Top 35 Slang For Understand – Meaning & Usage

Understanding slang can be a daunting task, especially when new words and phrases seem to pop up overnight. But fear not, because we’ve got you covered. In this listicle, we’ve rounded up the top slang words and phrases for understand that will help you stay in the loop and communicate like a pro. So, get ready to expand your vocabulary and impress your friends with your newfound slang knowledge!

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1. Get it

To understand or grasp a concept or idea. “Get it” is a colloquial expression used to indicate that someone understands something.

  • For example, if someone explains a complicated math problem, you might respond, “Ah, now I get it!”
  • In a conversation about a complex movie plot, someone might say, “I watched it twice before I finally got it.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Do you get it? Should I explain it again?”

2. Catch on

To understand or grasp a concept or idea. “Catch on” is a phrase used to indicate that someone has understood something, often after some initial confusion or hesitation.

  • For instance, if someone explains a joke and you finally understand it, you might say, “Oh, I finally caught on!”
  • In a discussion about a new technology, someone might say, “It took a while, but I finally caught on to how it works.”
  • A teacher might encourage a struggling student, “Keep trying, you’ll catch on eventually.”

3. Dig

To understand or appreciate something on a deeper level. “Dig” is a slang term that implies a more profound understanding or enjoyment of a subject or concept.

  • For example, if someone explains the symbolism in a novel, you might respond, “I dig it, that adds a whole new layer to the story.”
  • In a conversation about a complex art piece, someone might say, “I really dig the artist’s use of color and texture.”
  • A music enthusiast might say, “I dig the lyrics of this song, they really resonate with me.”

4. Grok

To fully understand or internalize something, often on an intuitive or instinctive level. “Grok” is a term coined by science fiction author Robert A. Heinlein in his novel Stranger in a Strange Land.

  • For instance, if someone explains a complex scientific theory and you completely understand it, you might say, “I grok it, thanks for explaining.”
  • In a discussion about a philosophical concept, someone might say, “It took me a while, but I finally grok the meaning of life.”
  • A programmer might say, “I grok this programming language, it just clicks with me.”

5. Wrap your head around

To fully understand or grasp a concept or idea, often one that is complex or difficult to comprehend. “Wrap your head around” is a colloquial expression that emphasizes the effort or mental process required to understand something.

  • For example, if someone explains a complicated scientific theory, you might say, “It’s hard to wrap my head around, but I think I get it.”
  • In a conversation about a complex mathematical equation, someone might say, “I’m still trying to wrap my head around the concept.”
  • A teacher might encourage a student, “Keep working on it, eventually you’ll be able to wrap your head around it.”

6. Figure out

When faced with a difficult puzzle, you might say, “I need to figure out the solution.”

  • If someone is explaining a complex concept, you might ask, “Can you help me figure out what you mean?”
  • When trying to understand someone’s motives, you might say, “I can’t quite figure out why they did that.”

7. Grasp

When learning a new concept, you might say, “I’m starting to grasp the basics.”

  • If someone is explaining a difficult concept, you might ask, “Can you break it down further? I’m having trouble grasping it.”
  • When discussing a complicated plot twist in a movie, you might say, “It took me a while to grasp what was happening.”

8. Comprehend

When reading a complex book, you might say, “It takes time to comprehend the author’s message.”

  • If someone is explaining a scientific theory, you might ask, “Can you simplify it? I’m having trouble comprehending it.”
  • When discussing a philosophical concept, you might say, “It’s difficult to comprehend the depth of this idea.”

9. Get the gist

When summarizing a long article, you might say, “I’ll give you the gist of it.”

  • If someone is explaining a complicated process, you might ask, “Can you give me the gist? I don’t need all the details.”
  • When discussing a movie plot, you might say, “I didn’t catch all the details, but I got the gist of what was happening.”

10. Click

When learning a new skill, you might say, “It finally clicked for me.”

  • If someone is explaining a difficult concept, you might say, “Wait, it just clicked. I understand now.”
  • When discussing a complex problem, you might say, “I had to think about it for a while, but it eventually clicked.”

11. Follow

To understand or grasp the meaning or concept of something. “Follow” is often used as a slang term to indicate understanding.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m not sure what you’re saying, can you explain it again?” and another person might respond, “Yeah, I follow you now.”
  • In a conversation about a complex topic, one person might ask, “Do you follow what I’m saying?” to check if the other person understands.
  • A teacher might say to their students, “Make sure you’re following along with the lesson.”

12. See eye to eye

To have the same opinion or viewpoint as someone else. “See eye to eye” is a slang phrase used to indicate agreement.

  • For instance, two friends might be discussing a movie and one might say, “I loved it!” and the other might respond, “Me too, we really see eye to eye on this.”
  • In a heated debate, someone might try to find common ground by saying, “Let’s see if we can find something we agree on and start from there.”
  • A manager might encourage their team members to work together by saying, “We need to see eye to eye on this project in order to succeed.”

13. Catch the drift

To grasp or comprehend the general meaning or concept of something. “Catch the drift” is a slang phrase often used to check if someone understands the main point.

  • For example, one person might be explaining a joke and ask, “Do you catch the drift?” to see if the other person understands the punchline.
  • In a conversation about a complicated plan, one person might say, “I explained it once, but let me know if you’re not catching the drift.”
  • A teacher might explain a difficult concept and then ask their students, “Does everyone catch the drift or should I explain it again?”

14. Get the picture

To understand or grasp the situation or circumstances. “Get the picture” is a slang phrase often used to confirm understanding.

  • For instance, someone might be explaining a problem and ask, “Do you get the picture?” to check if the other person understands the situation.
  • In a conversation about a complex task, one person might say, “Let’s break it down step by step until you get the picture.”
  • A coach might explain a game plan and then ask their team, “Does everyone get the picture or should we go over it again?”

15. Get the hang of

To become skilled or proficient at something. “Get the hang of” is a slang phrase used to indicate understanding and improvement over time.

  • For example, someone might be learning a new dance move and say, “It’s difficult at first, but I’m starting to get the hang of it.”
  • In a training session, an instructor might say, “Keep practicing and you’ll get the hang of it.”
  • A mentor might advise their mentee, “Don’t worry if it seems overwhelming at first, you’ll get the hang of it with practice.”

16. Wrap your mind around

This phrase means to fully understand or grasp a concept or idea. It implies that the concept or idea may be complex or difficult to understand.

  • For example, “It took me a while to wrap my mind around the concept of quantum physics.”
  • In a discussion about a complicated problem, someone might say, “I’m still trying to wrap my mind around the solution.”
  • A teacher might say to a student, “You need to wrap your mind around the concept of algebra before moving on to advanced math.”

17. Get the point

This phrase means to understand the main idea or message being conveyed. It implies that there is a specific point or key takeaway that the listener or reader should understand.

  • For instance, “After explaining the rules, the coach asked the team if they got the point.”
  • In a debate, one person might say, “I don’t think you’re getting the point I’m trying to make.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Do you get the point of this lesson?”

18. Get the message

This phrase means to understand the intended meaning or communication of a message. It implies that there is a specific message being conveyed and the listener or reader should understand it.

  • For example, “The boss looked at me sternly, and I got the message that I needed to work harder.”
  • In a text conversation, one person might say, “I’m not sure if they’re being sarcastic or serious. Did you get the message?”
  • A parent might say to a child, “When I give you a warning, I expect you to get the message and change your behavior.”

19. Get the drift

This phrase means to understand the general idea or meaning of something. It implies that there is an underlying concept or direction that the listener or reader should understand.

  • For instance, “The professor explained the theory in detail, but I still didn’t get the drift of it.”
  • In a conversation about a movie plot, someone might say, “I didn’t fully understand the ending, but I got the drift.”
  • A friend might explain a joke and then ask, “Do you get the drift now?”

20. Get the idea

This phrase means to understand the concept or notion being discussed. It implies that there is a specific idea or concept that the listener or reader should understand.

  • For example, “I explained the plan to my team, and they quickly got the idea.”
  • In a brainstorming session, one person might say, “Let me draw a diagram to help you get the idea.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Do you get the idea behind this math problem?”

21. Get the lowdown

This phrase means to obtain or gather all the necessary details or information about a particular situation or topic. It is often used when someone wants to be fully informed or up-to-date about something.

  • For example, “Before the meeting, make sure to get the lowdown on the new project.”
  • When discussing a recent event, someone might ask, “Did you get the lowdown on what happened?”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity scandal, a person might say, “I need to get the lowdown on all the juicy details.”

22. Get the scoop

This phrase means to obtain the most recent or up-to-date information about something, especially when it is exclusive or interesting. It is often used when someone wants to know the latest news or details about a particular topic.

  • For instance, “I need to get the scoop on the new restaurant opening in town.”
  • When discussing a breaking news story, someone might say, “Let’s tune in to the news to get the scoop.”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity’s personal life, a person might ask, “Have you heard anything? I want to get the scoop.”

23. Get the vibe

This phrase means to understand or perceive the overall atmosphere, feeling, or mood of a particular situation, place, or group of people. It is often used when someone wants to gauge the general impression or energy of a situation.

  • For example, “I can’t quite get the vibe of this party. Is it casual or formal?”
  • When discussing a new workplace, someone might ask, “Have you been able to get the vibe of the office?”
  • In a conversation about a music festival, a person might say, “I love going to concerts to get the vibe of the crowd.”

24. Get the concept

This phrase means to comprehend or grasp the fundamental idea, concept, or principle behind something. It is often used when someone wants to ensure they have a clear understanding of a particular topic or subject.

  • For instance, “I need to read that chapter again to get the concept.”
  • When discussing a complex scientific theory, someone might ask, “Can you help me get the concept behind this equation?”
  • In a conversation about a new technology, a person might say, “I’m still trying to get the concept of how it works.”

25. Get the memo

This phrase means to be informed or aware of important information or a specific message that has been communicated. It is often used when someone wants to ensure that others are aware of a particular piece of information.

  • For example, “I don’t think he got the memo about the meeting being rescheduled.”
  • When discussing a policy change, someone might ask, “Did everyone get the memo about the new dress code?”
  • In a conversation about a company announcement, a person might say, “I hope everyone got the memo about the upcoming event.”

26. Fathom

To fathom something means to fully understand or comprehend it. It is often used when trying to understand complex or abstract concepts.

  • For example, “I can’t fathom why he would make such a decision.”
  • In a discussion about a complicated scientific theory, one might say, “It took me a while to fathom the concept, but now it makes sense.”
  • A person might express their confusion by saying, “I just can’t fathom how she managed to do that.”

27. Grasp the concept

To grasp the concept means to understand or comprehend an idea or concept, often by mentally “grabbing” or “holding” onto it.

  • For instance, “It took me a while to grasp the concept of quantum physics.”
  • In a classroom setting, a teacher might ask, “Do you all grasp the concept I just explained?”
  • A person might say, “Once I grasped the concept, everything else fell into place.”

28. Get a handle on

To get a handle on something means to understand or gain control over it. The term “handle” refers to being able to hold or control something.

  • For example, “I need to get a handle on this new software before I can use it effectively.”
  • In a discussion about a complex problem, someone might say, “We need to get a handle on the root cause before we can find a solution.”
  • A person might express their frustration by saying, “I just can’t seem to get a handle on this math concept.”

29. Be in the know

To be in the know means to be knowledgeable or informed about something. It implies being part of a select group that has access to certain information.

  • For instance, “She’s always in the know about the latest fashion trends.”
  • In a conversation about upcoming events, someone might ask, “Are you in the know about the party this weekend?”
  • A person might say, “I like to be in the know when it comes to current events.”

30. Pick up on

To pick up on something means to quickly understand or notice it, often without explicit explanation.

  • For example, “She was able to pick up on the subtle cues that he was lying.”
  • In a classroom setting, a student might say, “I picked up on the teacher’s hints and knew what the answer was.”
  • A person might express their surprise by saying, “I didn’t expect him to pick up on the hidden message so quickly.”

31. See what you mean

This phrase is used to show that you understand and agree with what someone is saying. It implies that you comprehend their perspective or opinion.

  • For example, if someone explains a complicated concept to you, you might respond with, “Ah, now I see what you mean.”
  • In a conversation about a confusing situation, you might say, “I can see what you mean about the conflicting information.”
  • If someone shares their personal experience, you might respond with, “I see what you mean. That must have been difficult.”

32. Make sense

This phrase is used to indicate that something is logical or understandable. It implies that the information or situation is clear and coherent.

  • For instance, if someone explains a complex theory, you might say, “That really makes sense now.”
  • In a discussion about a decision, you might comment, “It makes sense to prioritize safety in this case.”
  • If someone shares a surprising fact, you might respond with, “Wow, that really makes sense when you think about it.”

33. Read between the lines

This phrase is used to suggest that there is a deeper or hidden meaning behind someone’s words or actions. It implies the need to interpret and understand the underlying message.

  • For example, if someone makes a vague statement, you might say, “I think we need to read between the lines here.”
  • In a conversation about a subtle hint, you might comment, “I’m trying to read between the lines and figure out what they’re really saying.”
  • If someone gives you a cryptic message, you might respond with, “I’ll have to read between the lines to understand what you’re getting at.”

34. Connect the dots

This phrase is used to describe the process of identifying connections or relationships between different pieces of information or events. It implies the need to analyze and piece together the available data.

  • For instance, if someone presents you with scattered information, you might say, “Let’s connect the dots and see if we can find a pattern.”
  • In a discussion about a complex problem, you might comment, “We need to connect the dots to understand the root cause.”
  • If someone shares bits of information, you might respond with, “I’ll connect the dots and see if I can figure out the whole story.”

35. Piece it together

This phrase is used to describe the process of gathering and organizing information to create a comprehensive understanding. It implies the need to put together various pieces to form a coherent whole.

  • For example, if someone gives you fragments of a story, you might say, “Let’s piece it together and see what we can come up with.”
  • In a conversation about a complex issue, you might comment, “We need to piece together all the available information to get a complete picture.”
  • If someone shares puzzle pieces of a mystery, you might respond with, “I’ll piece it together and see if I can solve the puzzle.”
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