Top 35 Slang For Unhealthy – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to discussing unhealthy habits or behaviors, using the right slang can make all the difference. We’ve put together a list of the top slang terms that are commonly used to describe unhealthy practices, from food choices to lifestyle habits. Stay in the loop and learn how to talk about these topics in a way that’s both informative and engaging. Get ready to expand your vocabulary and stay ahead of the curve with our latest compilation!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Junk food

Junk food refers to food that is high in calories, low in nutrients, and often high in sugar, fat, and salt. It is typically processed and packaged for convenience and has little to no nutritional value.

  • For example, “I’m craving some junk food like potato chips and candy.”
  • A person might say, “I need to cut back on junk food and start eating healthier.”
  • In a discussion about diet, someone might mention, “Junk food is a major contributor to obesity and other health problems.”

2. Greasy

Greasy is a term used to describe food that is high in fat or oil. It often refers to fried foods that have a shiny, oily appearance and texture.

  • For instance, “I love eating greasy pizza and french fries.”
  • Someone might complain, “I feel so gross after eating all that greasy fast food.”
  • In a conversation about cooking, a person might say, “I try to avoid using too much oil to keep my meals from becoming greasy.”

3. Fatty

Fatty describes food that is high in fat content. It often refers to foods that are greasy, oily, or have a rich, creamy texture.

  • For example, “I can’t resist indulging in fatty foods like bacon and cheese.”
  • A person might say, “I need to cut down on fatty foods for the sake of my health.”
  • In a discussion about dieting, someone might mention, “Fatty foods can contribute to weight gain and heart disease.”

4. Sugary

Sugary describes food that is high in sugar content. It often refers to sweet treats and beverages that contain a significant amount of added sugar.

  • For instance, “I have a weakness for sugary snacks like cookies and ice cream.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m trying to reduce my intake of sugary drinks to improve my overall health.”
  • In a conversation about nutrition, a person might mention, “Sugary foods can lead to tooth decay and increase the risk of diabetes.”

5. Processed

Processed food refers to food that has undergone various mechanical or chemical processes to extend its shelf life or enhance its taste and texture. It often contains additives, preservatives, and high levels of salt, sugar, and unhealthy fats.

  • For example, “I try to avoid eating too much processed food and opt for fresh, whole foods instead.”
  • A person might say, “Processed foods are often high in sodium and can contribute to high blood pressure.”
  • In a discussion about healthy eating, someone might mention, “The best way to improve your diet is to reduce your intake of processed foods.”

6. Fast food

Fast food refers to food that is prepared and served quickly, often in a restaurant or through a drive-thru. It is typically high in calories, fat, sugar, and sodium, and lacks essential nutrients.

  • For example, “Let’s grab some fast food for dinner tonight.”
  • A person might say, “I try to avoid fast food because it’s not good for my health.”
  • In a discussion about dietary choices, someone might comment, “Fast food is convenient, but it’s important to balance it with healthier options.”

7. Deep-fried

Deep-fried refers to food that has been cooked by submerging it completely in hot oil. This cooking method gives food a crispy and golden exterior, but it also adds a significant amount of calories and unhealthy fats.

  • For instance, “I love deep-fried chicken.”
  • A person might say, “Deep-fried foods are delicious, but they should be enjoyed in moderation.”
  • In a conversation about unhealthy cooking techniques, someone might mention, “Deep-fried foods are often associated with an increased risk of heart disease.”

8. High-cal

High-cal is a slang term used to describe food or drinks that are high in calories. These items provide a large amount of energy, but consuming too many high-calorie foods can contribute to weight gain and other health issues.

  • For example, “That milkshake is really high-cal.”
  • A person might say, “I try to avoid high-calorie snacks.”
  • In a discussion about healthy eating, someone might comment, “It’s important to be mindful of high-calorie foods and choose nutritious options instead.”

9. Empty calories

Empty calories refer to foods and drinks that provide energy (calories) but little to no nutritional value. These foods are often high in added sugars, unhealthy fats, and refined grains.

  • For instance, “Soda is full of empty calories.”
  • A person might say, “I try to limit my intake of empty calorie foods.”
  • In a conversation about healthy eating habits, someone might mention, “Focusing on nutrient-dense foods instead of empty calories can improve overall health.”

10. Carb-loaded

Carb-loaded is a slang term used to describe foods that are high in carbohydrates. These foods, often made with refined grains or added sugars, can cause blood sugar spikes and may contribute to weight gain if consumed in excess.

  • For example, “That pasta dish is carb-loaded.”
  • A person might say, “I try to balance my carb intake with other nutrients.”
  • In a discussion about different diets, someone might comment, “Low-carb diets can be effective for weight loss, but it’s important to choose healthy carbs when consuming them.”

11. Trans fat

This term refers to a type of fat that is created through the process of hydrogenation, which solidifies liquid oils and increases the shelf life of food products. Trans fat is known for its negative impact on health, particularly in raising bad cholesterol levels and increasing the risk of heart disease.

  • For example, a nutritionist might advise, “Avoid foods that contain trans fat, such as fried and processed snacks.”
  • A health-conscious individual might read a food label and say, “I’m not buying this, it has trans fat.”
  • In a conversation about healthy eating, someone might say, “Cutting out trans fat was one of the best decisions I made for my well-being.”

12. High sodium

This term is used to describe foods that have a high amount of sodium, which is commonly found in table salt. Consuming excessive amounts of sodium can lead to health problems such as high blood pressure and increased risk of heart disease.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need to watch my sodium intake because I tend to eat a lot of high-sodium foods.”
  • In a restaurant, a customer might ask, “Can you make this dish with low sodium?”
  • Someone might warn a friend, “Be careful with that instant noodle soup, it’s a salt bomb.”

13. High cholesterol

This slang term is used to describe foods that are high in cholesterol, which is a waxy substance found in animal-based foods. High cholesterol levels can contribute to the development of heart disease and other health issues.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “Your high cholesterol levels indicate a need for dietary changes.”
  • A person discussing their eating habits might admit, “I love burgers, but I know they’re high in cholesterol.”
  • Someone might recommend a healthier alternative by saying, “Instead of eating fried chicken, try grilled chicken to avoid a cholesterol bomb.”

14. Artificial

This term is used to describe food products that contain synthetic or man-made ingredients, rather than being natural or organic. Artificial ingredients are often added to enhance flavor, color, or shelf life, but they may have negative health effects when consumed in excess.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I try to avoid foods with artificial sweeteners because they don’t taste natural.”
  • In a discussion about healthy eating, someone might argue, “Processed foods are full of artificial ingredients that are bad for our bodies.”
  • A nutritionist might advise, “Read the labels carefully to avoid products with artificial additives.”

15. High in preservatives

This term is used to describe foods that contain a high amount of preservatives, which are substances added to food to prolong its shelf life. While preservatives help prevent spoilage, consuming foods high in preservatives may have negative health effects in the long run.

  • For example, a person might say, “I prefer fresh fruits and vegetables over canned ones because they’re less likely to be high in preservatives.”
  • In a conversation about food quality, someone might comment, “Fast food is notorious for being chemical-laden and high in preservatives.”
  • A health-conscious individual might read a food label and say, “I avoid products that are high in preservatives because I want to eat clean.”

16. Death on a plate

This phrase is used to describe food that is extremely unhealthy and can have negative consequences for one’s health. It implies that consuming such food is equivalent to consuming something that could cause death.

  • For example, “That deep-fried burger with a side of cheese fries is a death on a plate.”
  • When talking about a particularly unhealthy meal, one might say, “I can’t believe I just ate that. It was a death on a plate.”
  • Someone might warn against eating certain foods by saying, “Stay away from fast food. It’s a death on a plate.”

17. Unhealthy indulgence

This phrase refers to the act of indulging in unhealthy foods or drinks in a way that is excessive and potentially harmful to one’s health. It implies that the person is giving in to their cravings without considering the negative consequences.

  • For instance, “I had a major unhealthy indulgence last night. I ate an entire pint of ice cream.”
  • When discussing guilty pleasures, someone might say, “Pizza is my ultimate unhealthy indulgence.”
  • A person might admit to their unhealthy eating habits by saying, “I know it’s bad for me, but I can’t resist the occasional unhealthy indulgence.”

18. Guilty pleasure food

This term refers to food that is typically considered to be unhealthy or indulgent, but is still enjoyed by an individual. It implies that the person feels a sense of guilt or shame for enjoying the food.

  • For example, “Chocolate cake is my guilty pleasure food. I can’t resist it.”
  • When discussing favorite foods, someone might say, “French fries are my ultimate guilty pleasure food.”
  • A person might confess their love for a particular food by saying, “I know it’s not good for me, but ice cream is my guilty pleasure food.”

19. Junked up

This phrase is used to describe food that is filled with unhealthy or low-quality ingredients. It implies that the food lacks nutritional value and is not beneficial for one’s health.

  • For instance, “That fast food burger is completely junked up with processed ingredients.”
  • When talking about a particularly unhealthy meal, one might say, “I can’t believe I just ate that. It was completely junked up.”
  • Someone might warn against eating certain foods by saying, “Avoid processed snacks. They’re usually junked up with artificial ingredients.”

20. Grease bomb

This term is used to describe a food that is high in unhealthy fats or oils, often resulting in a greasy texture. It implies that consuming such food can have negative effects on one’s health.

  • For example, “That deep-fried chicken is a grease bomb. It’s dripping with oil.”
  • When discussing unhealthy food choices, someone might say, “I try to avoid anything that’s a grease bomb.”
  • A person might complain about feeling sick after eating greasy food by saying, “I regret eating that burger. It was a total grease bomb.”

21. Deep-fried death

This term refers to food that has been deep-fried, which is often associated with being unhealthy and potentially harmful to one’s health.

  • For example, “I can’t resist ordering some deep-fried death at the fair.”
  • In a conversation about unhealthy eating habits, someone might say, “I know deep-fried death is bad for me, but it’s just so delicious.”
  • A person might warn their friend, “You should avoid deep-fried death if you’re trying to eat healthier.”

22. Candy coma

This phrase describes the feeling of extreme drowsiness or fatigue that can occur after consuming a large amount of sugary candy.

  • For instance, “I ate so much candy that I ended up in a candy coma.”
  • During Halloween, someone might joke, “Beware of the candy coma that follows a night of trick-or-treating.”
  • A person might say, “I always regret eating too much candy because it puts me in a sugar-induced coma.”

23. Cholesterol city

This term is used to describe a situation or food that is high in cholesterol, which can be detrimental to one’s health.

  • For example, “That cheeseburger with extra bacon is a one-way ticket to cholesterol city.”
  • In a discussion about heart health, someone might say, “I try to avoid foods that take me straight to cholesterol city.”
  • A person might caution their friend, “Be careful with that deep-fried food, you don’t want to end up in cholesterol city.”

24. Butter bomb

This phrase refers to a food that is loaded with butter or other high-fat ingredients, which can contribute to an unhealthy diet.

  • For instance, “That dish is a butter bomb waiting to clog your arteries.”
  • During a cooking show, a chef might say, “We’re going to make a delicious butter bomb of a dessert.”
  • A person might warn their friend, “You might want to avoid that butter bomb if you’re watching your weight.”

25. Sweet tooth overload

This term describes a situation where someone has an overwhelming desire for sweet foods, often leading to excessive consumption and potential health issues.

  • For example, “I have a serious sweet tooth overload after eating all those cookies.”
  • When discussing dessert preferences, someone might say, “I can’t resist anything chocolate. It’s my sweet tooth overload.”
  • A person might advise their friend, “Try to satisfy your sweet tooth overload with healthier options like fruit instead of sugary treats.”

26. Candy crush

This term refers to a strong addiction or obsession with candy or sweets. It is often used to describe someone who constantly craves and consumes sugary treats.

  • For example, “She has a serious candy crush. She can’t go a day without eating chocolate.”
  • A person might say, “I need to stay away from the candy aisle at the grocery store. It triggers my candy crush.”
  • Another might warn, “Watch out for those gummy bears. They’re my candy crush.”

27. Carb craving

This slang term describes a strong and intense desire for foods that are high in carbohydrates, such as bread, pasta, or potatoes. It often refers to a specific craving for comfort foods.

  • For instance, “I’m having a carb craving. I could really go for a big bowl of pasta right now.”
  • Someone might say, “Whenever I’m stressed, I get a carb craving. It’s like my body is seeking comfort.”
  • Another person might confess, “I have a carb craving every time I’m on a low-carb diet. It’s so hard to resist.”

28. Lard bucket

This term is used to describe a person who is significantly overweight or obese. It is often used in a derogatory or mocking way.

  • For example, “Look at that lard bucket over there. They should lay off the fast food.”
  • Someone might say, “I used to be a lard bucket, but I’ve been working hard to lose weight.”
  • Another person might comment, “Calling someone a lard bucket is mean-spirited. We should focus on promoting body positivity.”

29. Candy-coated

This slang term is used to describe something that appears pleasant or attractive on the surface, but may be unhealthy or deceitful underneath.

  • For instance, “Don’t be fooled by his candy-coated words. He’s just trying to manipulate you.”
  • Someone might say, “The candy-coated packaging of that product is misleading. It’s actually full of artificial ingredients.”
  • Another person might warn, “Be cautious of candy-coated promises. They often lead to disappointment.”

30. Doughnut danger

This term refers to the potential harm or temptation associated with eating doughnuts, which are often considered an unhealthy food choice due to their high sugar and fat content.

  • For example, “I can’t resist the doughnut danger. I always end up eating more than I should.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m trying to avoid doughnut danger by finding healthier alternatives for my sweet cravings.”
  • Another person might comment, “The office break room is full of doughnut danger. It’s so hard to resist the temptation.”

31. Cheese overload

Refers to consuming an excessive amount of cheese in one sitting or over a period of time.

  • For example, “I had a cheese overload last night and now I feel so bloated.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t resist a cheese overload pizza, it’s my guilty pleasure.”
  • In a discussion about indulgent foods, someone might mention, “Cheese overload is the ultimate comfort food.”

32. Sweet tooth

Describes a person who has a strong desire or preference for sweet foods.

  • For instance, “I have a sweet tooth and can’t resist desserts.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve always had a sweet tooth, even as a child.”
  • In a conversation about healthy eating, someone might admit, “I struggle with my sweet tooth and find it hard to resist sugary snacks.”

33. Meat feast

Refers to a meal that consists of a variety of meats, often in large portions.

  • For example, “We had a meat feast at the barbecue last night.”
  • A person might say, “I’m craving a meat feast pizza with all the toppings.”
  • In a discussion about protein-rich diets, someone might mention, “A meat feast can be a great source of protein for athletes.”

34. Fatty feast

Describes a meal that contains a significant amount of foods high in unhealthy fats.

  • For instance, “I indulged in a fatty feast and now I feel so guilty.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t resist a fatty feast, even though I know it’s not good for me.”
  • In a conversation about healthy eating, someone might admit, “I occasionally treat myself to a fatty feast, but I try to balance it with healthier meals.”

35. Sugar high

Refers to the feeling of increased energy or euphoria that occurs after consuming a large amount of sugar.

  • For example, “I had a sugar high after eating that whole chocolate bar.”
  • A person might say, “Kids often experience a sugar high after consuming too much candy.”
  • In a discussion about the effects of sugar on the body, someone might mention, “A sugar high is followed by a crash, which can leave you feeling tired and sluggish.”
See also  Top 25 Slang For Lazy – Meaning & Usage