaker is trying to distinguish or identify a particular group of individuals.

  • For example, “Did you see those ones at the party? They were causing a scene.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t like hanging out with those ones, they’re always gossiping.”
  • In a conversation about a specific group of friends, someone might mention, “I’m going out with those ones from work tonight.”

56. Those guys over there

This phrase is used to refer to a group of individuals who are located at a distance from the speaker. It is a casual way of pointing out a group of people without specifying their gender.

  • For example, “Hey, check out those guys over there. They’re having a great time.”
  • In a conversation about a crowded event, someone might say, “I can’t see what’s happening, but those guys over there seem excited.”
  • Another person might ask, “Do you know those guys over there? They look familiar.”

57. Those ones over there

Similar to the previous phrase, this is another way to refer to a group of individuals who are located at a distance from the speaker. It is a casual way of pointing out a group of people without specifying their gender.

  • For instance, “Look at those ones over there. They seem to be having a good time.”
  • In a discussion about a crowded venue, someone might say, “I’m trying to find my friends. Have you seen those ones over there?”
  • Another person might comment, “Those ones over there are really loud.”

58. Those ones in the corner

This phrase is used to refer to a group of individuals who are specifically located in a corner. It is a casual way of pointing out a group of people without specifying their gender.

  • For example, “Let’s go talk to those ones in the corner. They seem interesting.”
  • In a conversation about a party, someone might say, “I noticed those ones in the corner. They’re having a great time.”
  • Another person might ask, “Who are those ones in the corner? I haven’t seen them before.”

59. Those peeps in the corner

This phrase is a slang term used to refer to a group of individuals who are specifically located in a corner. “Peeps” is a casual way of saying “people”.

  • For instance, “I see those peeps in the corner. Let’s go say hi.”
  • In a discussion about a social gathering, someone might say, “I don’t know those peeps in the corner. Are they friends of yours?”
  • Another person might comment, “Those peeps in the corner look like they’re having a good time.”

60. Those individuals at the party

This phrase is a more formal way of referring to a group of individuals who are present at a party. It is a way of specifying the people without using casual slang terms.

  • For example, “I don’t recognize those individuals at the party. Are they new here?”
  • In a conversation about a social event, someone might say, “I’m enjoying meeting all the different individuals at the party.”
  • Another person might ask, “Have you talked to those individuals at the party? They seem interesting.”

61. Those folks at the party

This phrase is used to refer to a group of people at a party or gathering. It is a casual and inclusive way to talk about a specific group of individuals.

  • For example, “Did you see those folks at the party? They were having a great time!”
  • Someone might say, “I met some interesting folks at the party last night.”
  • Another person might comment, “Those folks really know how to have a good time!”

62. Those guys at the party

This expression is used to talk about a group of male individuals at a party or gathering. It is a casual and colloquial way to refer to a specific group of guys.

  • For instance, “Those guys at the party were hilarious! They had everyone laughing.”
  • Someone might say, “I had a great conversation with those guys at the party.”
  • Another person might comment, “Those guys really know how to throw a party!”

63. Those people at the party

This phrase is used to talk about a group of people at a party or gathering. It is a general and inclusive way to refer to a specific group of individuals.

  • For example, “I didn’t know most of those people at the party, but they were all friendly.”
  • Someone might say, “Those people at the party were really talented. I was impressed with their skills.”
  • Another person might comment, “I had a great time getting to know those people at the party.”

64. Those ones at the party

This expression is used to talk about a specific group of individuals at a party or gathering. It is a casual and informal way to refer to a particular group.

  • For instance, “Those ones at the party were dancing all night long.”
  • Someone might say, “I didn’t know most of those ones at the party, but they seemed nice.”
  • Another person might comment, “Those ones at the party really knew how to have a good time!”

65. Those peeps at the party

This slang term is used to refer to a specific group of individuals at a party or gathering. It is a casual and familiar way to talk about a particular group.

  • For example, “I had a great time hanging out with those peeps at the party.”
  • Someone might say, “Those peeps at the party were so friendly and welcoming.”
  • Another person might comment, “I didn’t know most of those peeps at the party, but they made me feel included.”

66. Those individuals in the crowd

This phrase is used to refer to a group of people who are standing or sitting together in a specific location, typically in a public setting. It is a way to identify a particular group of people without using their specific names or titles.

  • For example, “Those individuals in the crowd seem really excited about the concert.”
  • In a political rally, someone might say, “I can’t believe the passion of those people in the crowd.”
  • A person observing a protest might comment, “Those individuals in the crowd are really making their voices heard.”

67. Those folks in the crowd

Similar to the previous phrase, this expression is used to refer to a group of people in a crowd. “Folks” is a colloquial term that is often used to address or describe a group of individuals in a casual or friendly manner.

  • For instance, “Those folks in the crowd are really enjoying the music.”
  • At a community event, someone might say, “I’m glad to see so many folks in the crowd supporting local businesses.”
  • A person attending a festival might comment, “Those folks in the crowd are having a great time.”

68. Those guys in the crowd

This phrase is used to refer to a group of males in a crowd. “Guys” is a colloquial term that is commonly used to address or describe a group of men or boys in an informal or friendly manner.

  • For example, “Those guys in the crowd are really enthusiastic about the game.”
  • At a concert, someone might say, “I love seeing all the guys in the crowd singing along.”
  • A person attending a sports event might comment, “Those guys in the crowd are really passionate about their team.”

69. Those people in the crowd

This phrase is a more general way to refer to a group of people in a crowd. It is a neutral term that can be used to describe any gender or age group.

  • For instance, “Those people in the crowd are really excited about the parade.”
  • At a festival, someone might say, “I can’t believe the number of people in the crowd.”
  • A person attending a demonstration might comment, “Those people in the crowd are really passionate about their cause.”

70. Those ones in the crowd

This phrase is used to refer to specific individuals in a crowd. It emphasizes the presence and identity of certain people within a larger group.

  • For example, “Those ones in the crowd with the colorful hats are really standing out.”
  • At a concert, someone might say, “I love the energy of those ones in the crowd dancing and singing along.”
  • A person attending a rally might comment, “Those ones in the crowd holding signs are really making a statement.”

71. Those peeps in the crowd

This phrase refers to the individuals who are present in a crowd or audience.

  • For example, during a concert, a performer might say, “I want to thank all the peeps in the crowd for coming out tonight.”
  • In a sports event, a commentator might mention, “The peeps in the crowd are really showing their support for the team.”
  • Someone describing a protest might say, “The peeps in the crowd were chanting slogans and holding signs.”