Top 40 Slang For Troubled – Meaning & Usage

Life can throw us curveballs, leaving us feeling a bit troubled at times. But fear not, as we’ve got your back with a curated list of the most relatable and trendy slang for troubled that will have you nodding your head in agreement and maybe even cracking a smile. Let’s dive in and explore the language of navigating life’s challenges with a touch of humor and understanding.

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1. Distraught

Distraught is used to describe someone who is deeply distressed or overwhelmed with emotions.
-For example, “She was distraught after receiving the news of her father’s passing.”
-A person might say, “I was absolutely distraught when I failed my final exam.”
-In a conversation about a difficult breakup, someone might say, “She was distraught for weeks after the relationship ended.”

2. Agonized

Agonized is used to describe someone who is suffering from extreme mental or emotional anguish.
-For instance, “He looked agonized as he tried to make a difficult decision.”
-In a discussion about a tragic event, someone might say, “The families of the victims were agonized by the loss.”
-A person might describe their own feelings by saying, “I was agonized by the thought of disappointing my parents.”

3. Tormented

Tormented refers to someone who is experiencing intense anguish or suffering.
-For example, “He lived a tormented life, haunted by his past.”
-In a conversation about a troubled artist, someone might say, “His paintings reflected the tormented state of his mind.”
-A person might say, “I am tormented by the memories of my traumatic childhood.”

4. Wrought-up

Wrought-up is used to describe someone who is highly agitated, anxious, or upset.
-For instance, “She was wrought-up with worry about her upcoming presentation.”
-In a discussion about a heated argument, someone might say, “After the argument, he was all wrought-up and couldn’t calm down.”
-A person might say, “I get easily wrought-up when I have to speak in public.”

5. Perturbed

Perturbed describes someone who is feeling unsettled, bothered, or disturbed.
-For example, “She was perturbed by the strange noises coming from the basement.”
-In a conversation about a disturbing news article, someone might say, “The details of the crime really perturbed me.”
-A person might say, “I feel perturbed whenever I have to confront someone about a difficult issue.”

6. Disquieted

To feel uneasy or restless, often due to anxiety or worry. The term “disquieted” describes a state of inner turmoil or unease.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’ve been feeling disquieted ever since I heard the news.”
  • In a discussion about personal struggles, someone might share, “I’ve been disquieted by my recent failures.”
  • A character in a book might be described as “disquieted” when faced with a difficult decision.

7. Harrowed

To feel distressed or deeply troubled, often due to a traumatic experience or emotional turmoil. The term “harrowed” signifies a state of extreme distress or anguish.

  • For example, a person might say, “I was harrowed by the loss of a loved one.”
  • In a discussion about the impact of war, someone might share, “The soldiers returned home harrowed by their experiences.”
  • A character in a movie might be portrayed as “harrowed” after witnessing a horrific event.

8. Anguished

To feel intense physical or emotional pain, often accompanied by a sense of helplessness or despair. The term “anguished” describes a state of extreme suffering or torment.

  • For instance, a person might exclaim, “I’m anguished by the betrayal of a close friend.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might share, “I’ve been feeling anguished for months, unable to find relief.”
  • A character in a play might be depicted as “anguished” when faced with a heartbreaking decision.

9. Beset

To be plagued or troubled by something, often in a persistent or overwhelming manner. The term “beset” conveys a sense of being surrounded or overwhelmed by difficulties.

  • For example, a person might say, “I was beset by financial troubles after losing my job.”
  • In a discussion about personal challenges, someone might share, “I feel beset by self-doubt and insecurities.”
  • A character in a novel might be described as “beset” when facing a series of unfortunate events.

10. Vexed

To feel annoyed, frustrated, or irritated, often due to a difficult or perplexing situation. The term “vexed” signifies a state of being bothered or troubled.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I was vexed by the constant interruptions during my work.”
  • In a discussion about customer service, someone might share, “I was vexed by the lack of professionalism from the company.”
  • A character in a TV show might be portrayed as “vexed” when dealing with a particularly challenging problem.
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11. Racked

This term is often used to describe someone who is mentally or emotionally distressed, often due to a difficult situation or problem. It can also refer to someone who is physically exhausted or in pain.

  • For example, “She was racked with guilt after her actions caused harm to others.”
  • In a discussion about personal struggles, someone might say, “I’ve been feeling racked lately, and I don’t know how to cope.”
  • A person describing a physically demanding task might say, “After lifting all those heavy boxes, my body was completely racked.”

12. Stricken

This term is used to describe someone who is deeply affected or overcome by a negative emotion or situation. It implies a sense of being overwhelmed or greatly impacted by something.

  • For instance, “He was stricken with grief when he received the news of his friend’s passing.”
  • In a conversation about a devastating event, someone might say, “The community was stricken by the natural disaster.”
  • A person describing their emotional state might say, “I feel so stricken by anxiety that it’s hard to function.”

13. Afflicted

This term refers to someone who is experiencing hardship or suffering, often due to a physical or mental condition. It implies a sense of being burdened or affected by something negative.

  • For example, “She was afflicted with a chronic illness that caused her constant pain.”
  • In a discussion about societal issues, someone might say, “The marginalized communities are often afflicted by poverty.”
  • A person describing their personal struggles might say, “I’ve been afflicted by self-doubt and it’s holding me back.”

14. Disconsolate

This term describes someone who is extremely sad, dejected, or without consolation. It implies a deep sense of grief or despair.

  • For instance, “She was disconsolate after her long-term relationship ended.”
  • In a conversation about loss, someone might say, “The disconsolate mother mourned the death of her child.”
  • A person describing their emotional state might say, “I feel so disconsolate that I can’t find joy in anything.”

15. Melancholic

This term is used to describe someone who is experiencing a deep sadness or depression. It implies a prolonged state of sorrow or melancholy.

  • For example, “He had a melancholic disposition and often withdrew from social interactions.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might say, “Many artists throughout history have been known for their melancholic temperament.”
  • A person describing their emotional state might say, “I’ve been feeling very melancholic lately and I don’t know how to shake it.”

16. Disrupted

This slang term refers to a state of being disturbed or interrupted, causing a sense of imbalance or chaos. It can also imply a disruption in plans or routines.

  • For example, “The sudden power outage disrupted our meeting.”
  • A person might say, “My sleep schedule has been disrupted lately, and it’s affecting my productivity.”
  • In a conversation about a canceled event, someone might comment, “The weather really disrupted our plans.”

17. Unsettled

When someone is unsettled, they feel uneasy or unsure about something. It can also refer to a situation or environment that is unstable or volatile.

  • For instance, “After the argument, she felt unsettled and couldn’t concentrate.”
  • A person might say, “The constant changes in my job make me feel unsettled.”
  • In a discussion about a turbulent relationship, someone might comment, “Their constant fighting left me feeling unsettled.”

18. Disturbed

Being disturbed refers to a state of emotional or mental turmoil. It can imply a sense of unease or psychological distress.

  • For example, “He seemed disturbed after watching that horror movie.”
  • A person might say, “I’m really disturbed by the recent increase in violence.”
  • In a conversation about a disturbing news article, someone might comment, “The details of the crime are truly disturbing.”

19. Upset

When someone is upset, they are emotionally distressed or agitated. It can refer to a range of negative emotions, such as anger, sadness, or frustration.

  • For instance, “She was upset when she found out she didn’t get the job.”
  • A person might say, “I was so upset with myself for making that mistake.”
  • In a discussion about a disappointing outcome, someone might comment, “I’m really upset about how the game ended.”

20. Worried

Feeling worried means being anxious or concerned about something. It implies a state of unease or fear about a potential negative outcome.

  • For example, “She was worried about her upcoming exam.”
  • A person might say, “I’m worried about my friend’s health.”
  • In a conversation about a challenging situation, someone might comment, “I’m really worried about how things will turn out.”

21. Anxious

Anxious is used to describe a feeling of unease or nervousness. It is often associated with a sense of worry or fear about something that may happen in the future.

  • For example, “I’m feeling anxious about my upcoming exam.”
  • Another usage might be, “He’s always anxious before a job interview.”
  • Someone might say, “I get anxious in crowded places.”

22. Troubled

Troubled refers to a state of distress or difficulty. It can describe someone who is experiencing emotional or personal problems.

  • For instance, “She has had a troubled past.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling troubled lately.”
  • Another example might be, “He comes from a troubled family.”

23. Wrecked

Wrecked is used to describe a state of extreme emotional or physical distress. It can indicate that someone is feeling completely overwhelmed or devastated.

  • For example, “I feel absolutely wrecked after the breakup.”
  • A person might say, “I was wrecked when I found out the news.”
  • Another usage might be, “She looked wrecked after the accident.”

24. Struggling

Struggling refers to facing difficulties or challenges in life. It can describe someone who is finding it hard to cope or succeed in a particular situation.

  • For instance, “He’s been struggling with his finances.”
  • A person might say, “I’m struggling to find a job.”
  • Another example might be, “She’s struggling with her mental health.”

25. Turmoil

Turmoil refers to a state of confusion, disorder, or chaos. It can describe a situation or a person’s emotional state when everything feels chaotic and unsettled.

  • For example, “The country is in political turmoil.”
  • A person might say, “I feel like my life is in turmoil right now.”
  • Another usage might be, “She’s going through a period of personal turmoil.”

26. Agitated

Feeling or showing agitation or annoyance.

  • For example, “She was agitated by all the noise.”
  • A person might say, “I get agitated when I have to wait in long lines.”
  • Another might say, “His constant tapping on the table is making me agitated.”

27. Distressed

Feeling or showing extreme anxiety, sorrow, or pain.

  • For instance, “She looked distressed after receiving the bad news.”
  • A person might say, “I feel distressed about the state of the world.”
  • Another might say, “The distressed look on his face told me something was wrong.”

28. Strife

Angry or bitter disagreement over fundamental issues.

  • For example, “The country has been torn apart by political strife.”
  • A person might say, “There is a lot of strife between different religious groups.”
  • Another might say, “The family was torn apart by years of strife and fighting.”

29. Disarray

A state of disorganization or untidiness.

  • For instance, “The room was in complete disarray after the party.”
  • A person might say, “My life is in disarray right now.”
  • Another might say, “The disarray in the office is making it difficult to get any work done.”

30. Discomfited

Made to feel uncomfortable or uneasy.

  • For example, “He felt discomfited by the awkward silence.”
  • A person might say, “I always feel discomfited in large crowds.”
  • Another might say, “The discomfited look on her face told me something was wrong.”

31. Disheartened

When someone is disheartened, they feel a deep sense of sadness or disappointment. It often occurs when their hopes or expectations are not met.

  • For example, “I felt disheartened when I didn’t get the job I interviewed for.”
  • A student might say, “I studied really hard for the test, so I was disheartened when I got a low grade.”
  • Someone might express their disheartenment by saying, “I had high hopes for the project, but it didn’t turn out as I expected.”

32. Disillusioned

When someone is disillusioned, they feel a sense of disappointment or betrayal, often because their beliefs or expectations have been shattered.

  • For instance, “I became disillusioned with politics after seeing how corrupt it can be.”
  • A person might say, “I used to believe in true love, but now I’m disillusioned.”
  • Someone who trusted a friend might say, “I feel so disillusioned after finding out they lied to me.”

33. Dismayed

When someone is dismayed, they feel a sense of shock, distress, or concern. It often occurs when they encounter an unexpected or troubling situation.

  • For example, “I was dismayed to find out that my favorite restaurant had closed.”
  • A person might say, “I was dismayed by the amount of litter I saw in the park.”
  • Someone might express their dismay by saying, “I can’t believe the company is laying off so many employees.”

34. Disquiet

When someone is disquieted, they feel a sense of unease, restlessness, or anxiety. It often occurs when something is bothering them or causing them to feel unsettled.

  • For instance, “The eerie silence in the house filled me with disquiet.”
  • A person might say, “I couldn’t sleep last night because of the disquiet in my mind.”
  • Someone might express their disquiet by saying, “There’s something about this place that gives me a sense of disquiet.”

35. In a pickle

When someone is in a pickle, they are in a difficult or troublesome situation. It often implies that they are facing a problem or challenge that is not easily solved.

  • For example, “I accidentally locked myself out of the house and now I’m in a pickle.”
  • A person might say, “I’m in a pickle because I forgot to bring my wallet and I need to buy something.”
  • Someone might describe their situation by saying, “I got myself in a real pickle by missing the deadline for my project.”

36. In the doghouse

This phrase is used to describe someone who is in trouble or disfavored by someone else. It implies a sense of being in a difficult or uncomfortable situation.

  • For example, “I forgot my anniversary and now I’m in the doghouse with my wife.”
  • A person might say, “I’m in the doghouse with my boss after making a mistake at work.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might mention, “Whenever my partner is mad at me, I end up in the doghouse.”

37. In a quandary

This phrase is used to describe someone who is in a state of uncertainty or indecision, often due to a difficult or complicated situation.

  • For instance, “I’m in a quandary about which job offer to accept.”
  • A person might say, “I’m in a quandary about whether to go on vacation or save money.”
  • In a discussion about moral dilemmas, someone might mention, “I found myself in a quandary when I discovered my friend was cheating on a test.”

38. In a scrape

This phrase is used to describe someone who is in a difficult or tricky situation, often due to their own actions or circumstances.

  • For example, “I got into a scrape with the law and had to pay a fine.”
  • A person might say, “I’m in a scrape with my landlord because I accidentally broke a window.”
  • In a conversation about financial troubles, someone might mention, “I’m in a scrape with my credit card debt and don’t know how to get out of it.”

39. In a stew

This phrase is used to describe someone who is in a state of worry or anxiety, often due to a specific problem or situation.

  • For instance, “I’m in a stew about my upcoming presentation.”
  • A person might say, “I’m in a stew because I lost my phone and can’t find it.”
  • In a discussion about personal problems, someone might mention, “I’m in a stew because I can’t find a job and bills are piling up.”

40. In a spot of bother

This phrase is used to describe someone who is in a difficult or troublesome situation, often due to their own actions or circumstances.

  • For example, “I’m in a spot of bother because I forgot to pay my rent.”
  • A person might say, “I’m in a spot of bother because I accidentally deleted an important file.”
  • In a conversation about travel mishaps, someone might mention, “I found myself in a spot of bother when my flight got canceled and I had nowhere to stay.”