Top 66 Slang For Troublesome – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to describing those pesky situations or people that just won’t quit, finding the right words can be a challenge. But fear not, we’ve got your back! Our team has scoured the depths of slang vocabulary to bring you a curated list of the most fitting and trendy slang for troublesome. Get ready to level up your language game and handle any sticky situations like a pro!

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1. Pain in the neck

This phrase is used to describe someone or something that is causing frustration or irritation. It implies that dealing with the person or situation is as uncomfortable and bothersome as having a literal pain in the neck.

  • For example, “My neighbor’s loud parties are a real pain in the neck.”
  • A person might say, “Dealing with all this paperwork is such a pain in the neck.”
  • Someone might complain, “My boss is always micromanaging me. He’s a real pain in the neck.”

2. Pain in the butt

Similar to “pain in the neck,” this phrase is used to describe someone or something that is causing annoyance or trouble. It implies that dealing with the person or situation is as uncomfortable and bothersome as having a literal pain in the butt.

  • For instance, “My computer keeps crashing. It’s such a pain in the butt.”
  • A person might say, “My little sister is always borrowing my clothes without asking. She’s a real pain in the butt.”
  • Someone might complain, “Dealing with customer service can be a pain in the butt sometimes.”

3. Pain in the backside

Similar to “pain in the neck” and “pain in the butt,” this phrase is used to describe someone or something that is causing annoyance or trouble. It implies that dealing with the person or situation is as uncomfortable and bothersome as having a literal pain in the backside.

  • For example, “Waiting in line at the DMV is always a pain in the backside.”
  • A person might say, “My neighbor’s barking dog is such a pain in the backside.”
  • Someone might complain, “Having to fix this broken appliance is a real pain in the backside.”

4. High-maintenance

This term is used to describe someone or something that requires a significant amount of attention, effort, or maintenance. It implies that dealing with the person or situation is demanding and often troublesome.

  • For instance, “She’s so high-maintenance. She always needs to be the center of attention.”
  • A person might say, “Owning a luxury car can be expensive and high-maintenance.”
  • Someone might complain, “My boss is very high-maintenance. He’s always changing his mind and expecting us to drop everything to accommodate him.”

5. Thorn in one’s side

This phrase is used to describe someone or something that is a constant source of annoyance or trouble. It implies that dealing with the person or situation is as irritating and bothersome as being pricked by a thorn.

  • For example, “His ex-wife is a real thorn in his side. She’s always causing problems.”
  • A person might say, “This leaky faucet is a thorn in my side. I can’t seem to fix it.”
  • Someone might complain, “My coworker is always criticizing my work. She’s a constant thorn in my side.”

6. Nuisance

Refers to someone or something that is irritating or bothersome. It is often used to describe a person or situation that causes inconvenience or annoyance.

  • For example, “My neighbor’s loud parties are such a nuisance.”
  • A person might complain, “The constant construction noise is becoming a nuisance.”
  • In a discussion about annoying habits, someone might say, “Chewing with your mouth open is such a nuisance.”

7. Pest

Refers to a person who is irritating or bothersome. It is often used to describe someone who is persistent in causing trouble or annoyance.

  • For instance, “My little brother is such a pest, always bothering me.”
  • A person might say, “That coworker is a real pest, always interrupting my work.”
  • In a conversation about annoying classmates, someone might comment, “He’s the biggest pest in our class.”

8. Aggravating

Describes something that is irritating or provoking. It is often used to express frustration or annoyance towards a person or situation.

  • For example, “The constant delays are so aggravating.”
  • A person might say, “His constant complaining is really aggravating.”
  • In a discussion about frustrating experiences, someone might comment, “Dealing with customer service can be incredibly aggravating.”

9. Irritating

Refers to something that is annoying or provoking. It is often used to describe a person or situation that causes frustration or anger.

  • For instance, “The sound of nails on a chalkboard is so irritating.”
  • A person might complain, “Her constant interruptions are really irritating.”
  • In a conversation about pet peeves, someone might say, “People who chew loudly are incredibly irritating.”

10. Bothersome

Describes something that is annoying or inconvenient. It is often used to express frustration or irritation towards a person or situation.

  • For example, “The constant phone notifications are bothersome.”
  • A person might say, “The long wait times at the doctor’s office are really bothersome.”
  • In a discussion about annoying habits, someone might comment, “Leaving dirty dishes in the sink is bothersome.”

11. Vexing

This term describes something that causes frustration or annoyance.

  • For example, “The constant buzzing of the mosquito was vexing.”
  • A person might say, “It’s so vexing when my computer freezes right in the middle of an important task.”
  • Someone might complain, “I find it vexing when people talk loudly on their cell phones in public places.”

12. Disruptive

This word refers to something or someone that causes a disturbance or interrupts the normal flow of things.

  • For instance, “The loud construction noises were disruptive to my work.”
  • A teacher might say, “Please stop talking, your disruptive behavior is disrupting the class.”
  • A person might comment, “The constant barking of the neighbor’s dog is very disruptive to our sleep.”

13. Troublesome

This term describes something or someone that causes difficulty or problems.

  • For example, “The broken air conditioner is causing troublesome heat in the house.”
  • A person might say, “I find it troublesome to navigate through the crowded streets during rush hour.”
  • Someone might complain, “Dealing with a troublesome coworker can make the work environment stressful.”

14. Obnoxious

This word refers to something or someone that is extremely unpleasant or annoying.

  • For instance, “The obnoxious smell coming from the garbage can was unbearable.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t stand his obnoxious behavior at parties.”
  • A friend might complain, “Her obnoxious laugh is so grating on my nerves.”

15. Pesky

This term describes something or someone that is annoying or bothersome, but not necessarily causing major problems.

  • For example, “The pesky flies kept buzzing around the picnic food.”
  • A person might say, “I have a pesky habit of misplacing my keys.”
  • Someone might complain, “The pesky telemarketers keep calling during dinner time.”

16. Infuriating

This word is used to describe something that causes intense anger or irritation.

  • For example, “It’s infuriating when people talk loudly on their phones in public.”
  • A person might say, “The slow internet connection is infuriating.”
  • Another might express, “It’s infuriating how the traffic never seems to improve.”

17. Maddening

This term is used to describe something that is extremely frustrating or exasperating.

  • For instance, “The constant noise from the construction site is maddening.”
  • A person might say, “It’s maddening when someone keeps interrupting you.”
  • Another might express, “The never-ending paperwork is maddening.”

18. Galling

This word is used to describe something that is irritating or provoking a strong reaction.

  • For example, “The constant interruptions are galling.”
  • A person might say, “It’s galling when people don’t respect your boundaries.”
  • Another might express, “The unfair treatment is galling.”

19. Exasperating

This term is used to describe something that is intensely frustrating or annoying.

  • For instance, “The constant delays are exasperating.”
  • A person might say, “It’s exasperating when someone doesn’t listen to you.”
  • Another might express, “The never-ending problems are exasperating.”

20. Challenging

This word is used to describe something that requires effort or skill to overcome or accomplish.

  • For example, “The complex puzzle is challenging.”
  • A person might say, “It’s challenging to learn a new language.”
  • Another might express, “The tight deadline is challenging to meet.”

21. Thorny

This term is used to describe a situation or problem that is complicated or hard to deal with. It can also refer to a person who is difficult to work with or understand.

  • For example, “The negotiations between the two countries have become thorny.”
  • Someone might say, “Dealing with my boss has always been thorny.”
  • In a discussion about a complex issue, a person might comment, “It’s a thorny problem that requires careful consideration.”

22. Knotty

This word is used to describe a problem or situation that is complex, intricate, or difficult to solve or understand. It can also refer to a person who is hard to deal with or understand.

  • For instance, “The company is facing a knotty issue with their finances.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been trying to solve this knotty math problem for hours.”
  • In a discussion about a challenging puzzle, someone might comment, “It’s a knotty riddle that requires creative thinking.”

23. Headache

This term is used to describe a situation or problem that is frustrating, annoying, or difficult to deal with. It can also refer to a person who causes trouble or annoyance.

  • For example, “Dealing with all these paperwork is such a headache.”
  • Someone might say, “My neighbor’s loud parties are a constant headache.”
  • In a discussion about a challenging project, a person might comment, “Managing multiple deadlines can be a real headache.”

24. Pain

This word is used to describe a situation or problem that is frustrating, irritating, or hard to deal with. It can also refer to a person who causes trouble or annoyance.

  • For instance, “Fixing this broken computer is such a pain.”
  • A person might say, “Dealing with traffic every day is a pain.”
  • In a discussion about a challenging task, someone might comment, “Writing this report is a real pain.”

25. Thorn in my side

This phrase is used to describe a person or situation that is a persistent source of annoyance or trouble. It implies that the issue is ongoing and difficult to resolve.

  • For example, “My noisy neighbors are a constant thorn in my side.”
  • Someone might say, “Dealing with bureaucracy at work is always a thorn in my side.”
  • In a discussion about a troublesome relationship, a person might comment, “Her constant criticism is a thorn in my side.”

26. Aggravation

Aggravation refers to a feeling of irritation or frustration caused by a situation or person. It is often used to describe an ongoing source of annoyance.

  • For example, “Dealing with constant traffic jams is such an aggravation.”
  • A person might say, “His constant interruptions are causing me a lot of aggravation.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult project, someone might express, “The lack of clear instructions is causing a lot of aggravation for the team.”

27. Irritant

An irritant is something or someone that causes annoyance or frustration. It is often used to describe a minor inconvenience or source of trouble.

  • For instance, “Mosquitoes are such irritants when you’re trying to enjoy a picnic.”
  • A person might say, “The constant beeping of the car alarm is an irritant to the entire neighborhood.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult coworker, someone might say, “He’s always late to meetings, and it’s such an irritant.”

28. Bother

To bother means to cause annoyance or trouble to someone. It is often used to describe a situation or person that is causing inconvenience or irritation.

  • For example, “Could you please turn down the music? It’s starting to bother me.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t want to bother you, but could you lend me some money?”
  • In a discussion about a persistent problem, someone might express, “The constant noise from the construction site is really bothering me.”

29. Hassle

Hassle refers to a situation or experience that involves difficulty, inconvenience, or frustration. It is often used to describe a bothersome or annoying task or process.

  • For instance, “Dealing with customer service can be such a hassle.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t want to hassle you, but could you help me move this heavy furniture?”
  • In a conversation about a complicated travel itinerary, someone might express, “Booking multiple flights can be a real hassle.”

30. Burden

A burden is something that causes difficulty, hardship, or inconvenience. It is often used to describe a heavy responsibility or source of trouble.

  • For example, “Taking care of an elderly parent can be a significant burden.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t want to be a burden, but could you pick me up from the airport?”
  • In a discussion about financial struggles, someone might express, “The burden of student loan debt is weighing heavily on me.”

31. Plague

Refers to something or someone that causes annoyance, trouble, or distress.

  • For example, “The constant construction noise is a plague on my peaceful neighborhood.”
  • In a discussion about pests, someone might say, “Mosquitoes are a real plague during the summer months.”
  • A person frustrated with their computer might exclaim, “This virus is a plague on my laptop!”

32. Thorn in the flesh

This phrase is used to describe a person or situation that is a constant source of irritation or trouble.

  • For instance, “My noisy neighbors are a thorn in the flesh.”
  • In a conversation about difficult coworkers, someone might say, “That guy in accounting is a real thorn in the flesh.”
  • A person dealing with a recurring issue might complain, “This leaky faucet is a thorn in the flesh!”

33. Agony

Refers to extreme physical or emotional pain and suffering.

  • For example, “The loss of a loved one can cause immense agony.”
  • In a discussion about injuries, someone might say, “Breaking a bone is pure agony.”
  • A person going through a difficult breakup might describe their feelings as, “I’m in agony over the end of the relationship.”

34. Menace

Describes something or someone that poses a potential danger or harm.

  • For instance, “The aggressive dog is a menace to the neighborhood.”
  • In a conversation about safety, someone might say, “Reckless drivers are a menace on the roads.”
  • A person concerned about cybersecurity might warn, “Online hackers are a real menace to personal information.”

35. Trouble

Refers to a situation or person that causes difficulty, inconvenience, or distress.

  • For example, “I’m having trouble understanding this math problem.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “We’ve been having trouble communicating lately.”
  • A person experiencing financial difficulties might say, “I’m in trouble with my bills.”

36. Inconvenience

This word refers to something that causes trouble or difficulty. It can describe situations or actions that are bothersome or inconvenient.

  • For example, “Running out of gas on my way to work was such an inconvenience.”
  • A person might say, “It’s an inconvenience having to wait in long lines at the grocery store.”
  • Another might complain, “The construction noise outside my apartment is such an inconvenience.”

37. Pestilent

This term describes something or someone that is annoying or troublesome. It can refer to a person, situation, or thing that causes inconvenience or irritation.

  • For instance, “My neighbor’s barking dog is a pestilent annoyance.”
  • A person might say, “The constant spam emails are a pestilent nuisance.”
  • Another might complain, “This slow internet connection is so pestilent.”

38. Painful

This word describes something that is causing physical or emotional pain. It can refer to situations or experiences that are difficult, distressing, or bothersome.

  • For example, “Getting a tattoo can be a painful experience.”
  • A person might say, “Dealing with a breakup can be emotionally painful.”
  • Another might complain, “This headache is so painful.”

39. Annoyance

This term refers to something or someone that causes annoyance or irritation. It can describe situations, actions, or people that are bothersome, frustrating, or troublesome.

  • For instance, “The constant buzzing of the fly is such an annoyance.”
  • A person might say, “His constant interruptions during the meeting are a major irritation.”
  • Another might complain, “The slow traffic is such an annoyance.”

40. Thorn

This word is used to describe something or someone that is causing trouble or annoyance. It can refer to situations, actions, or people that are bothersome, irritating, or troublesome.

  • For example, “Dealing with a difficult customer can be a real thorn.”
  • A person might say, “The constant noise from the construction site is a pain in the neck.”
  • Another might complain, “This broken chair is such a thorn.”

41. Vexation

Vexation refers to a feeling of annoyance or frustration caused by something or someone.

  • For example, “His constant interruptions were a source of vexation during the meeting.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t stand the vexation of dealing with traffic every day.”
  • Another might complain, “The never-ending construction noise is causing me great vexation.”

42. Obstacle

Obstacle refers to something that stands in the way of progress or success, making a task more difficult to accomplish.

  • For instance, “Lack of funding was a major obstacle in starting the business.”
  • A person might say, “I need to overcome the obstacle of my fear of public speaking.”
  • Another might discuss, “The language barrier was a significant obstacle during my travels.”

43. Discomfort

Discomfort refers to a feeling of physical or emotional unease or discomfort.

  • For example, “Sitting in an uncomfortable chair for hours caused great discomfort.”
  • A person might say, “I experienced discomfort after eating something that didn’t agree with me.”
  • Another might complain, “The hot weather is causing me a lot of discomfort.”

44. Quandary

Quandary refers to a state of uncertainty or perplexity, often when faced with a difficult choice or decision.

  • For instance, “I was in a quandary about whether to accept the job offer or stay at my current job.”
  • A person might say, “I find myself in a quandary regarding which college to attend.”
  • Another might discuss, “The ethical dilemma presented a real quandary for the team.”

45. Predicament

Predicament refers to a difficult or challenging situation that is often unexpected or problematic.

  • For example, “He found himself in a predicament when he realized he had lost his wallet.”
  • A person might say, “I’m in a real predicament with this deadline approaching.”
  • Another might discuss, “Getting caught in the rain without an umbrella put me in a predicament.”

46. Dilemma

A dilemma refers to a difficult choice or situation where a person has to choose between two or more equally unfavorable options. It can also refer to a situation where a person is faced with a problem that has no easy solution.

  • For example, “I’m in a dilemma – should I accept the job offer with a higher salary but longer hours, or stick with my current job?”
  • In a discussion about ethical issues, someone might say, “The decision to prioritize profit over environmental sustainability is a dilemma.”
  • A person might express their frustration by saying, “I’m in a dilemma – should I go to my friend’s birthday party or study for my final exams?”

47. Conundrum

A conundrum refers to a puzzling problem or question that is difficult to solve or understand. It can also refer to a situation that is confusing or perplexing.

  • For instance, “The mystery surrounding the disappearance of the plane remains a conundrum.”
  • In a discussion about philosophy, someone might ask, “What is the meaning of life? It’s a conundrum.”
  • A person might express their frustration by saying, “I’m faced with a conundrum – should I pursue my passion or choose a more stable career?”

48. Snag

A snag refers to an unexpected problem or obstacle that causes a delay or complication in a plan or process. It can also refer to a minor difficulty or inconvenience.

  • For example, “We hit a snag in our travel plans when our flight got canceled.”
  • In a discussion about home improvement, someone might say, “We encountered a snag when we realized the wall wasn’t properly insulated.”
  • A person might express their annoyance by saying, “I hit a snag – my car won’t start and I’m already late for work.”

49. Hitch

A hitch refers to an unexpected problem or delay that disrupts a plan or process. It can also refer to a temporary difficulty or obstacle.

  • For instance, “We encountered a hitch when the equipment malfunctioned during the presentation.”
  • In a discussion about event planning, someone might say, “We had a few hitches along the way, but the wedding turned out beautifully.”
  • A person might express their frustration by saying, “I’m experiencing a hitch – my computer crashed and I lost all my work.”

50. Jam

Jam refers to a difficult or challenging situation that is often unexpected and requires quick thinking or problem-solving skills to resolve. It can also refer to a tight or uncomfortable situation.

  • For example, “I’m in a jam – I locked my keys in the car and I’m already late for an important meeting.”
  • In a discussion about traffic, someone might say, “I got stuck in a jam on the highway and it took me hours to get home.”
  • A person might express their frustration by saying, “I’m in a jam – I have two deadlines to meet and not enough time to finish both tasks.”

51. Bind

This slang term refers to a difficult or challenging situation that someone finds themselves in.

  • For example, “I’m in a bind because I have two conflicting commitments.”
  • A person might say, “I got myself in a bind by forgetting to pay my bills on time.”
  • Someone might ask for help with a bind by saying, “Can you lend me some money? I’m in a bind and need to pay my rent.”

52. Sticky wicket

This slang term is derived from the game of cricket and refers to a difficult or tricky situation.

  • For instance, “I found myself in a sticky wicket when I realized I had lost my wallet.”
  • A person might say, “Getting out of debt can be a sticky wicket.”
  • Someone might describe a complicated problem as a sticky wicket by saying, “Figuring out the best solution to this issue is a real sticky wicket.”

53. Tight spot

This slang term is used to describe a difficult or challenging situation that someone is in.

  • For example, “I’m in a tight spot because I need to finish this project by tomorrow.”
  • A person might say, “I found myself in a tight spot when I realized I had forgotten my keys.”
  • Someone might ask for help in a tight spot by saying, “Can you lend me a hand? I’m in a tight spot and need some assistance.”

54. Pickle

This slang term refers to being in a difficult or troublesome situation.

  • For instance, “I’m in a pickle because I accidentally deleted an important file.”
  • A person might say, “I got myself into a pickle by forgetting my friend’s birthday.”
  • Someone might describe a challenging problem as a pickle by saying, “Finding a solution to this issue is going to be a real pickle.”

55. Hot water

This slang term is used to describe being in a troublesome or difficult situation.

  • For example, “I found myself in hot water when I was caught cheating on the test.”
  • A person might say, “I’m in hot water with my boss because I missed an important deadline.”
  • Someone might describe a problematic situation as hot water by saying, “Getting out of this mess is going to be a real challenge.”

56. Deep water

This slang refers to being in trouble or a difficult situation. It can also imply being involved in something risky or dangerous.

  • For example, “I’m in deep water with my boss for missing the deadline.”
  • Someone might say, “Don’t get yourself in deep water by getting involved in that shady business.”
  • A person might warn, “Stay away from him, he’s always in deep water.”

57. Troublemaker

This term refers to someone who frequently causes difficulties or problems. It can be used to describe a person who is mischievous or always stirring up trouble.

  • For instance, “He’s such a troublemaker, always starting fights.”
  • A teacher might say, “I need to keep an eye on the troublemakers in the class.”
  • A parent might scold their child, “Stop being a troublemaker and listen to me.”

58. Agitator

An agitator is someone who intentionally stirs up trouble or unrest, often for political or social purposes. It can also refer to a person who provokes others to anger or action.

  • For example, “He’s known as an agitator at protests, always trying to incite violence.”
  • A journalist might write, “The agitators in the crowd were arrested for starting a riot.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t pay attention to him, he’s just an agitator trying to get a reaction.”

59. Rabble-rouser

A rabble-rouser is someone who incites or leads others to cause trouble or engage in disruptive behavior. This term is often used to describe a person who encourages a crowd to become unruly or violent.

  • For instance, “The politician was accused of being a rabble-rouser, riling up the crowd with his inflammatory speeches.”
  • A witness might say, “The rabble-rouser in the crowd started throwing punches, causing chaos.”
  • A journalist might write, “The rally turned violent due to the actions of a few rabble-rousers.”

60. Provocateur

A provocateur is a person who deliberately provokes or agitates others, often for the purpose of causing a reaction or creating conflict. This term is commonly used to describe someone who engages in provocative or controversial behavior.

  • For example, “The artist is known for being a provocateur, creating controversial artwork to challenge societal norms.”
  • A commentator might say, “He’s just a provocateur seeking attention by making outrageous statements.”
  • A person might warn, “Don’t let him get under your skin, he’s just a provocateur trying to provoke a reaction.”

61. Mischief-maker

This term refers to someone who enjoys causing trouble or mischief. A mischief-maker often engages in pranks, practical jokes, or other disruptive behavior.

  • For example, a teacher might scold a student by saying, “Stop acting like a mischief-maker and pay attention in class.”
  • In a group of friends, one might playfully say, “You’re always the mischief-maker, coming up with crazy ideas.”
  • A parent might warn their child, “Don’t hang out with that mischief-maker, they’ll only get you into trouble.”

62. Rascal

A rascal is someone who is mischievous or playful in a slightly naughty or troublesome way. It can also be used to describe someone who is clever or cunning.

  • For instance, a parent might affectionately say to their child, “You little rascal, always finding ways to get into trouble.”
  • In a lighthearted conversation, one person might tease another by saying, “You’re such a rascal, always coming up with funny pranks.”
  • A friend might describe someone they know as a rascal, saying, “He’s a bit of a rascal, always getting away with things.”

63. Agitating

Agitating refers to someone or something that causes annoyance or irritation. It can also imply that the person or thing is intentionally causing trouble or provoking others.

  • For example, a person might say, “Stop being so agitating, you’re making everyone upset.”
  • In a heated argument, one person might accuse the other of being intentionally agitating, saying, “You’re just trying to agitate me and make me lose my temper.”
  • A coworker might complain about an agitating colleague, saying, “They always find a way to make our work environment stressful.”

64. Disagreeable

Disagreeable refers to someone who is difficult to deal with or unpleasant in nature. It can describe a person’s behavior or attitude that causes trouble or makes situations uncomfortable.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He’s always so disagreeable, never willing to compromise.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might describe an argumentative person as disagreeable, saying, “They always have to make every conversation difficult.”
  • A customer might complain about a disagreeable salesperson, saying, “They were rude and made my shopping experience really unpleasant.”

65. Annoying

Annoying refers to someone or something that causes irritation or frustration. It can describe behavior, actions, or characteristics that are bothersome or unpleasant.

  • For example, a person might say, “Stop being so annoying, you’re driving everyone crazy.”
  • In a conversation about pet peeves, one person might mention a specific annoying habit, saying, “One thing that really annoys me is when people chew loudly.”
  • A friend might complain about an annoying coworker, saying, “They always interrupt and never listen to anyone else’s ideas.”

66. Bothering

This term refers to something or someone that is causing irritation or inconvenience. It is often used to describe a situation or action that is bothersome or troublesome.

  • For example, “Stop bothering me with your constant questions.”
  • A person might say, “I find it really bothering when people chew loudly.”
  • In a complaint about a coworker, someone might say, “He’s always bothering me with his unnecessary comments.”
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