Top 60 Slang For Unfairly – Meaning & Usage

Feeling like you’ve been done dirty? Whether it’s at work, school, or just in everyday life, unfair situations can leave us feeling frustrated and powerless. But fear not, our team has curated a list of the top slang terms for “unfairly” that will have you nodding in agreement and ready to take on any unjust circumstances that come your way. Don’t miss out on this enlightening compilation that will have you feeling empowered and in-the-know!

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1. Screwed over

When someone is “screwed over,” it means they have been unfairly treated or taken advantage of. This phrase implies that the person has been deceived or betrayed by someone else.

  • For example, “I can’t believe my boss screwed me over by giving the promotion to someone less qualified.”
  • In a relationship, one person might say, “I feel like my partner screwed me over by lying to me.”
  • A friend might vent, “I lent him money and he never paid me back. I got screwed over.”

2. Ripped off

To be “ripped off” means to be deceived or swindled out of something, usually money. This slang phrase implies that the person has been cheated or taken advantage of.

  • For instance, “I bought this product online and it turned out to be a fake. I got ripped off.”
  • If someone pays a high price for a low-quality item, they might say, “I feel like I got ripped off.”
  • A person might warn others, “Be careful when shopping in that store, they’re known for ripping people off.”

3. Shafted

When someone is “shafted,” it means they have been unfairly treated or put at a disadvantage. This slang term suggests that the person has been treated poorly or neglected.

  • For example, “I worked hard on the project, but my colleague took all the credit. I got shafted.”
  • In a sports context, a player might say, “I got shafted by the referee’s bad call.”
  • A person might complain, “I always get shafted when it comes to promotions at work.”

4. Screwed

To be “screwed” means to be in a bad situation or predicament, usually as a result of unfair circumstances. This slang term suggests that the person is facing difficulties or challenges.

  • For instance, “I missed the last bus and now I’m screwed. I’ll have to walk home.”
  • If someone is caught in a lie, they might say, “I’m screwed now, everyone knows the truth.”
  • A student might say, “I didn’t study for the exam. I’m really screwed.”

5. Done dirty

When someone is “done dirty,” it means they have been mistreated or taken advantage of in an unfair or disrespectful manner. This slang phrase implies that the person has been treated poorly or unfairly.

  • For example, “My friend promised to help me move, but he bailed on me. I feel like he did me dirty.”
  • If someone spreads rumors about another person, they might say, “They really did her dirty.”
  • A person might vent, “I trusted them and they stabbed me in the back. I can’t believe they did me dirty.”

6. Cheated

To be cheated means to be deceived or tricked in a way that is unfair or dishonest. It can refer to being cheated out of money, a prize, or an opportunity.

  • For example, “I feel cheated because the game was rigged in their favor.”
  • A person might say, “He cheated me out of my rightful inheritance.”
  • In a relationship, someone might say, “I discovered that my partner cheated on me.”

7. Gypped

To be gypped means to be swindled or scammed out of something that is rightfully yours. The term is derived from the word “Gypsy” and can be considered offensive, so it’s important to use with caution.

  • For instance, “I feel gypped because I paid full price for a defective product.”
  • A person might say, “I got gypped by a shady salesman who promised me a great deal.”
  • In a discussion about unfair business practices, someone might say, “Consumers are often gypped by misleading advertisements.”

8. Shortchanged

To be shortchanged means to be given less than what is deserved or expected. It can refer to receiving less money, time, or resources than one should have received.

  • For example, “I feel shortchanged because I worked overtime but didn’t get paid for it.”
  • A person might say, “The restaurant shortchanged me on my portion size.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “I always feel shortchanged because my partner never puts in as much effort as I do.”

9. Robbed

To be robbed means to have something stolen from you or to be taken advantage of in a way that is unfair or unjust. It can refer to being robbed of money, possessions, or opportunities.

  • For instance, “I feel robbed because someone broke into my house and stole my valuables.”
  • A person might say, “I was robbed by a pickpocket while traveling in a crowded area.”
  • In a discussion about unfair treatment, someone might say, “Employees are often robbed of their rights and benefits by unscrupulous employers.”

10. Jipped

To be jipped means to be deprived or swindled out of something that is rightfully yours. It is a variation of the term “gypped” and carries a similar meaning. However, it is important to note that the term “jipped” is considered offensive and should be used with caution.

  • For example, “I feel jipped because I paid for a full service but only received half.”
  • A person might say, “I got jipped by a dishonest contractor who didn’t complete the job.”
  • In a conversation about unfair transactions, someone might say, “Customers are often jipped by false advertising and hidden fees.”

11. Hoodwinked

To be hoodwinked means to be fooled or deceived by someone in a cunning or crafty way. It implies that the person being hoodwinked was tricked without realizing it.

  • For example, “He thought he was getting a great deal, but he was actually being hoodwinked into buying a counterfeit product.”
  • In a discussion about scams, someone might say, “Don’t fall for those emails, they’re just trying to hoodwink you out of your money.”
  • A person sharing a personal story might say, “I was hoodwinked by a smooth-talking salesperson into signing a contract I didn’t fully understand.”

12. Bamboozled

To be bamboozled means to be tricked or deceived in a confusing or perplexing way. It implies that the person being bamboozled was left feeling bewildered or fooled.

  • For instance, “She was bamboozled by the magician’s sleight of hand and couldn’t figure out how he made the coin disappear.”
  • In a conversation about a complicated scam, someone might say, “The con artist’s elaborate scheme left dozens of people bamboozled and out of their money.”
  • A person recounting a funny incident might say, “I tried to follow the directions, but I ended up completely bamboozled and lost.”

13. Fleeced

To be fleeced means to be cheated or swindled out of money or possessions. It implies that the person being fleeced was taken advantage of or exploited for personal gain.

  • For example, “He was fleeced by a smooth-talking scammer who convinced him to invest in a fake business.”
  • In a discussion about financial scams, someone might say, “The Ponzi scheme left thousands of investors completely fleeced and devastated.”
  • A person sharing a cautionary tale might say, “Be careful when buying online, I got fleeced and never received the product I paid for.”

14. Conned

To be conned means to be deceived or tricked through deception or persuasion. It implies that the person being conned was manipulated or persuaded by someone with ulterior motives.

  • For instance, “She was conned into giving her personal information over the phone by someone pretending to be from her bank.”
  • In a conversation about scams, someone might say, “The con artist conned unsuspecting victims into giving him their life savings.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I was conned into buying a worthless product by a smooth-talking salesperson.”

15. Grifted

To be grifted means to be swindled or cheated through a dishonest scheme or plan. It implies that the person being grifted was deceived or manipulated for personal gain.

  • For example, “He was grifted by a group of scammers who convinced him to invest in a fake business venture.”
  • In a discussion about fraud, someone might say, “The unsuspecting victims were grifted out of their life savings by a well-organized criminal network.”
  • A person recounting a story might say, “I was grifted by a smooth-talking con artist who convinced me to give him my credit card information.”

16. Snookered

This term is often used to describe a situation where someone is outwitted or manipulated.

  • For example, “I thought I had a good deal, but I was snookered into paying more than it was worth.”
  • In a game of pool, one player might say, “I got snookered when my opponent set up a difficult shot for me.”
  • A person might complain, “I feel snookered by the fine print in this contract.”

17. Hornswoggled

This term refers to being tricked or cheated in a deceitful manner.

  • For instance, “I can’t believe I fell for that scam. I feel completely hornswoggled.”
  • In a discussion about scams, someone might say, “Don’t get hornswoggled by online offers that seem too good to be true.”
  • A person might warn others, “Be careful who you trust, or you might end up hornswoggled.”

18. Sandbagged

This term is often used to describe a situation where someone is caught off guard or taken advantage of.

  • For example, “I thought we were working together, but he sandbagged me by stealing my ideas.”
  • In a sports context, a player might say, “I got sandbagged when my opponent suddenly started playing much better.”
  • A person might complain, “I feel sandbagged by my coworkers who took credit for my hard work.”

19. Jobbed

This term refers to being treated unfairly or manipulated in a way that is disadvantageous.

  • For instance, “I got jobbed out of a promotion because of office politics.”
  • In a discussion about unfair treatment, someone might say, “I feel like I’m always getting jobbed by my boss.”
  • A person might express frustration, “I can’t believe I got jobbed again by the system.”

20. Bilked

This term is often used to describe being cheated or tricked out of money or resources.

  • For example, “I invested in a fraudulent scheme and ended up getting bilked out of my life savings.”
  • In a discussion about scams, someone might say, “Watch out for online sellers who try to bilk you out of your money.”
  • A person might warn others, “Don’t be naive or you’ll end up getting bilked by con artists.”

21. Finessed

To be finessed means to be taken advantage of or deceived in a clever and skillful manner. It is often used when someone feels they have been tricked or manipulated in a way that was not fair or honest.

  • For example, “I thought I was getting a great deal on that car, but I got finessed by the salesman.”
  • Someone might say, “He finessed his way into getting that promotion.”
  • In a game, a player might say, “I got finessed by my opponent’s strategy.”

22. Double-crossed

To be double-crossed means to be betrayed or deceived by someone, especially someone you trusted. It implies that the person intentionally went against your trust or loyalty.

  • For instance, “I can’t believe she double-crossed me and told my secret.”
  • A person might say, “I thought we were friends, but he double-crossed me and stole my idea.”
  • In a movie, a character might say, “I was double-crossed by my partner, who turned out to be working for the enemy.”

23. Misled

To be misled means to be given false or inaccurate information that leads to a misunderstanding or incorrect belief. It suggests that someone intentionally provided misleading information.

  • For example, “I was misled by the advertisement and bought a product that didn’t work as promised.”
  • A person might say, “The politician misled the public with his false promises.”
  • In a court case, a lawyer might argue, “The witness was misled by the defendant’s false alibi.”

24. Deprived

To be deprived means to be unfairly denied of something essential or necessary. It implies that someone or something has taken away or withheld something that you should have had.

  • For instance, “I feel deprived of sleep because my neighbors are always loud.”
  • A person might say, “Growing up poor, I was deprived of many opportunities.”
  • In a discussion about education, someone might argue, “Children from low-income families are often deprived of quality education.”

25. Deceived

To be deceived means to be tricked or misled into believing something that is not true. It suggests that someone intentionally led you to believe a false or misleading statement.

  • For example, “I was deceived by the online advertisement and bought a counterfeit product.”
  • A person might say, “He deceived me into thinking he was someone he wasn’t.”
  • In a magic trick, a magician might say, “Prepare to be deceived as I make this card disappear.”

26. Swindled

This term refers to being deceived or tricked out of something, typically money or valuables. It implies that someone has used dishonest or fraudulent means to gain an unfair advantage.

  • For example, “He was swindled out of his life savings by a smooth-talking con artist.”
  • In a discussion about scams, someone might say, “Don’t fall for that online scheme, you’ll end up getting swindled.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I got swindled when I bought a fake designer handbag from a street vendor.”

27. Victimized

To be victimized means to be made a victim of unfair treatment, usually by someone or something more powerful or influential. It implies being taken advantage of or suffering harm unjustly.

  • For instance, “She felt victimized by her boss’s constant criticism and unfair demands.”
  • In a conversation about bullying, someone might say, “No one should have to endure being victimized by their peers.”
  • A person discussing discrimination might say, “Minority groups often feel victimized by systemic inequalities and prejudice.”

28. Exploited

To be exploited means to be used or taken advantage of for someone else’s benefit, often in an unfair or unethical way. It implies being used as a means to an end without regard for one’s well-being.

  • For example, “The workers felt exploited by their employer who paid them below minimum wage.”
  • In a discussion about labor rights, someone might say, “Workers should not be exploited for their labor.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I felt exploited when my ideas were stolen and someone else took credit for them.”

29. Misused

To be misused means to be treated or utilized in a way that goes against its intended purpose or in a way that causes harm or damage. It implies being used improperly or unfairly.

  • For instance, “The funds were misused by the organization’s corrupt officials.”
  • In a conversation about technology, someone might say, “Social media platforms can be misused to spread misinformation and manipulate public opinion.”
  • A person discussing power dynamics might say, “Authority should never be misused to oppress or control others.”

30. Abused

To be abused means to be treated in a harmful, cruel, or unfair manner, often by someone in a position of power or authority. It implies being subjected to physical, emotional, or psychological harm.

  • For example, “She endured years of domestic abuse at the hands of her partner.”
  • In a discussion about animal welfare, someone might say, “Animals should never be abused for entertainment or experimentation.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I was emotionally abused by my former boss, who constantly belittled and demeaned me.”

31. Unjustly

This term refers to actions or situations that are done or experienced in a way that is not fair or just.

  • For example, “He was unjustly accused of a crime he did not commit.”
  • In a discussion about a court case, someone might argue, “The defendant was unjustly treated by the legal system.”
  • A person might say, “She was unjustly passed over for a promotion at work.”

32. Unethically

This word describes actions or behaviors that are done in a way that is not ethical or morally acceptable.

  • For instance, “The company acted unethically by exploiting its workers.”
  • In a conversation about business practices, someone might say, “It is important to avoid acting unethically to maintain a good reputation.”
  • A person might argue, “Unethically obtained evidence should not be admissible in court.”

33. Unscrupulously

This term refers to actions or behaviors that are done without regard for moral or ethical standards.

  • For example, “He unscrupulously manipulated others to get what he wanted.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “Some politicians unscrupulously make promises they have no intention of keeping.”
  • A person might warn, “Beware of unscrupulous individuals who will take advantage of your trust.”

34. Unjustifiably

This word describes actions or decisions that are made without sufficient reason or justification.

  • For instance, “She was unjustifiably fired from her job.”
  • In a conversation about punishment, someone might argue, “The punishment was unjustifiably harsh for such a minor offense.”
  • A person might say, “He unjustifiably accused her of stealing without any evidence.”

35. Inequitably

This term refers to actions or situations that are done or experienced in a way that is not fair or equal.

  • For example, “The distribution of resources was done inequitably, favoring certain groups.”
  • In a discussion about income inequality, someone might say, “The current tax system operates inequitably, benefiting the wealthy.”
  • A person might argue, “The educational system treats students from different backgrounds inequitably.”

36. Unrightfully

This term refers to something that is done or happening in an unfair or unjust manner. It implies that the action or situation does not align with what is right or just.

  • For example, “He was unrightfully accused of the crime and spent years in prison before being exonerated.”
  • In a discussion about legal cases, someone might say, “The court’s decision was unrightfully biased towards the wealthy.”
  • A person expressing frustration with a situation might say, “I’ve been unrightfully treated by my boss for years.”

37. Played

This slang term is used to describe a situation where someone has been deceived or taken advantage of in an unfair way. It implies that the person has been manipulated or tricked for someone else’s gain.

  • For instance, “He played me by pretending to be my friend, only to steal my money.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “She played him by leading him on and then breaking his heart.”
  • A person expressing disappointment might say, “I feel played by the company for promising promotions that never materialized.”

38. Chiseled

This term is used to describe being cheated or deceived in a way that involves manipulation or trickery. It implies that the person has been taken advantage of through cunning or deceitful tactics.

  • For example, “He chiseled me out of my money by selling me a fake product.”
  • In a discussion about scams, someone might say, “Many people have been chiseled out of their life savings by fraudulent investment schemes.”
  • A person expressing frustration might say, “I feel chiseled by the insurance company for denying my claim without valid reasons.”

39. Cozened

This slang term refers to being deceived or tricked by someone in an unfair or dishonest manner. It implies that the person has been manipulated or fooled for someone else’s benefit.

  • For instance, “She cozened me into signing a contract that was not in my favor.”
  • In a conversation about con artists, someone might say, “Many people have been cozened into giving away their personal information through phishing scams.”
  • A person expressing anger might say, “I can’t believe I was cozened by my own family member for financial gain.”

40. Skewed

This term is used to describe a situation or information that is presented in a way that is unfair or biased. It implies that the perspective or presentation is distorted or influenced to favor a particular outcome or viewpoint.

  • For example, “The media coverage of the event was skewed towards a specific political agenda.”
  • In a discussion about statistics, someone might say, “The study’s results were skewed due to a small sample size.”
  • A person expressing dissatisfaction might say, “The company’s performance evaluation process is heavily skewed towards favoring certain employees.”

41. Backstabbed

To be backstabbed means to be betrayed or deceived by someone you trust. It refers to someone who pretends to be your friend but then turns against you in a harmful or unfair way.

  • For example, “I thought we were best friends, but she backstabbed me by spreading rumors about me.”
  • In a discussion about trust issues, someone might say, “I’ve been backstabbed before, so I have a hard time trusting people.”
  • A person might warn others, “Be careful who you confide in, or you might end up getting backstabbed.”

42. Double-dealt

To be double-dealt means to be deceived or tricked by someone who is acting dishonestly. It refers to someone who pretends to be on your side but is secretly working against you.

  • For instance, “I can’t believe he double-dealt me by pretending to support my idea and then stealing it for himself.”
  • In a discussion about trustworthiness, someone might say, “I’ve been double-dealt before, so I always approach new relationships with caution.”
  • A person might advise others, “Watch out for those who double-deal; they can’t be trusted.”

43. Suckered

To be suckered means to be fooled or tricked by someone into doing something or believing something that is not true. It refers to being easily deceived or manipulated.

  • For example, “I got suckered into buying a product that turned out to be a scam.”
  • In a discussion about gullibility, someone might say, “I used to get suckered all the time, but now I’m more skeptical.”
  • A person might warn others, “Don’t be suckered by promises that sound too good to be true.”

44. Stabbed in the back

To be stabbed in the back means to be betrayed or let down by someone you trust. It refers to someone who turns against you or acts in a way that is harmful or unfair.

  • For instance, “I can’t believe she stabbed me in the back by spreading rumors about me.”
  • In a discussion about trust issues, someone might say, “I’ve been stabbed in the back before, so it’s hard for me to trust people.”
  • A person might caution others, “Be careful who you trust, or you might end up being stabbed in the back.”

45. Jerked around

To be jerked around means to be manipulated or treated unfairly by someone who is playing with your emotions or taking advantage of you. It refers to being toyed with or led on.

  • For example, “I felt like he was jerking me around by constantly canceling plans at the last minute.”
  • In a discussion about toxic relationships, someone might say, “I finally realized he was just jerking me around and I deserved better.”
  • A person might advise others, “Don’t let anyone jerk you around; know your worth and stand up for yourself.”

46. Screwed the pooch

This phrase is used to describe someone who has made a major mistake or error, often resulting in negative consequences. It can also be used to express frustration or disappointment.

  • For example, “I really screwed the pooch on that project. It’s going to take a lot of work to fix it.”
  • Another usage could be, “He really screwed the pooch by missing that important deadline.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t believe I screwed the pooch and forgot my passport. Now I can’t go on my trip.”

47. Jived

This term is used to describe someone who has been deceived or misled, often in a playful or lighthearted manner. It can also be used to express disbelief or skepticism.

  • For instance, “Don’t believe him, he’s just jiving you.”
  • Another usage could be, “I thought she was telling the truth, but it turns out she was just jiving me.”
  • Someone might say, “You’re jiving, right? That can’t be true!”

48. Jerked

This word is used to describe someone who has been treated unfairly or harshly, often in a sudden or unexpected manner. It can also be used to express frustration or anger.

  • For example, “I can’t believe they jerked me around like that. It’s not fair.”
  • Another usage could be, “He felt jerked by his boss when he was passed over for a promotion.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m so tired of being jerked around by this company. I deserve better treatment.”

49. Gamed

This term is used to describe someone who has been manipulated or cheated, often in a calculated or strategic manner. It can also be used to express suspicion or distrust.

  • For instance, “I think they gamed the system to win that competition.”
  • Another usage could be, “She felt like she was being gamed by her partner in the business deal.”
  • Someone might say, “I don’t trust him. I think he’s trying to game us.”

50. Pwned

This term is used to describe someone who has been defeated or humiliated, often in a video game or online setting. It originated from a misspelling of the word “owned” and is now commonly used in gaming culture.

  • For example, “I got totally pwned in that last round. I need to step up my game.”
  • Another usage could be, “He thought he was a great player, but he got pwned by a beginner.”
  • Someone might say, “I pwned that boss level. It was a satisfying victory.”

51. Clowned

To be clowned means to be made a fool of or humiliated in a public or embarrassing way. It is often used when someone is tricked, mocked, or ridiculed.

  • For example, “He thought he was being clever, but he ended up getting clowned by his friends.”
  • In a situation where someone is embarrassed, a bystander might say, “She got clowned pretty hard.”
  • When someone is teased or mocked, they might say, “Don’t clown me like that!”

52. Dogged

To be dogged means to be treated unfairly or harshly, often without reason or justification. It can also imply being persistently pursued or harassed.

  • For instance, “He was dogged by the media for weeks after the scandal.”
  • In a situation where someone is constantly criticized, a person might say, “They really dogged him for his mistakes.”
  • When someone is being persistently pursued, they might say, “I feel like I’m being dogged by bad luck lately.”

53. Punked

To be punked means to be tricked or deceived, usually in a humiliating or embarrassing way. It is often used when someone falls for a prank or is made to look foolish.

  • For example, “They punked him by pretending to be a celebrity and asking for a selfie.”
  • In a situation where someone is fooled, a person might say, “You got punked! That was a fake lottery ticket.”
  • When someone is made to look foolish, they might say, “I can’t believe I got punked like that!”

54. Hosed

To be hosed means to be cheated or deceived, usually in a way that results in a significant loss or disadvantage. It is often used when someone feels they have been taken advantage of or swindled.

  • For instance, “He got hosed by that shady contractor who never finished the job.”
  • In a situation where someone is cheated, a person might say, “They really hosed her with that unfair contract.”
  • When someone feels they have been taken advantage of, they might say, “I got hosed by that used car salesman.”

55. Shanked

To be shanked means to be betrayed or stabbed in the back, often by someone close or trusted. It is often used when someone feels they have been double-crossed or deceived.

  • For example, “He got shanked by his best friend, who stole his idea and claimed it as their own.”
  • In a situation where someone is betrayed, a person might say, “I can’t believe she shanked me like that after all we’ve been through.”
  • When someone feels they have been deceived, they might say, “I trusted him, but he shanked me when I least expected it.”

56. Snaked

To be snaked means to be betrayed or deceived by someone. It refers to the act of being tricked or double-crossed in a dishonest or unfair manner.

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57. Faked out

To be faked out means to be deceived or tricked into believing something that is not true. It refers to the act of being fooled or misled in a situation.

58. Shammed

To be shammed means to be deceived or tricked by someone. It refers to the act of being fooled or misled in a dishonest or unfair manner.

59. Juked

To be juked means to be outmaneuvered or tricked by someone, especially in a sports context. It refers to the act of dodging or evading someone’s movements in order to gain an advantage.

60. Gaffled

To be gaffled means to be robbed or stolen from. It refers to the act of having one’s belongings or possessions taken away in an unfair or dishonest manner.