Top 50 Slang For Unease – Meaning & Usage

Feeling a bit uneasy or on edge? We’ve got you covered with a curated list of slang terms that perfectly capture that sense of discomfort. From subtle expressions to quirky phrases, our team has gathered the latest and most relatable words to help you navigate those moments of unease with a touch of humor and understanding. Let’s dive in and unravel the language of unease together!

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1. Jitters

Jitters refer to a feeling of nervousness or unease, often accompanied by trembling or shaking. It is commonly used to describe pre-performance nerves or anxiety before a big event.

  • For example, “I always get the jitters before a job interview.”
  • Someone might say, “She had the jitters before her first solo performance.”
  • In a discussion about stage fright, a person might comment, “The jitters can be overwhelming, but they usually disappear once you start performing.”

2. Creeps

Creeps describe a feeling of discomfort or unease, often caused by someone’s behavior or presence. It can refer to a person who gives off a strange or unsettling vibe.

  • For instance, “That guy gives me the creeps. I don’t trust him.”
  • A person might say, “I had the creeps walking alone in that dark alley.”
  • In a conversation about encountering an odd individual, someone might mention, “I got the creeps when he stared at me without blinking.”

3. Heebee-jeebees

Heebee-jeebees is a slang term used to describe a state of extreme unease or discomfort. It often implies a feeling of being spooked or unsettled.

  • For example, “Being alone in a creepy old house gives me the heebee-jeebees.”
  • A person might say, “I got the heebee-jeebees when I heard strange noises coming from the basement.”
  • In a discussion about horror movies, someone might comment, “That scene gave me the heebee-jeebees. It was so intense!”

4. Willies

Willies refer to an unpleasant sensation of unease or discomfort. It is often used to describe a feeling of being creeped out or having a sense of foreboding.

  • For instance, “That haunted house gave me the willies. I couldn’t wait to leave.”
  • A person might say, “I always get the willies when I walk alone at night.”
  • In a conversation about encountering something eerie, someone might mention, “The way that doll stared at me gave me the willies.”

5. Shivers

Shivers describe a physical reaction to unease or fear, often characterized by a tingling sensation or goosebumps. It can also refer to a feeling of extreme discomfort or unease.

  • For example, “The horror movie gave me shivers down my spine.”
  • A person might say, “I felt shivers all over when I heard the ghost story.”
  • In a discussion about encountering something eerie, someone might comment, “Just thinking about it gives me the shivers.”

6. Goosebumps

This refers to the bumps that appear on one’s skin as a reaction to cold, fear, or excitement. The term “goosebumps” is often used to describe a physical sensation of unease or discomfort.

  • For example, “The horror movie gave me goosebumps.”
  • A person might say, “I felt goosebumps when I heard the eerie music.”
  • Another might exclaim, “That story gave me goosebumps!”

7. Twitchy

This term describes a state of unease or nervousness, often characterized by involuntary muscle movements or a constant feeling of restlessness.

  • For instance, “He was feeling twitchy before his big presentation.”
  • A person might say, “I get twitchy when I’m in crowded places.”
  • Another might comment, “The suspense was making me feel twitchy.”

8. Edgy

This term describes a feeling of unease or nervousness, often characterized by a sense of being on the edge or close to losing control.

  • For example, “He’s been acting edgy lately, I wonder what’s bothering him.”
  • A person might say, “I always feel edgy before a job interview.”
  • Another might comment, “The tense atmosphere made everyone edgy.”

9. Uneasy

This term describes a state of discomfort or unease, often characterized by a sense of uneasiness or apprehension.

  • For instance, “She felt uneasy walking alone at night.”
  • A person might say, “I have an uneasy feeling about this situation.”
  • Another might comment, “The sudden change in plans made everyone feel uneasy.”

10. Nervy

This term describes a state of unease or nervousness, often characterized by a feeling of being on edge or easily startled.

  • For example, “He’s been acting nervy since the accident.”
  • A person might say, “I always get nervy before a big test.”
  • Another might comment, “The loud noises made me feel nervy.”

11. Anxious

Feeling or showing unease, apprehension, or worry. “Anxious” is often used to describe a state of heightened nervousness or anticipation.

  • For example, a student might say, “I’m anxious about taking the final exam.”
  • A person waiting for an important phone call might feel, “Anxious to hear the news.”
  • Someone with social anxiety might feel, “Anxious about attending a crowded party.”

12. Fidgety

Unable to keep still or quiet, often due to nervousness or unease. “Fidgety” is commonly used to describe someone who constantly moves or fidgets.

  • For instance, a child might be described as “fidgety” during a long car ride.
  • A person waiting for an important interview might become “fidgety” in the waiting room.
  • Someone feeling anxious might exhibit “fidgety” behavior,“fidgety” behavior, like tapping their foot or playing with their hair.
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13. Shaky

Having a slight and rapid movement, usually due to nervousness or weakness. “Shaky” is often used to describe physical symptoms of unease or anxiety.

  • For example, someone might say, “I feel shaky after drinking too much coffee.”
  • A person experiencing stage fright might have “shaky” hands.
  • Someone feeling nervous before a presentation might have a “shaky” voice.

14. Unsettled

Feeling uncertain or disturbed, often due to a lack of stability or security. “Unsettled” is commonly used to describe a state of unease or discomfort.

  • For instance, a person might feel “unsettled” after a scary movie.
  • A traveler in a foreign country might feel “unsettled” by unfamiliar surroundings.
  • Someone going through a major life change might feel “unsettled” as they adjust to the new situation.

15. Queasy

Feeling sick to the stomach, often accompanied by a sensation of unease or discomfort. “Queasy” is frequently used to describe a feeling of mild nausea or general uneasiness.

  • For example, someone might say, “I feel queasy after eating too much junk food.”
  • A person prone to motion sickness might feel “queasy” during a bumpy car ride.
  • Someone experiencing anxiety might have a “queasy” stomach as a physical manifestation of their unease.

16. Panicky

When someone is panicky, they are experiencing a heightened sense of fear or anxiety. It often manifests as a sense of urgency or an inability to think clearly in a stressful situation.

  • For example, during a disaster, someone might say, “Don’t panic! Stay calm and follow the evacuation procedures.”
  • If someone is feeling overwhelmed and anxious, they might say, “I’m starting to feel panicky about this upcoming deadline.”
  • A person might describe their reaction to a scary movie by saying, “I got panicky during the intense scenes.”

17. Wary

When someone is wary, they are cautious or suspicious of potential dangers or problems. It often involves being alert and taking precautions to avoid negative outcomes.

  • For instance, if someone receives a suspicious email, they might say, “I’m wary of clicking on any links in this email.”
  • When walking alone at night, a person might be wary of their surroundings and take extra precautions for their safety.
  • If someone has been scammed before, they might be wary of trusting others easily.

18. Disquiet

Disquiet refers to a feeling of unease or anxiety. It often involves a sense of restlessness or discomfort caused by something unsettling or disturbing.

  • For example, a person might say, “There’s a sense of disquiet in the air before a storm.”
  • If someone is worried about an upcoming event, they might say, “I can’t shake this feeling of disquiet.”
  • A person might describe their reaction to a mysterious noise by saying, “It filled me with a sense of disquiet.”

19. Restless

When someone is restless, they are unable to relax or find calmness. It often involves a sense of agitation or a constant need to move or do something.

  • For instance, if someone is unable to sleep and keeps tossing and turning, they might say, “I feel so restless.”
  • When waiting for important news, a person might feel restless and find it difficult to focus on other tasks.
  • If someone is feeling bored and antsy, they might say, “I need to do something to shake off this restlessness.”

20. Unnerved

When someone is unnerved, they are feeling disturbed, unsettled, or shaken. It often involves a sense of unease or discomfort caused by something unexpected or unsettling.

  • For example, if someone witnesses a car accident, they might say, “The sound of the crash unnerved me.”
  • When watching a horror movie, a person might feel unnerved by the suspense and jump scares.
  • If someone receives a threatening message, they might say, “It really unnerved me to read those words.”

21. Antsy

Antsy is a term used to describe a feeling of restlessness or unease. It often implies a sense of impatience or a desire to be active or move around.

  • For example, “I’ve been sitting in this waiting room for hours and I’m starting to get antsy.”
  • A person might say, “I always get antsy before a big presentation.”
  • Another might comment, “The kids were getting antsy during the long car ride.”

22. Skittish

Skittish refers to a state of being nervous or jumpy, often due to fear or unease. It suggests a tendency to startle easily or be cautious in unfamiliar situations.

  • For instance, “The dog is skittish around strangers.”
  • A person might say, “I feel skittish walking alone at night.”
  • Another might comment, “The horse became skittish when it heard a loud noise.”

23. Nervous wreck

A nervous wreck is someone who is extremely anxious or worried, often to the point of being unable to function normally. It implies a high level of unease and emotional distress.

  • For example, “I was a nervous wreck before my job interview.”
  • A person might say, “She’s a nervous wreck every time she has to speak in public.”
  • Another might comment, “The stress of the exam turned him into a nervous wreck.”

24. Shifty

Shifty is a term used to describe someone who appears suspicious or untrustworthy. It suggests a sense of unease or discomfort in the presence of that person.

  • For instance, “I don’t trust him, he has a shifty look in his eyes.”
  • A person might say, “The salesman seemed shifty, so I didn’t buy anything from him.”
  • Another might comment, “The shifty behavior of the suspect caught the attention of the police.”

25. On edge

Being on edge means feeling nervous or tense, often due to a specific situation or anticipation of something unpleasant. It implies a state of heightened unease or sensitivity.

  • For example, “I’ve been on edge ever since I heard about the break-in.”
  • A person might say, “The constant noise in the apartment next door has put me on edge.”
  • Another might comment, “The team was on edge before the championship game.”

26. Freaked out

This term describes a state of extreme fear or anxiety. It can be used to express being overwhelmed or terrified.

  • For example, “I was completely freaked out when I saw a spider crawling on my arm.”
  • Someone might say, “I got freaked out when I heard a loud noise in the middle of the night.”
  • Another person might exclaim, “I’m so freaked out about the upcoming exam, I can’t sleep!”

27. Paranoid

This term describes a state of excessive suspicion or fear, often without valid reason. It can be used to express feeling constantly on edge or expecting the worst.

  • For instance, “I feel paranoid that someone is watching me.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m always paranoid that I left the stove on when I leave the house.”
  • Another person might admit, “I know it’s irrational, but I’m paranoid about germs and constantly wash my hands.”

28. Spooked

This term describes a state of being startled or frightened, often by something unexpected or eerie. It can be used to express feeling uneasy or jumpy.

  • For example, “I got spooked when I heard a strange noise in the dark.”
  • Someone might say, “The horror movie really spooked me and gave me nightmares.”
  • Another person might share, “I always feel spooked when I walk alone at night.”

29. Awkward

This term describes a situation or feeling that is uncomfortable, embarrassing, or socially awkward. It can be used to express discomfort or unease in social interactions.

  • For instance, “The conversation became awkward after an unintentional insult.”
  • Someone might say, “I feel awkward when I’m the only one not laughing at a joke.”
  • Another person might admit, “I find it awkward to make small talk with strangers.”

30. Tense

This term describes a state of nervousness or anxiety. It can be used to express feeling on edge or stressed.

  • For example, “I felt tense before the job interview.”
  • Someone might say, “The tense atmosphere in the room made it difficult to relax.”
  • Another person might share, “I get tense when I have to speak in public.”

31. Wobbly

This term is used to describe a feeling of unease or nervousness. It can also refer to physical unsteadiness or shakiness.

  • For example, “I get a bit wobbly before public speaking.”
  • Someone experiencing unease might say, “I feel a bit wobbly about this decision.”
  • A person describing their physical state might say, “My legs feel wobbly after that intense workout.”

32. Hinky

This slang term is used to describe something or someone that seems suspicious or makes one feel uneasy.

  • For instance, “There’s something hinky about that guy.”
  • A person might say, “I’m getting a hinky feeling about this situation.”
  • Someone describing a strange occurrence might say, “Things have been really hinky around here lately.”

33. Shook

This slang term describes a state of being emotionally disturbed or unsettled, often due to a shocking or surprising event.

  • For example, “I was shook when I found out I got the job.”
  • Someone might say, “That movie left me feeling shook.”
  • A person describing their reaction to a scary experience might say, “I was completely shook after that haunted house.”

34. Hesitant

This term describes a feeling of uncertainty or reluctance. It is often used to express unease or caution about a decision or action.

  • For instance, “She was hesitant to try the new food.”
  • A person might say, “I’m hesitant to invest in that company.”
  • Someone describing their feelings about a job offer might say, “I’m feeling hesitant about accepting the position.”

35. Uncomfortable

This term describes a state of feeling uneasy or awkward in a particular situation or environment.

  • For example, “I felt uncomfortable at the party because I didn’t know anyone.”
  • A person might say, “I’m uncomfortable discussing personal matters with strangers.”
  • Someone describing a tense atmosphere might say, “The room was filled with uncomfortable silence.”

36. Frazzled

When someone is frazzled, they are feeling extremely stressed or overwhelmed. It can be used to describe a person or a situation.

  • For example, “I have so much work to do, I’m feeling really frazzled.”
  • Another example, “The chaotic traffic made me feel frazzled and anxious.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t handle any more stress, I’m already frazzled.”

37. Jumpy

Jumpy is used to describe someone who is nervous or easily startled. It can also refer to a situation that makes someone feel on edge.

  • For instance, “I’m feeling jumpy after watching that horror movie.”
  • Another example, “The loud noise made me jump, I’m feeling really jumpy.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m always jumpy when I’m alone in a dark alley.”

38. Creeped out

When someone is creeped out, they are feeling uneasy or uncomfortable. It is often used to describe a feeling of being disturbed or frightened.

  • For example, “That abandoned house gives me the creeps, I feel so creeped out.”
  • Another example, “I don’t like the way that person keeps staring at me, it’s making me feel creeped out.”
  • Someone might say, “The eerie music in that movie really creeped me out.”

39. Heebie-jeebies

Heebie-jeebies is a slang term used to describe a feeling of unease or nervousness. It is often used to describe a creepy or unsettling situation.

  • For instance, “That horror movie gave me the heebie-jeebies.”
  • Another example, “I get the heebie-jeebies whenever I have to walk through a dark alley.”
  • Someone might say, “The thought of spiders gives me the heebie-jeebies.”

40. Disquieted

Disquieted is a more formal term used to describe a feeling of unease or disturbance. It can be used to describe a person’s emotional state or a situation that causes discomfort.

  • For example, “The unsettling news left me feeling disquieted.”
  • Another example, “The eerie silence in the haunted house made me feel disquieted.”
  • Someone might say, “The disquieted atmosphere at the crime scene was palpable.”

41. Shivery

When someone is shivery, they may experience chills or shudders due to fear or discomfort.

  • For example, “I felt shivery walking alone in the dark.”
  • A person might say, “The horror movie gave me the shivers.”
  • Another might describe their unease as, “I had a shivery feeling that something bad was about to happen.”

42. Shaken

When someone is shaken, they are deeply affected or disturbed by something, often a traumatic event or shocking news.

  • For instance, “I was shaken after witnessing the car accident.”
  • A person might say, “The news of the tragedy left me feeling shaken.”
  • Another might describe their emotional state as, “I’m still shaken by what happened.”

43. Rattled

When someone is rattled, they feel uneasy, nervous, or anxious, often due to a surprising or unsettling event.

  • For example, “The loud noise rattled me.”
  • A person might say, “I was rattled by the unexpected turn of events.”
  • Another might describe their anxiety as, “I’m feeling a bit rattled about the upcoming presentation.”

44. Shudder

When someone shudders, their body involuntarily trembles or shakes, often in response to fear, disgust, or discomfort.

  • For instance, “The creepy scene in the movie made me shudder.”
  • A person might say, “The thought of spiders gives me shudders.”
  • Another might describe their reaction as, “I couldn’t help but shudder at the sight of the decaying food.”

45. Quivery

When someone is quivery, they have a sensation of trembling or shaking, often due to nervousness or unease.

  • For example, “Her voice sounded quivery as she spoke.”
  • A person might say, “I felt quivery before going on stage.”
  • Another might describe their physical state as, “My hands were quivery with anticipation.”

46. Trembly

This word is used to describe a feeling of unease or nervousness, often accompanied by trembling or shaking. It can be used to convey a physical or emotional state of discomfort.

  • For example, “I felt so trembly before my big presentation.”
  • A person might say, “The news made me trembly with anxiety.”
  • Another might describe a scary experience by saying, “I was so trembly, I could barely move.”

47. Unnerving

This term is used to describe something that causes a feeling of unease or discomfort. It suggests that the subject is unsettling or disconcerting.

  • For instance, “The horror movie was so unnerving, I had nightmares.”
  • A person might say, “I find the sound of nails on a chalkboard unnerving.”
  • Another might describe a creepy encounter by saying, “The way he stared at me was really unnerving.”

48. Jangled

This word is used to describe a state of unease or nervousness, often characterized by a feeling of being on edge or frazzled. It can also refer to a sense of mental or emotional disarray.

  • For example, “The loud noises jangled my nerves and made me feel jangled.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling jangled all day, I can’t seem to relax.”
  • Another might describe a chaotic situation by saying, “The crowded room made me feel jangled.”

49. Ruffled

This term is used to describe a state of unease or agitation, often characterized by feeling unsettled or disturbed. It can also refer to a physical appearance that is disheveled or disarrayed.

  • For instance, “The argument left me feeling ruffled and upset.”
  • A person might say, “The constant noise outside my window has me feeling ruffled.”
  • Another might describe a messy room by saying, “Everything is so ruffled, I can’t find anything.”

50. Wigged out

This slang phrase is used to describe a state of extreme unease or anxiety, often accompanied by a feeling of being overwhelmed or panicked. It suggests a strong reaction to a stressful or unsettling situation.

  • For example, “I totally wigged out when I saw the spider.”
  • A person might say, “The haunted house really wigged me out.”
  • Another might describe a scary movie by saying, “It was so intense, it totally wigged me out.”