Top 51 Slang For Too Many – Meaning & Usage

Ever found yourself in a situation where there’s just too many of something? Whether it’s tasks on your to-do list or desserts on the buffet table, we’ve all been there. But fear not, because we’ve got you covered with a list of the top slang terms that perfectly encapsulate that feeling of overwhelming abundance. Get ready to chuckle and nod in agreement as we break down the language of “too many” in a fun and informative way.

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1. Tons

This slang term is used to describe an excessive amount of something.

  • For example, “I have tons of homework to do tonight.”
  • Someone might say, “I ate tons of pizza at the party last night.”
  • In a conversation about a shopping spree, a person might mention, “I bought tons of clothes during the sale.”

2. Loads

This slang term is used to emphasize the abundance or excessiveness of something.

  • For instance, “I have loads of laundry to do this weekend.”
  • Someone might say, “I ate loads of ice cream at the buffet.”
  • In a conversation about gifts, a person might mention, “I received loads of presents on my birthday.”

3. Oodles

This slang term is used to emphasize a vast amount or number of something.

  • For example, “I have oodles of free time during the summer.”
  • Someone might say, “I drank oodles of coffee to stay awake.”
  • In a conversation about a book collection, a person might mention, “I have oodles of novels on my bookshelf.”

4. Zillions

This slang term is used to emphasize an incredibly high or infinite amount of something.

  • For instance, “There are zillions of stars in the night sky.”
  • Someone might say, “I have zillions of unread emails in my inbox.”
  • In a conversation about a crowded event, a person might mention, “There were zillions of people at the concert.”

5. Myriad

This slang term is used to describe an immense or vast quantity of something.

  • For example, “There are myriad possibilities for our vacation.”
  • Someone might say, “I have myriad responsibilities at work.”
  • In a conversation about options, a person might mention, “There are myriad restaurants to choose from in this city.”

6. Excessive

Refers to something that is more than what is necessary or appropriate. It suggests an abundance or overindulgence in quantity.

  • For example, “She has an excessive amount of clothes in her closet.”
  • In a discussion about spending habits, someone might say, “I need to cut back on my excessive shopping.”
  • A person describing a party might say, “There was excessive noise and chaos throughout the night.”

7. Overflowing

Describes a situation where something is filled or filled up to the point of overflowing. It implies an excess or an overwhelming amount.

  • For instance, “The sink was overflowing with dirty dishes.”
  • In a conversation about emotions, someone might say, “I’m overflowing with happiness.”
  • A person describing a crowded event might say, “The stadium was overflowing with enthusiastic fans.”

8. Surplus

Refers to an amount that is more than what is needed or required. It suggests an extra or leftover quantity.

  • For example, “The store had a surplus of canned goods.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might say, “We need to reduce our surplus expenses.”
  • A person describing a harvest might say, “There was a surplus of apples this year.”

9. Overabundance

Describes a situation where there is an excessive or plentiful amount of something. It implies a surplus or an overwhelming quantity.

  • For instance, “There was an overabundance of food at the buffet.”
  • In a conversation about options, someone might say, “There is an overabundance of choices.”
  • A person describing a collection might say, “She has an overabundance of shoes.”

10. Superabundance

Refers to an extremely large or excessive amount of something. It suggests an abundance or an overwhelming quantity.

  • For example, “There was a superabundance of flowers in the garden.”
  • In a discussion about resources, someone might say, “We have a superabundance of fresh water.”
  • A person describing a sale might say, “The store had a superabundance of discounted items.”

11. Galore

This term is used to describe a large or excessive amount of something. It implies an overwhelming quantity or number.

  • For example, “There were desserts galore at the buffet.”
  • A person might say, “There are job opportunities galore in the city.”
  • Another might exclaim, “There were discounts galore at the end-of-season sale.”

12. Innumerable

This word refers to a quantity that is too large to be counted or numbered. It suggests that there are so many of something that it is impossible to determine the exact number.

  • For instance, “There are innumerable stars in the sky.”
  • A person might say, “There are innumerable ways to solve this problem.”
  • Another might comment, “The internet offers innumerable resources for learning.”

13. A plethora

This phrase is used to indicate an excessive or overabundant amount of something. It suggests that there is more than enough of a particular thing.

  • For example, “The store had a plethora of options to choose from.”
  • A person might say, “We have a plethora of food for the party.”
  • Another might mention, “The market is flooded with a plethora of smartphone choices.”

14. A glut

This term refers to an excessive supply or amount of something. It implies that there is more of a particular thing than is needed or wanted.

  • For instance, “There is a glut of cheap products in the market.”
  • A person might say, “The industry is experiencing a glut of unsold inventory.”
  • Another might comment, “The holiday season often leads to a glut of advertisements.”

15. A deluge

This word is used to describe a sudden and overwhelming amount or flow of something. It suggests a rapid and intense inundation.

  • For example, “After the announcement, there was a deluge of messages.”
  • A person might say, “The city experienced a deluge of rain during the storm.”
  • Another might mention, “The website crashed due to a deluge of traffic.”

16. A flood

This phrase is often used to describe an overwhelming amount of something.

  • For example, “There was a flood of emails in my inbox this morning.”
  • A person might say, “I have a flood of assignments due next week.”
  • Another might exclaim, “The store had a flood of customers during the holiday sale.”

17. A swarm

This term is used to describe a large number of people or things gathered together in a chaotic or busy manner.

  • For instance, “There was a swarm of protesters outside the courthouse.”
  • A person might say, “I was surrounded by a swarm of fans after the concert.”
  • Another might comment, “The kitchen was a swarm of activity during the dinner rush.”

18. A horde

This word is used to describe a large and unruly crowd or group of people.

  • For example, “There was a horde of shoppers at the mall on Black Friday.”
  • A person might say, “The stadium was filled with a horde of excited fans.”
  • Another might comment, “The city streets were overrun by a horde of protesters.”

19. A mass

This term is used to describe a large quantity or number of something, often in a generalized or unspecified way.

  • For instance, “There was a mass of paperwork on my desk.”
  • A person might say, “I have a mass of laundry to do this weekend.”
  • Another might comment, “The field was covered in a mass of wildflowers.”

20. A boatload

This phrase is used to emphasize a very large quantity or number of something.

  • For example, “I have a boatload of work to do before the deadline.”
  • A person might say, “We caught a boatload of fish on our fishing trip.”
  • Another might comment, “The concert venue was filled with a boatload of excited fans.”

21. A slew

This slang phrase is used to describe a large or excessive amount of something. It is often used to emphasize the abundance or overwhelming nature of a particular thing.

  • For example, “There were a slew of emails waiting in my inbox when I got back from vacation.”
  • In a conversation about a busy day at work, someone might say, “I had a slew of meetings and deadlines to tackle.”
  • A person describing a crowded event might comment, “There were a slew of people at the concert last night.”

22. A myriad

This term is used to express a large or indefinite number of something. It suggests that there are too many to count or quantify.

  • For instance, “There are a myriad of possibilities for how this situation could unfold.”
  • In a discussion about options, someone might say, “We have a myriad of choices to consider.”
  • A person expressing frustration might exclaim, “I have a myriad of tasks to complete before the deadline!”

23. A gazillion

This slang term is a playful exaggeration used to emphasize that there is an extremely large or overwhelming number of something. It is often used in a light-hearted or humorous context.

  • For example, “I have a gazillion things to do before the party tonight!”
  • In a conversation about a crowded shopping mall, someone might say, “There were a gazillion people there, it was insane.”
  • A person exaggerating the amount of food they ate might joke, “I must have eaten a gazillion cookies!”

24. A heap

This slang phrase is used to describe a significant or substantial amount of something. It implies that there is a notable accumulation or pile of the particular thing being referred to.

  • For instance, “There’s a heap of laundry that needs to be done.”
  • In a discussion about work, someone might say, “I have a heap of paperwork on my desk.”
  • A person talking about a messy room might comment, “There’s a heap of clothes on the floor!”

25. A mountain

This term is used figuratively to represent a significant or overwhelming amount of something. It compares the quantity to the size and imposing nature of a mountain.

  • For example, “I have a mountain of paperwork to get through before the end of the week.”
  • In a conversation about a challenging task, someone might say, “I feel like I’m climbing a mountain trying to finish this project.”
  • A person expressing frustration might exclaim, “I have a mountain of emails to respond to!”

26. A truckload

This phrase is used to describe an excessive or overwhelming amount of something. It implies that there is so much of it that it would require a truck to transport.

  • For example, “She bought a truckload of groceries for the party.”
  • A person might say, “I have a truckload of work to do before the deadline.”
  • Someone might complain, “There were a truckload of people at the concert, it was so crowded.”

27. A bunch

This slang term is used to describe a large or significant amount of something. It implies that there is a considerable quantity, but not to the point of being overwhelming.

  • For instance, “He brought a bunch of flowers for his girlfriend.”
  • A person might say, “I have a bunch of errands to run today.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “We caught a bunch of fish on our fishing trip!”

28. A stack

This phrase is used to describe a substantial or significant amount of something. It implies that the quantity is enough to form a stack or pile.

  • For example, “He won a stack of cash at the casino.”
  • A person might say, “I have a stack of paperwork on my desk.”
  • Someone might boast, “I have a stack of books to read over the summer.”

29. A bundle

This slang term is used to describe a large collection or quantity of something. It implies that the amount is significant and often comes bundled or packaged together.

  • For instance, “She made a bundle selling her old clothes.”
  • A person might say, “I have a bundle of laundry to do.”
  • Someone might complain, “He charged me a bundle for that repair!”

30. A ton

This phrase is used to describe an excessive or overwhelming amount of something. It implies that there is so much of it that it would weigh a ton.

  • For example, “She has a ton of homework to do.”
  • A person might say, “I have a ton of meetings today.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “There were a ton of people at the party, it was crazy!”

31. A load

This phrase is used to describe a large amount or quantity of something. It can refer to an excessive or overwhelming amount.

  • For example, “He brought a load of snacks to the party.”
  • In a conversation about work, someone might say, “I have a load of paperwork to finish.”
  • Another example is, “I can’t believe she bought a load of clothes at the mall.”

32. A cluster

This term is used to describe a group or collection of things or people that are closely packed or gathered together. It can imply a chaotic or disorganized grouping.

  • For instance, “There was a cluster of people waiting outside the concert venue.”
  • In a discussion about traffic, someone might say, “There’s always a cluster of cars during rush hour.”
  • Another example is, “The store had a cluster of different products on display.”

33. Overkill

This word is used to describe a situation where too much of something is used or done, resulting in an excessive or unnecessary outcome.

  • For example, “Using a sledgehammer to crack a nut is overkill.”
  • In a conversation about decorations, someone might say, “I think adding more lights would be overkill.”
  • Another example is, “She wore a full face of makeup to the gym, which seemed like overkill.”

34. Overflow

This term is used to describe a situation where something exceeds its capacity or limit, often resulting in spilling or spreading out beyond its boundaries.

  • For instance, “The sink overflowed with water.”
  • In a discussion about a crowded event, someone might say, “The venue was at capacity, and there was an overflow of people outside.”
  • Another example is, “The inbox was full, and there was an overflow of unread emails.”

35. Surfeit

This word is used to describe an excessive or surplus amount of something, often implying that it is more than necessary or desired.

  • For example, “There was a surfeit of food at the buffet.”
  • In a conversation about options, someone might say, “There’s a surfeit of choices, I don’t know where to start.”
  • Another example is, “He had a surfeit of clothes in his closet, but still complained about having nothing to wear.”

36. Glut

A “glut” refers to an abundance or overabundance of something. It is often used to describe a situation where there is too much of a particular thing or resource.

  • For example, “There is a glut of apartments on the market right now.”
  • In a discussion about the stock market, someone might say, “There was a glut of selling which caused the prices to plummet.”
  • A food critic might write, “The buffet had a glut of dessert options, making it difficult to choose.”

37. Superfluous

“Superfluous” is used to describe something that is unnecessary, excessive, or surplus to requirements. It implies that there is more of something than is needed or desired.

  • For instance, “The decorations on the cake were superfluous and took away from the taste.”
  • In a conversation about packing for a trip, someone might say, “I always end up bringing superfluous items that I never use.”
  • A reviewer might write, “The movie had superfluous scenes that didn’t contribute to the plot.”

38. Exorbitant

When something is described as “exorbitant,” it means that it is unreasonably high or excessive in price, cost, or amount. It suggests that the price or value is so far beyond what is considered reasonable or fair.

  • For example, “The price of the concert tickets was exorbitant.”
  • In a discussion about rent prices, someone might say, “The cost of living in this city is exorbitant.”
  • A shopper might complain, “The price of designer handbags is exorbitant compared to their actual value.”

39. Plethora

A “plethora” refers to an excessive or overabundant amount of something. It indicates that there is a large quantity or variety of something, often more than is necessary or desired.

  • For instance, “The store had a plethora of options to choose from.”
  • In a conversation about book recommendations, someone might say, “I have a plethora of books on my reading list.”
  • A food critic might write, “The restaurant offered a plethora of appetizers, making it difficult to decide.”

40. Profusion

“Profusion” is used to describe a large quantity or display of something. It suggests that there is an abundant or plentiful amount of something.

  • For example, “The garden was filled with a profusion of colorful flowers.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might say, “The museum had a profusion of paintings from different time periods.”
  • A traveler might describe a market as having “a profusion of unique souvenirs.”
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41. Flood

When something is flooding, it means there is an excessive amount of it. It can be used to describe an overwhelming quantity or a situation where there is too much of something.

  • For example, “The store was flooded with customers during the sale.”
  • A person might say, “I’m flooded with work right now, I don’t have time for anything else.”
  • Another example could be, “The internet was flooded with memes after the viral video was released.”

42. Overindulgence

Overindulgence refers to the act of consuming or experiencing something in excessive amounts, often beyond what is considered normal or healthy.

  • For instance, “He suffers from overindulgence in food and drinks.”
  • A person might say, “I need to cut back on my overindulgence in shopping.”
  • Another example could be, “Her overindulgence in social media is affecting her productivity.”

43. Saturation

Saturation refers to a state of being filled or soaked to capacity. In slang, it is often used to describe a situation where there is an excessive amount of something, to the point of it becoming overwhelming or tiresome.

  • For example, “The market is saturated with similar products.”
  • A person might say, “I’m tired of seeing the same trends everywhere, it’s oversaturation.”
  • Another example could be, “The music industry is facing oversaturation with too many artists trying to make it big.”

44. Extravagant

Extravagant refers to something that is characterized by excessive or unnecessary luxury, often beyond what is considered normal or practical.

  • For instance, “She threw an extravagant party with a red carpet and live performances.”
  • A person might say, “His taste in clothing is always extravagant, with designer brands from head to toe.”
  • Another example could be, “The hotel room was decorated in an extravagant style with gold accents and chandeliers.”

45. Lavish

Lavish refers to an act of showing or giving something in a generous and excessive manner. It is often associated with luxury and opulence.

  • For example, “They hosted a lavish dinner party with a five-course meal.”
  • A person might say, “He always gives lavish gifts to his loved ones, regardless of the occasion.”
  • Another example could be, “The wedding was a lavish affair, with a grand venue and extravagant decorations.”

46. Flooded

This term is used to describe a situation where there is an excessive amount of something, often to the point of being overwhelming or unmanageable. It can be used to describe a physical space or a person’s schedule or workload.

  • For example, “I walked into the office and it was flooded with paperwork.”
  • A student might say, “I’m flooded with assignments this week, I don’t know how I’ll get them all done.”
  • Someone might comment on a crowded event, “The concert was flooded with people, it was hard to move around.”

47. Swamped

Similar to “flooded,” this term is used to describe a situation where there is an excessive amount of something, particularly when referring to a person’s schedule or workload. It implies being overwhelmed or burdened with too many tasks or responsibilities.

  • For instance, “I’m swamped with meetings today, I don’t have time for anything else.”
  • A business owner might say, “The holiday season always leaves me swamped with orders.”
  • A student might complain, “I’m swamped with homework, I can’t go out tonight.”

48. Drowned

This term is used metaphorically to describe being overwhelmed or consumed by something, typically in a negative or stressful way. It implies feeling helpless or unable to cope with a large quantity or intensity of something.

  • For example, “I’m drowned with emails, I can’t keep up.”
  • A person might say, “I feel drowned with responsibilities, I need a break.”
  • Someone might comment on a busy restaurant, “The staff is drowned with customers, it’s taking forever to get served.”

49. Saturated

This term is used to describe a situation where there is an excessive or overwhelming amount of something, often to the point of being completely filled or unable to hold any more. It can refer to physical spaces, markets, or even people’s attention or interest.

  • For instance, “The market is saturated with similar products, it’s hard to stand out.”
  • A person might say, “I’m saturated with information, I can’t process anymore.”
  • Someone might comment on a crowded party, “The room is saturated with people, it’s hard to move around.”

50. Crammed

This term is used to describe a situation where there is an excessive amount of something, often in a confined space. It implies a lack of room or space due to the overwhelming quantity of something.

  • For example, “The suitcase is crammed with clothes, I can barely close it.”
  • A student might say, “The lecture hall is crammed with students, it’s hard to find a seat.”
  • Someone might comment on a crowded subway, “The train is crammed with people, it’s uncomfortable to stand.”

51. Stuffed

This term is used to describe a feeling of being completely full or overfilled, often after eating a large amount of food.

  • For example, after a Thanksgiving feast, someone might say, “I can’t eat another bite, I’m stuffed!”
  • When talking about a buffet, someone might comment, “I went back for seconds and now I’m stuffed.”
  • A person might complain, “I ate too much pizza and now I feel so stuffed.”