Top 39 Slang For To Conclude – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to wrapping up a conversation or an argument, finding the right words to conclude can be crucial. Whether you’re looking to sound more casual or add a touch of flair to your language, our team has got you covered. Join us as we break down the top slang for to conclude that will have you ending conversations like a pro in no time!

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1. Wrap up

To “wrap up” means to finish or complete something, often referring to the final stages or conclusion of a task or event.

  • For example, a meeting facilitator might say, “Let’s wrap up the discussion and move on to the next agenda item.”
  • In a sports game, a commentator might say, “The team needs to wrap up the game and secure the win.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Please wrap up your projects and submit them by the end of the week.”

2. Tie up

To “tie up” means to bring something to a close or to finish off the remaining tasks or loose ends.

  • For instance, a project manager might say, “Let’s tie up any loose ends before we present the final product.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I just need to tie up a few more details before we can finalize the plans.”
  • A writer might explain, “The last chapter of the book will tie up all the storylines and provide a satisfying conclusion.”

3. Close out

To “close out” means to complete or finalize something, often referring to the final steps or actions needed to bring a process or task to an end.

  • For example, a financial advisor might say, “Let’s close out this quarter’s accounts and prepare for the next.”
  • In a business transaction, someone might say, “We need to close out the deal and sign the contract.”
  • A project manager might explain, “Once we close out this phase, we can move on to the next stage of the project.”

4. Finish off

To “finish off” means to complete or conclude something with a final action or step, often indicating the last task or action needed to bring something to an end.

  • For instance, a chef might say, “Let’s finish off this dish with a garnish and it’ll be ready to serve.”
  • In a game, a player might say, “I just need to finish off this level and then I can move on to the next.”
  • A speaker might conclude their presentation by saying, “To finish off, I’d like to leave you with a final thought.”

5. Wind up

To “wind up” means to bring something to a conclusion or end, often indicating the final stages or actions needed to complete a task or event.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let’s wind up this lesson by reviewing the main points.”
  • In a performance, a musician might say, “We’ll wind up the concert with our most popular song.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “We need to focus and give it our all to wind up the season on a high note.”

6. Draw to a close

This phrase is used to describe the act of coming to an end or reaching a conclusion. It implies that something is nearing its completion.

  • For example, “The meeting drew to a close with a final vote.”
  • In a sports game, a commentator might say, “As the clock winds down, the match is drawing to a close.”
  • A teacher might announce, “We only have a few minutes left, so let’s draw the lesson to a close.”

7. Call it a day

This expression means to stop working or end an activity for the day. It implies that one has completed enough for the current day.

  • For instance, a supervisor might say, “It’s been a long day, let’s call it a day and resume tomorrow.”
  • In a team project, a member might suggest, “We’ve made good progress, let’s call it a day and reconvene in the morning.”
  • A person might reflect, “I’ve accomplished my goals for today, it’s time to call it a day.”

8. Put an end to

This phrase means to bring something to a definitive end or halt. It implies taking action to prevent further continuation.

  • For example, “The company decided to put an end to the project due to budget constraints.”
  • In a conflict, a mediator might intervene and say, “It’s time to put an end to this dispute and find a resolution.”
  • A person might declare, “I’m putting an end to this unhealthy habit and starting a new chapter.”

9. Bring to a close

This phrase is similar to “draw to a close” and describes the act of ending or finishing something. It implies the intentional action of bringing something to its final stage.

  • For instance, “The event was brought to a close with a closing ceremony.”
  • In a speech, a speaker might say, “In conclusion, I would like to bring this discussion to a close.”
  • A writer might conclude a story by saying, “And so, the chapter was brought to a close.”

10. Cap off

This phrase means to complete something in a memorable or impressive way. It implies adding a final touch or highlight to the conclusion.

  • For example, “The chef capped off the meal with a decadent dessert.”
  • In a presentation, a speaker might say, “To cap off this talk, let’s look at some inspiring success stories.”
  • A musician might end a concert by saying, “Thank you all for coming, we’ll cap off the night with one last song.”

11. Put the finishing touches on

This phrase means to add the final details or make the final adjustments to something in order to complete it.

  • For example, “I just need to put the finishing touches on this report before I submit it.”
  • A person might say, “I’m putting the finishing touches on my presentation for tomorrow’s meeting.”
  • When decorating a room, someone might say, “I’m almost done, just need to put the finishing touches on the curtains.”

12. Round off

To “round off” means to bring something to a smooth or complete finish.

  • For instance, “Let’s round off the project by tying up any loose ends.”
  • A teacher might say, “We’re going to round off the lesson by reviewing what we’ve learned.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “To round off our discussion, I’d like to summarize the main points.”

13. Call it quits

This phrase means to decide to stop or end something, usually when it’s not going well or when there is no further benefit.

  • For example, “We’ve been arguing for hours, let’s just call it quits and agree to disagree.”
  • In a game or competition, someone might say, “I’m exhausted, let’s call it quits for today.”
  • A person in a failing relationship might say, “We’ve tried everything, it’s time to call it quits.”

14. Bring to an end

This phrase means to finish or conclude something, often with the intention of putting an end to it.

  • For instance, “It’s time to bring this discussion to an end and make a decision.”
  • A manager might say, “We need to bring the project to an end by the end of the week.”
  • In a speech, someone might say, “In conclusion, I’d like to bring this presentation to an end.”

15. Come to a close

To “come to a close” means to reach the end or conclusion of something.

  • For example, “The conference is coming to a close with a closing ceremony.”
  • A person might say, “As the year comes to a close, let’s reflect on our achievements.”
  • When a meeting is ending, someone might say, “We’re coming to a close, any final thoughts before we adjourn?”

16. Wrap things up

This phrase means to bring an activity or task to an end. It can be used in various contexts, both formal and informal.

  • For example, in a meeting, the chairperson might say, “Let’s wrap things up and make a decision.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I need to wrap things up here so I can catch my train.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “It’s time to wrap things up and hand in your assignments.”

17. Close the book on

This expression means to bring something to a definitive end or conclusion. It implies that the matter has been settled and is no longer open for discussion or consideration.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m ready to close the book on that chapter of my life.”
  • In a legal case, a lawyer might state, “We can finally close the book on this matter now that the verdict has been reached.”
  • A manager might tell their team, “Let’s close the book on this project and move on to the next one.”

18. Put a lid on

This phrase means to control or suppress something, usually in a forceful or decisive manner. It implies the need to contain or limit a situation or behavior.

  • For example, a parent might say to their child, “Put a lid on your temper!”
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “Let’s put a lid on this discussion before things escalate.”
  • A supervisor might tell their employees, “We need to put a lid on the rumors and focus on our work.”

19. Bring to a conclusion

This phrase means to reach the end or final stage of something. It suggests the completion of a process or activity.

  • For instance, a researcher might say, “After months of data collection, we can finally bring the study to a conclusion.”
  • In a negotiation, someone might state, “We need to bring these talks to a conclusion and finalize the agreement.”
  • A writer might conclude their essay by saying, “In summary, the evidence presented brings us to the following conclusion.”

20. Draw a line under

This expression means to mark the end or resolution of something, often in order to move forward or start anew. It suggests the need to acknowledge and accept the conclusion of a situation.

  • For example, after a breakup, someone might say, “It’s time to draw a line under this relationship and focus on myself.”
  • In a business decision, a manager might state, “Let’s draw a line under this failed project and learn from our mistakes.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “We can’t change the past, so let’s draw a line under that loss and focus on the next game.”

21. Sign off

To sign off means to finish or end something, often in a formal or official manner.

  • For example, a news anchor might say, “And that’s all for tonight. I’m signing off.”
  • In a work email, someone might write, “I’ve completed the report. I’ll sign off and submit it now.”
  • When wrapping up a meeting, a presenter might say, “Before we sign off, are there any final questions?”

22. Button up

To button up means to wrap up or finalize something, often with attention to detail or thoroughness.

  • For instance, a project manager might say, “Let’s button up all loose ends before the deadline.”
  • In a conversation about completing a task, someone might say, “Just a few more things to button up and then we’re done.”
  • When discussing the final steps of a project, a team leader might say, “After we finish testing, we can button up the project and launch it.”

23. Top it off

To top it off means to finish something with a flourish or to add a final touch that enhances or completes it.

  • For example, after a successful performance, someone might say, “We received a standing ovation, and to top it off, we were invited to perform again.”
  • In a discussion about a delicious meal, someone might say, “The dessert was incredible and topped off the meal perfectly.”
  • When recounting a series of unfortunate events, someone might say, “First I lost my keys, then it started raining, and to top it off, I missed the bus.”

24. Close the chapter

To close the chapter means to bring something to an end, often with a sense of finality or resolution.

  • For instance, after a difficult breakup, someone might say, “I’m ready to close the chapter on that relationship and move forward.”
  • In a discussion about a long-standing issue, someone might say, “It’s time to close the chapter on this problem and find a solution.”
  • When reflecting on a challenging period in life, someone might say, “I’m finally ready to close the chapter on that chapter of my life and start fresh.”

25. Put to bed

To put to bed means to finish or complete something, often with the intention of no longer needing to address or work on it.

  • For example, a writer might say, “I finally put the finishing touches on my novel and put it to bed.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “Let’s put this task to bed so we can move on to the next one.”
  • When discussing a problem that has been resolved, someone might say, “We were able to put that issue to bed and move forward.”

26. Hang it up

This phrase is often used to suggest that someone should stop pursuing a particular course of action or end a certain activity.

  • For example, if someone is struggling with a task and not making progress, you might say, “It’s time to hang it up and try something else.”
  • In a sports context, if a team is losing by a significant margin and has no chance of winning, a commentator might say, “They should hang it up and focus on the next game.”
  • If someone is persistently arguing a point that they can’t support, you might say, “You’re just making a fool of yourself. Hang it up.”

27. Settle up

This phrase is commonly used when someone needs to pay off a debt or fulfill a financial obligation.

  • For instance, if you and a friend go out for dinner and they cover the bill, you might say, “Let me know how much I owe you so I can settle up.”
  • In a business context, if a company owes money to a supplier, they might say, “We need to settle up with our vendors before the end of the month.”
  • If someone has borrowed money from you and you want them to repay it, you can say, “It’s time for you to settle up and give me back what you owe.”

28. Put the kibosh on

This phrase is used to describe the act of stopping or preventing something from taking place.

  • For example, if a plan or project is not working out as expected, you might say, “We need to put the kibosh on this and come up with a new strategy.”
  • In a social context, if someone suggests a plan or activity that you don’t want to participate in, you can say, “I’m going to put the kibosh on that idea and suggest something else.”
  • If someone is talking about doing something that you consider dangerous or risky, you might say, “I think it’s best to put the kibosh on that idea and avoid any potential trouble.”

29. Finish the job

This phrase is used to emphasize the importance of completing a task or assignment without leaving it unfinished.

  • For instance, if someone starts a project but doesn’t follow through, you might say, “You need to finish the job and not leave it half-done.”
  • In a work context, if a colleague is procrastinating or not putting in enough effort, you can say, “It’s time to step up and finish the job properly.”
  • If someone is struggling to complete a task and needs encouragement, you might say, “You’re almost there, just stay focused and finish the job.”

30. Knock it off

This phrase is often used to tell someone to stop doing something that is irritating, disruptive, or inappropriate.

  • For example, if someone is making loud noises in a quiet environment, you might say, “Hey, knock it off and be considerate of others.”
  • In a playful context, if someone is teasing or joking around in a way that is starting to annoy you, you can say, “Okay, that’s enough. Knock it off.”
  • If someone is engaging in behavior that is disrespectful or inappropriate, you might say, “You need to knock it off and show some respect.”

31. Terminate

This word is often used to indicate the end or completion of something. It can be used in various contexts to convey the idea of concluding or closing something.

  • For example, a supervisor might say, “Let’s terminate the meeting and reconvene tomorrow.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might suggest, “We should terminate this task and move on to the next.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I’m going to terminate this relationship once and for all!”

32. Close the book

This phrase is used to signify the finalization or conclusion of something. It implies that a chapter or phase is ending and it’s time to move on.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “Now that we’ve covered all the topics, let’s close the book on this unit.”
  • In a conversation about a past event, someone might say, “It’s time to close the book on that chapter of my life.”
  • A person might reflect, “I’m ready to close the book on this argument and find a resolution.”

33. Put a lid on it

This expression is used to indicate the need to stop or bring an end to something. It suggests that it’s time to stop talking or taking action on a particular matter.

  • For example, a parent might tell their child, “Put a lid on it and stop arguing.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s put a lid on this discussion and move on to the next agenda item.”
  • A person might advise, “If you want to avoid trouble, put a lid on it and keep your opinions to yourself.”

34. Shut it down

This phrase is commonly used to signify the act of ending or concluding something. It can be used in various situations to indicate the need to stop or bring an activity to a close.

  • For instance, a coach might yell, “Shut it down and give me your best effort!”
  • In a conversation about a party, someone might say, “We need to shut it down at midnight to comply with noise regulations.”
  • A person might exclaim, “It’s time to shut it down and call it a night!”

35. Drop the curtain

This phrase is often used metaphorically to indicate the closing or conclusion of something, particularly a performance or event. It suggests that it’s time to bring the curtain down and end the show.

  • For example, a theater director might say, “It’s time to drop the curtain and wrap up the play.”
  • In a discussion about a long-running TV series, someone might comment, “They really dropped the curtain on that show with a satisfying finale.”
  • A person might declare, “It’s time to drop the curtain on this project and celebrate our success!”

36. Settle

This slang term means to bring something to a conclusion or to reach a final decision or agreement. It can also imply resolving a dispute or finding a solution to a problem.

  • For example, in a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s settle this issue once and for all.”
  • In a negotiation, a person might suggest, “We need to settle on a price that works for both parties.”
  • When discussing a decision, someone might state, “I’ve settled on the best course of action.”

37. Conclude

To conclude means to bring something to an end or to reach a final determination or judgment. It can also refer to summarizing or finishing a discussion or argument.

  • For instance, at the end of a presentation, a speaker might say, “To conclude, I want to emphasize the main points.”
  • When wrapping up a debate, one might assert, “Based on the evidence presented, we can conclude that the argument is flawed.”
  • In a written report, a person might state, “In conclusion, the study found a strong correlation between exercise and mental health.”

38. Finalize

This slang term means to complete or finish something, often by making a final decision or taking the last steps necessary for completion.

  • For example, when planning an event, someone might say, “We need to finalize the guest list.”
  • In a business context, a person might state, “We’re finalizing the details of the contract.”
  • When discussing a project, someone might assert, “Once we finalize the budget, we can move forward.”

39. End

To end means to bring something to a close or to reach a point where there is no further continuation. It can also refer to concluding or finishing a task or activity.

  • For instance, at the end of a movie, a character might say, “And they lived happily ever after. The end.”
  • When wrapping up a conversation, one might say, “I think we’ve reached the end of our discussion.”
  • In a sports game, a commentator might declare, “And that’s the end of the match. The home team wins!”
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