Top 63 Slang For Thief – Meaning & Usage

Thieves, the elusive and cunning individuals who make a living out of taking what’s not theirs. But what do we call them in the world of slang? In this listicle, we’ve gathered the top slang terms for thieves that you need to know. From pickpockets to con artists, get ready to delve into the underground lingo and expand your knowledge of the world of thieves!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Blag

To “blag” means to carry out a robbery or steal something. It is often used to describe a successful or audacious theft.

  • For example, “He managed to blag his way into the bank vault and steal all the money.”
  • In a news report about a heist, you might read, “The thieves blagged a priceless diamond necklace from the museum.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “Watch out, he’ll blag your snacks if you’re not careful.”

2. Bleed Dry

To “bleed someone dry” means to take all their money or resources, often through dishonest or illegal means.

  • For instance, “The con artist bled the old man dry by convincing him to invest in a fake business.”
  • In a conversation about financial scams, someone might say, “These scammers are experts at bleeding their victims dry.”
  • A person might warn others by saying, “Don’t lend him money, he’ll just bleed you dry.”

3. Bogart

To “bogart” means to selfishly or unfairly keep something for oneself, often by stealing or hoarding it.

  • For example, “He bogarted all the snacks at the party and didn’t share with anyone.”
  • In a discussion about resource distribution, someone might say, “Don’t bogart all the good stuff, leave some for the rest of us.”
  • A friend might playfully accuse another by saying, “Stop bogarting the remote control, it’s my turn to choose.”

4. Boost

To “boost” means to steal or shoplift something, typically in a quick and surreptitious manner.

  • For instance, “He managed to boost a wallet from the crowded market without anyone noticing.”
  • In a conversation about crime, someone might say, “Shoplifters often target small items that are easy to boost.”
  • A person might warn others by saying, “Keep an eye on your belongings, thieves are known to boost things in crowded places.”

5. Borrowing Without Permission

“Borrowing without permission” refers to the act of taking something without asking for permission, often with the intention of returning it later.

  • For example, “He borrowed my phone without asking and returned it hours later.”
  • In a discussion about personal boundaries, someone might say, “It’s not okay to borrow without permission, always ask first.”
  • A friend might confront another by saying, “You can’t just borrow my clothes without asking, that’s not cool.”

6. Carp

This term refers to a thief who specializes in stealing from people’s pockets, usually in crowded areas. “Carp” is a slang term used to describe a pickpocket.

  • For example, “Watch out for that carp in the subway, they’re known for targeting tourists.”
  • A victim of a pickpocket might say, “I didn’t realize I had been carp’d until my wallet was gone.”
  • In a discussion about street crime, someone might mention, “Pickpockets are skilled at their craft, it takes a trained eye to spot a carp.”

7. Chav

This term originated in the UK and refers to a young person, often from a lower socioeconomic background, who engages in antisocial behavior, including theft. “Chav” can be used to describe someone who is involved in petty theft.

  • For instance, “The chavs in the neighborhood have been stealing bikes.”
  • A victim of theft might say, “I caught a chav trying to steal my phone.”
  • In a discussion about crime, someone might comment, “Chavs often target cars for theft due to their quick resale value.”

8. Clean Out

To “clean out” means to completely empty a place or object, often in the context of theft. It can refer to stealing everything of value or taking all the available resources.

  • For example, “The burglars cleaned out the entire house while the owners were on vacation.”
  • A victim of a robbery might say, “They cleaned out my jewelry box, nothing was left.”
  • In a discussion about a heist movie, someone might comment, “The thieves managed to clean out the museum without leaving a trace.”

9. Cozen

To “cozen” means to deceive or trick someone, often for personal gain. It can refer to a thief who uses cunning and deceitful tactics to steal from others.

  • For instance, “He cozened his way into the victim’s trust before stealing their money.”
  • A victim of a scam might say, “I was cozened into giving away my personal information.”
  • In a discussion about con artists, someone might comment, “Cozening requires a high level of manipulation and persuasion skills.”

10. Debo

To “debo” means to rob or steal something forcefully, often using intimidation or aggression. It can refer to a thief who takes something by force or threat.

  • For example, “The gang deboed the rival gang’s territory and took control.”
  • A victim of a mugging might say, “They deboed my wallet and ran off.”
  • In a discussion about crime rates, someone might mention, “Deboing is a common method used by street gangs to establish dominance.”

11. Horch

This term refers to eavesdropping or listening in on someone’s conversation or private information. It can also be used in the context of stealing information or secrets by covertly listening.

  • For example, “The spy horched in on the enemy’s conversation to gather intelligence.”
  • In a crime novel, a detective might say, “I think someone horched in on our conversation and found out our plans.”
  • A hacker might use the term to describe stealing sensitive data by intercepting communication, saying, “I was able to horch into their network and steal their passwords.”

12. Knocked Off

This term is used to describe something that has been stolen or taken without permission. It can also refer to the act of stealing or committing a theft.

  • For instance, “My car was knocked off last night from the parking lot.”
  • In a police report, an officer might write, “The suspect knocked off several valuable items from the store.”
  • A victim of theft might say, “I can’t believe someone knocked off my wallet while I wasn’t looking.”

13. Lift

To “lift” means to steal or take something without permission. It is often used to describe stealing small items or pickpocketing.

  • For example, “The thief lifted the wallet from the unsuspecting victim’s pocket.”
  • In a crime movie, a character might say, “I can lift that diamond necklace without anyone noticing.”
  • A shop owner might warn customers, “Be careful with your belongings, as there are pickpockets around who can lift your valuables.”

14. Loot

This term refers to stolen goods or valuables obtained through theft or looting. It can also be used as a verb to describe the act of stealing or plundering.

  • For instance, “The burglars escaped with a bag full of loot from the house.”
  • In a video game, a character might say, “Let’s go loot the treasure chest for valuable items.”
  • A police officer might report, “We recovered a significant amount of loot from the suspect’s hideout.”

15. Misappropriate

To misappropriate means to steal or use something dishonestly or improperly, typically for personal gain. It is often used in the context of misusing funds or resources.

  • For example, “The accountant was found guilty of misappropriating company funds.”
  • In a corporate setting, an employee might say, “Some executives misappropriate company resources for personal use.”
  • A news article might report, “The politician was accused of misappropriating public funds for personal expenses.”

16. Mugger

A mugger is a person who commits robbery or theft, typically in a public place and often using force or threats. It refers to someone who targets individuals to steal their belongings.

  • For example, “I was walking home when a mugger jumped out from behind a bush.”
  • In a news report, you might read, “Local authorities are warning residents about a series of muggings in the area.”
  • A victim might describe their experience by saying, “The mugger grabbed my purse and ran off before I could react.”

17. Nick

To “nick” something means to steal or take without permission. It is a slang term commonly used to refer to the act of theft.

  • For instance, “Someone nicked my bike while I was at the store.”
  • In a conversation about missing items, one might say, “I think someone nicked my wallet from my backpack.”
  • A witness might report, “I saw a guy trying to nick a laptop from the coffee shop.”

18. Palm

To “palm” something means to steal or take without being noticed. It refers to the act of concealing an item in the palm of one’s hand while stealing it.

  • For example, “The pickpocket expertly palmed the victim’s watch.”
  • In a discussion about pickpocketing techniques, one might mention, “They can palm your phone without you even realizing it.”
  • A security guard might warn, “Watch out for people trying to palm small items from the store.”

19. Pinch

To “pinch” something means to steal or take without permission. It is a slang term often used to describe the act of theft, especially in a casual or lighthearted manner.

  • For instance, “I pinched a few candies from the jar when no one was looking.”
  • In a conversation about shoplifting, one might say, “She got caught pinching makeup from the store.”
  • A friend might jokingly accuse another by saying, “You’re always pinching my snacks!”

20. Pocket

To “pocket” something means to steal or take without permission. It refers to the act of surreptitiously taking an item and concealing it in one’s pocket.

  • For example, “He pocketed the jewelry while pretending to browse.”
  • In a discussion about pickpocketing techniques, one might explain, “They can quickly pocket your wallet without you even feeling it.”
  • A victim might recount their experience by saying, “I realized my phone was gone after someone pocketed it in the crowded train.”

21. Prig

To take something without permission or unlawfully. “Prig” is a slang term used to describe a person who steals, often in a sneaky or underhanded manner.

  • For example, “He prigged a wallet from the unsuspecting tourist.”
  • In a discussion about shoplifting, someone might say, “She’s known to be a prig, always taking things from stores.”
  • A person warning others about theft might say, “Watch out for prigs at crowded events.”

22. Punk

A derogatory slang term for a thief or criminal. “Punk” is often used to describe someone who engages in petty theft or other illegal activities.

  • For instance, “The punk stole my phone when I wasn’t looking.”
  • In a conversation about crime, someone might say, “The neighborhood has a problem with punks breaking into cars.”
  • A person warning others about theft might say, “Don’t leave your belongings unattended, or some punk might snatch them.”

23. Rip Off

To deceive or cheat someone by taking their money or belongings. “Rip off” is a slang term used to describe an act of theft or a scam.

  • For example, “He ripped off the tourists by selling fake tickets.”
  • In a discussion about dishonest business practices, someone might say, “That company is known for ripping off its customers.”
  • A person warning others about scams might say, “Be careful not to fall for any rip-offs while traveling.”

24. Smash And Grab

A method of theft in which the thief breaks into a place, quickly takes what they want, and then leaves. “Smash and grab” is often used to describe a fast and opportunistic theft.

  • For instance, “The thief smashed the store window and made a grab for the jewelry.”
  • In a conversation about car break-ins, someone might say, “They did a smash and grab on my parked car, taking my bag.”
  • A person warning others about theft might say, “Be cautious of leaving valuable items in your car, as it could be a target for smash and grab thefts.”

25. Snake

To deceive or cheat someone. “Snake” is a slang term used to describe a person who is cunning, deceitful, or untrustworthy, often involved in stealing or scamming.

  • For example, “He snaked his way into their trust and stole their money.”
  • In a discussion about con artists, someone might say, “Watch out for that snake, he’s known for tricking people out of their savings.”
  • A person warning others about deception might say, “Don’t trust that snake, he’ll try to steal from you given the chance.”

26. Snitch

A “snitch” is someone who provides information to authorities or other individuals, often in exchange for some benefit or to avoid punishment themselves. The term is often used in a negative context, implying betrayal or disloyalty.

  • For example, in a crime movie, a character might say, “Don’t trust him, he’s a snitch.”
  • In a discussion about police investigations, someone might say, “Sometimes, a case can only be solved with the help of a snitch.”
  • A person might warn their friends, “Be careful who you confide in, you never know who might be a snitch.”

27. Swipe

To “swipe” something means to steal or take it without permission. The term is often used to describe quick and stealthy thefts.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Someone swiped my wallet while I wasn’t looking.”
  • In a conversation about shoplifting, someone might mention, “Some people have become experts at swiping items from stores.”
  • A news article might report, “Thieves swiped over $10,000 worth of jewelry from a local store.”

28. Take Off

To “take off” means to steal or rob a place, typically a home or building. The term implies a swift and discreet theft, often when the owner is not present.

  • For example, a person might say, “Someone took off with all my valuables while I was on vacation.”
  • In a discussion about home security, someone might mention, “I installed a security system to prevent anyone from taking off with my belongings.”
  • A news headline might read, “Burglars take off with priceless artwork from a museum.”

29. Trouser

To “trouser” something means to steal or secretly take it, often by hiding it in one’s pockets. The term is derived from the action of concealing stolen items in one’s trousers or pants.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He trousered the valuable necklace without anyone noticing.”
  • In a conversation about pickpocketing, a person might mention, “They can quickly trouser your wallet without you feeling a thing.”
  • A news report might state, “A skilled thief managed to trouser several expensive watches from a high-end store.”

30. Twoc

“Twoc” is a slang term that stands for “Taken Without Owner’s Consent.” It refers to the act of stealing a car without the owner’s permission or knowledge.

  • For example, a person might say, “My car got twoc’d last night from right outside my house.”
  • In a discussion about car theft, someone might mention, “Certain models are more likely to be twoc’d due to their popularity among thieves.”
  • A news article might report, “Police apprehended a suspect who was attempting to twoc a vehicle in broad daylight.”

31. Whiz

A “whiz” is a slang term for a pickpocket, someone who steals items from people’s pockets or bags without them noticing.

  • For example, “Watch out for that guy, he’s a whiz and can steal your wallet without you even realizing it.”
  • In a crime novel, a detective might say, “The whiz we’re looking for is known for targeting crowded areas.”
  • A victim of pickpocketing might say, “I can’t believe I fell victim to a whiz on the subway.”

32. Whiz Mob

A “whiz mob” refers to a group of pickpockets working together to steal from unsuspecting victims.

  • For instance, “The city has been plagued by a whiz mob that targets tourists in crowded areas.”
  • In a crime movie, a character might say, “The whiz mob operates with precision and coordination.”
  • A police officer investigating a series of pickpocketing incidents might say, “We believe the whiz mob is responsible for these thefts.”

33. Swiper

A “swiper” is a slang term for a thief who takes things without permission.

  • For example, “Be careful with your belongings, there’s a swiper in this area.”
  • In a conversation about personal security, someone might say, “Always keep an eye on your belongings to prevent swipers from stealing them.”
  • A victim of theft might say, “I was targeted by a swiper who took my phone right out of my hand.”

34. Bandit

A “bandit” is a slang term for a thief or outlaw who engages in illegal activities, often with a sense of adventure or rebellion.

  • For instance, “The bandit rode into town and robbed the bank, leaving the townspeople in shock.”
  • In a discussion about famous outlaws, someone might mention, “Jesse James was one of the most notorious bandits in American history.”
  • A person describing a daring theft might say, “The bandit pulled off a heist that seemed impossible.”

35. Sticky fingers

“Sticky fingers” is a slang term used to describe someone who has a tendency to steal or take things that don’t belong to them.

  • For example, “Be careful with your valuables around him, he has sticky fingers.”
  • In a conversation about shoplifting, someone might say, “Shop owners need to be vigilant in preventing sticky fingers from stealing merchandise.”
  • A parent discussing their child’s behavior might say, “I caught my son with sticky fingers, taking candy from the store without paying.”

36. Light-fingered

This term refers to someone who is skilled at stealing things without being detected. “Light-fingered” suggests that the thief has nimble fingers that can quickly snatch items.

  • For example, a detective might describe a suspect as “light-fingered” based on their ability to steal without leaving a trace.
  • In a conversation about pickpocketing, someone might say, “Pickpockets are often light-fingered individuals who can steal your wallet without you even noticing.”
  • A news article might report, “The light-fingered thief managed to steal a valuable painting from a heavily guarded museum.”

37. Filcher

This term refers to someone who steals things in a sneaky or underhanded way. A filcher is often associated with stealing small or inconspicuous items.

  • For instance, in a book or movie, a character might be described as a “filcher” if they are known for stealing small treasures or trinkets.
  • In a conversation about shoplifting, someone might say, “Shoplifters are often skilled filchers who can easily slip items into their pockets.”
  • A news headline might read, “Filcher caught stealing from multiple stores in the city.”

38. Pickpocket

A pickpocket is a thief who specializes in stealing items from people’s pockets or bags without their knowledge or consent. They are skilled at discreetly removing valuables without being detected.

  • For example, a tourist might become a victim of a pickpocket in a crowded market.
  • In a discussion about personal safety, someone might warn, “Be careful of pickpockets in crowded areas, especially when traveling.”
  • A news report might state, “The local police have arrested several pickpockets operating in the city center.”

39. Cat burglar

A cat burglar is a thief who specializes in breaking into homes or buildings and stealing valuable items without being detected. The term “cat” is used to describe their stealthy and nimble movements.

  • For instance, in a heist movie, the main character might be a skilled cat burglar.
  • In a conversation about home security, someone might say, “Cat burglars often target houses with minimal security measures.”
  • A news headline might read, “Cat burglar strikes again, stealing priceless artifacts from a wealthy estate.”

40. Pilferer

A pilferer is a thief who steals small or insignificant items, often in a casual or opportunistic manner. They typically target low-value items that may go unnoticed or be easily replaced.

  • For example, someone might be described as a pilferer if they frequently take small office supplies from their workplace.
  • In a conversation about shoplifting, someone might mention, “Shoplifters are often pilferers who steal small items for personal use or resale.”
  • A news report might state, “The local grocery store has experienced a rise in pilferers stealing snacks and small household items.”

41. Klepto

This term is used to describe someone who has a compulsive urge to steal, often without any need or financial motive. A kleptomaniac may steal items that are of little value or even unnecessary for their own use.

  • For example, “She couldn’t resist the urge to steal random items from the store. She’s a klepto.”
  • In a discussion about unusual disorders, someone might mention, “Kleptomania is a rare condition characterized by the irresistible urge to steal.”
  • A person might jokingly say, “Watch out for your belongings around me, I might turn into a klepto!”

42. Snatcher

This term refers to someone who steals from the pockets or bags of unsuspecting victims, often in crowded places. Pickpockets are skilled at removing items without the victim’s knowledge.

  • For instance, “Beware of pickpockets in crowded tourist areas.”
  • In a crime novel, a detective might say, “The suspect operates as a snatcher in crowded train stations.”
  • A traveler might warn others, “Keep your wallet secure to avoid becoming a victim of a snatcher.”

43. Larcenist

This is a general term used to describe someone who steals or commits larceny. A larcenist may steal anything from small items to large valuables.

  • For example, “The larcenist broke into the house and stole valuable jewelry.”
  • In a news report, a journalist might report, “The police arrested a notorious larcenist who had been targeting high-end stores.”
  • A person discussing crime rates might mention, “Larcenists often target unlocked cars to steal valuables.”

44. Crook

This term is used to describe someone involved in criminal activities, including theft. A crook may specialize in various types of theft, such as burglary, robbery, or pickpocketing.

  • For instance, “The police apprehended a gang of crooks responsible for a series of bank robberies.”
  • In a crime movie, a character might say, “I used to be a crook, but I’ve turned my life around.”
  • A person discussing crime prevention might say, “We need to find ways to rehabilitate crooks and reduce recidivism.”

45. Shoplifter

This term specifically refers to someone who steals items from retail stores without paying for them. Shoplifters may use various techniques to hide or remove items from the store without being detected.

  • For example, “The store installed surveillance cameras to catch shoplifters in the act.”
  • In a discussion about loss prevention, a retail manager might say, “Shoplifters cost businesses millions of dollars each year.”
  • A person might warn others, “Be careful when leaving your bags unattended in a store to prevent shoplifters from taking advantage.”

46. Grifter

A grifter is a person who engages in fraudulent schemes or cons to deceive and swindle others for personal gain. The term is often used to describe someone who is skilled at manipulating people for financial or personal advantage.

  • For example, “The grifter convinced the elderly couple to invest their life savings in a nonexistent business.”
  • In a discussion about scams, one might say, “Watch out for grifters who try to sell you fake products.”
  • A person might warn others, “Don’t fall for the grifter’s smooth-talking tricks.”

47. Rustler

A rustler is a person who steals livestock, particularly cattle. The term is commonly used in the context of the American Old West, where cattle rustling was a prevalent crime. Rustlers often steal cattle to sell them for profit or to use them for personal consumption.

  • For instance, “The rancher caught the rustler red-handed while attempting to steal his herd.”
  • In a discussion about historical crimes, one might mention, “Cattle rustlers were a constant threat to ranchers in the Wild West.”
  • A person might use the term metaphorically, saying, “He’s a rustler of ideas, always stealing other people’s work.”

48. Highwayman

A highwayman is a thief who robs travelers, particularly those on highways or remote roads. The term originated in the 17th and 18th centuries and is often associated with romanticized stories of daring and adventure. Highwaymen would ambush their victims, demanding their valuables or money.

  • For example, “The highwayman held up the carriage and demanded the passengers’ wallets and jewelry.”
  • In a discussion about historical crime, one might say, “Highwaymen were a constant threat to travelers in the past.”
  • A person might use the term metaphorically, saying, “He’s a highwayman of ideas, always stealing other people’s concepts.”

49. Catfish

In the context of online interactions, a catfish is a person who creates a fake identity or persona to deceive others. Catfish often use stolen photos or invent elaborate stories to manipulate their victims emotionally or financially. The term originated from a documentary and subsequent TV series that explored deceptive online relationships.

  • For instance, “She realized the person she had been talking to online was a catfish when she found the same profile picture on another website.”
  • In a discussion about online dating, one might say, “Be cautious of catfish who pretend to be someone they’re not.”
  • A person might share their experience, saying, “I was catfished by someone pretending to be a famous celebrity.”

50. Fence

A fence is a person who buys and sells stolen goods, often acting as a middleman between thieves and potential buyers. Fences provide a way for thieves to profit from their stolen items by selling them discreetly. The term can also be used as a verb to describe the act of selling stolen goods.

  • For example, “The thief brought the stolen jewelry to a fence who would sell it on the black market.”
  • In a discussion about crime, one might say, “Fences play a crucial role in the illegal economy by facilitating the sale of stolen goods.”
  • A person might use the term metaphorically, saying, “He’s a fence for stolen ideas, always profiting from other people’s work.”

51. Yardbird

“Yardbird” is a slang term for a thief that is often used in the context of a prisoner or someone who has been caught and incarcerated for their criminal activities.

  • For example, a police officer might refer to a convicted thief as a “yardbird.”
  • In a conversation about prison life, someone might mention, “Yardbirds often form alliances to protect themselves inside.”
  • A news article might discuss the rehabilitation of yardbirds and their reintegration into society.
See also  Top 50 Slang For Sorrow – Meaning & Usage

52. Footpad

A “footpad” is a term used to describe a thief who specializes in stealing from people by discreetly removing items from their pockets or bags, typically in crowded public places.

  • For instance, a tourist might fall victim to a footpad while exploring a busy market.
  • In a cautionary article about travel safety, a writer might warn readers about the prevalence of footpads in certain areas.
  • A detective investigating a series of pickpocketing incidents might refer to the culprit as a “footpad.”

53. Snaffler

A “snaffler” is a slang term for a thief or someone who steals things, often in a sly or sneaky manner.

  • For example, a witness to a theft might describe the perpetrator as a snaffler.
  • In a conversation about shoplifting, someone might mention, “Snafflers often target high-value items.”
  • A writer discussing the psychology of theft might explore the motivations of snafflers.

54. Thief

“Thief” is a straightforward term for someone who steals things without permission or unlawfully takes someone else’s property.

  • For instance, a witness to a robbery might identify the perpetrator as a thief.
  • In a discussion about crime rates, someone might mention, “Bicycle theft is a common crime committed by thieves.”
  • A news article might report on the arrest and prosecution of a notorious thief.

55. Burglar

A “burglar” is a term used to describe a thief who breaks into houses or other buildings to steal valuable items.

  • For example, a homeowner might discover evidence of a burglar, such as a broken window or missing items.
  • In a discussion about home security, someone might mention, “Alarms and surveillance cameras can deter burglars.”
  • A detective investigating a series of break-ins might refer to the suspect as a “burglar.”

56. Robber

A robber is someone who steals from others by using force, intimidation, or the threat of violence. They typically target individuals or establishments with the intention of taking their belongings or money.

  • For example, a news headline might read, “Masked robber holds up local convenience store.”
  • In a crime novel, a character might say, “The robber brandished a knife and demanded the cashier hand over all the cash.”
  • In a discussion about crime prevention, someone might mention, “It’s important to be aware of your surroundings to avoid becoming a victim of a robber.”

57. Swindler

A swindler is someone who uses deception and cunning tactics to cheat or defraud others out of their money or belongings. They often manipulate or exploit the trust of their victims for personal gain.

  • For instance, a scam artist who convinces people to invest in a fake business opportunity would be considered a swindler.
  • In a conversation about financial scams, someone might warn, “Watch out for swindlers promising unrealistic returns on investments.”
  • In a movie about con artists, a character might say, “The swindler tricked his victims into giving him their life savings.”

58. Con artist

A con artist is someone who gains the trust and confidence of others in order to deceive and exploit them for personal gain. They often use charm, persuasion, and manipulation to convince their victims to give them money or valuable items.

  • For example, a con artist might pose as a wealthy investor and convince others to invest in a fraudulent scheme.
  • In a discussion about online scams, someone might say, “Be careful not to fall for the tricks of a con artist posing as a romantic partner.”
  • In a TV show about con artists, a character might say, “The con artist used his smooth talking skills to swindle his victims out of thousands of dollars.”

59. Looter

A looter is someone who takes advantage of a riot or civil disturbance to steal or vandalize property. They often target businesses or homes that have been left unattended or are vulnerable due to the chaos.

  • For instance, during a riot, looters might break into stores and steal merchandise or cash registers.
  • In a news report about civil unrest, a journalist might say, “Looters ransacked several businesses in the area, taking advantage of the chaos.”
  • In a discussion about the consequences of looting, someone might argue, “While the cause of the protest may be important, looting only undermines the message and hurts innocent business owners.”

60. Kleptomaniac

A kleptomaniac is someone who has an uncontrollable urge to steal, often without any personal gain or need for the items they take. It is considered a mental disorder characterized by the inability to resist the impulse to steal.

  • For example, a kleptomaniac might compulsively steal small items like pens or jewelry, even if they have no use for them.
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might say, “Kleptomaniacs often struggle with feelings of guilt and shame over their uncontrollable stealing.”
  • In a movie about a character with kleptomania, a therapist might say, “We need to address the underlying issues that are driving your kleptomania in order to help you control your impulses.”

61. Plunderer

This term refers to a person who steals valuable items or goods, often in a forceful or aggressive manner. “Plunderer” is a more formal term for a thief, often associated with acts of looting or pillaging in historical contexts.

  • For example, in a pirate-themed movie, a character might be referred to as a skilled plunderer.
  • In a discussion about ancient civilizations, one might mention, “The plunderers of ancient tombs often sought valuable artifacts.”
  • A historian might describe the actions of a conquering army as, “The plunderers left no stone unturned in their quest for riches.”

62. Pocket-picker

This term refers to a thief who specializes in stealing items from people’s pockets, often without their knowledge or consent. “Pocket-picker” is a colloquial term used to describe a skilled pickpocket.

  • For instance, in a crowded market, a pocket-picker might be able to steal someone’s wallet without them noticing.
  • A traveler might warn others, “Watch out for pocket-pickers in crowded tourist areas.”
  • A police officer might say, “Pocket-pickers often work in teams, distracting their victims while one of them steals.”

63. Cutpurse

This term refers to a thief who steals items from people’s pockets or purses. “Cutpurse” is an older term that originated in the 16th century and was used to describe thieves who would cut the purses or pockets of their victims to steal their valuables.

  • For example, in a historical novel set in Victorian England, a character might be described as a cutpurse.
  • A museum curator might discuss the techniques of cutpurses, saying, “They were skilled in the art of stealing without being detected.”
  • A historian might mention, “Cutpurses were a common problem in crowded areas during the Renaissance.”