Top 59 Slang For Upsetting – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing feelings of frustration, anger, or sadness, sometimes regular words just don’t cut it. That’s where slang for upsetting comes in. From subtle digs to outright venting, we’ve got a list of the most impactful and relatable slang terms to help you navigate those moments when you’re feeling anything but sunshine and rainbows. Let’s dive into this collection of expressions that perfectly capture those not-so-great emotions and situations.

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Bummed out

When something doesn’t go as planned or when a person is feeling sad or let down. “Bummed out” is often used to describe a temporary feeling of disappointment.

  • For example, “I was really bummed out when I didn’t get the job I interviewed for.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling so bummed out because my favorite band canceled their concert.”
  • Another might express, “I’ll be really bummed out if it rains on the day of the picnic.”

2. Gutted

When a person feels extremely upset or disappointed, often to the point of feeling empty or hollow inside. “Gutted” is a slang term that conveys a deep sense of emotional pain.

  • For instance, “I was absolutely gutted when I found out my partner had been cheating on me.”
  • A person might say, “I felt so gutted when I didn’t get accepted into my dream college.”
  • Another might express, “I’ll be completely gutted if I don’t get to see my favorite artist perform live.”

3. Devastated

When something has caused immense emotional pain or destruction. “Devastated” describes a state of profound sadness or loss.

  • For example, “I was devastated when I heard about the sudden death of my best friend.”
  • A person might say, “She was devastated when her house was destroyed in a fire.”
  • Another might express, “I’ll be devastated if I fail my final exams and can’t graduate.”

4. Crushed

When a person feels utterly defeated or let down, often due to a significant setback or loss. “Crushed” conveys a sense of emotional heaviness or being emotionally overwhelmed.

  • For instance, “I was absolutely crushed when my business went bankrupt.”
  • A person might say, “She felt completely crushed when her long-term relationship ended.”
  • Another might express, “I’ll be so crushed if I don’t get the job I interviewed for.”

5. Heartbroken

When a person experiences intense emotional pain or sadness, often due to the loss of a loved one or the end of a significant relationship. “Heartbroken” describes a state of deep emotional anguish.

  • For example, “He was completely heartbroken when his dog passed away.”
  • A person might say, “She felt utterly heartbroken when her partner broke up with her.”
  • Another might express, “I’ll be absolutely heartbroken if I don’t get to attend my sister’s wedding.”

6. Disheartened

When someone is disheartened, they feel discouraged or saddened by a situation or event.

  • For example, “After failing the exam, she felt disheartened and doubted her abilities.”
  • A person might say, “I was disheartened to hear that my favorite band broke up.”
  • In a discussion about a disappointing outcome, someone might comment, “The team’s loss left their fans feeling disheartened.”

7. Distraught

Distraught refers to a state of extreme upset or agitation, often due to a distressing event or situation.

  • For instance, “She was distraught after her pet dog passed away.”
  • A person might say, “I was distraught when I lost my wallet with all my important documents.”
  • In a conversation about a tragic incident, someone might express, “The whole community was distraught by the news of the accident.”

8. Wrecked

When someone is wrecked, they are emotionally or physically devastated, often as a result of a challenging experience or event.

  • For example, “She felt wrecked after the breakup of her long-term relationship.”
  • A person might say, “I was wrecked after the loss of a loved one.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult situation, someone might comment, “The natural disaster left the entire town wrecked.”

9. Shattered

Shattered refers to a state of being completely broken or devastated, often due to a traumatic or deeply upsetting event.

  • For instance, “He was shattered by the sudden death of his best friend.”
  • A person might say, “I was shattered when I found out I didn’t get the job.”
  • In a conversation about a heartbreaking experience, someone might express, “The news of the accident shattered the entire community.”

10. Up in arms

When someone is up in arms, they are extremely angry or outraged about a particular situation or issue.

  • For example, “The residents were up in arms about the proposed construction of a landfill in their neighborhood.”
  • A person might say, “I’m up in arms about the unfair treatment of workers in that company.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial decision, someone might comment, “The community was up in arms over the city council’s vote.”

11. Torn up

To feel extremely upset or emotionally destroyed.

  • For example, “I was completely torn up when I found out my dog passed away.”
  • A person might say, “She was torn up after her breakup with her long-term partner.”
  • Another might express, “I felt so torn up when I failed my final exam.”

12. Pissed off

To feel extremely angry or infuriated.

  • For instance, “I was so pissed off when someone stole my parking spot.”
  • A person might say, “He gets pissed off whenever someone interrupts him during a movie.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I’m pissed off that my flight got cancelled.”

13. Miffed

To feel slightly irritated or bothered.

  • For example, “I was miffed when my friend forgot my birthday.”
  • A person might say, “She was miffed that her favorite restaurant was closed.”
  • Another might express, “He seemed a little miffed when I accidentally spilled coffee on his shirt.”

14. Rattled

To feel disturbed or unsettled.

  • For instance, “I was rattled after witnessing a car accident.”
  • A person might say, “She was rattled by the loud thunder during the storm.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I felt so rattled after watching a horror movie.”

15. Agitated

To feel restless or irritated.

  • For example, “I was agitated by the constant noise outside my apartment.”
  • A person might say, “He gets agitated when his plans get changed unexpectedly.”
  • Another might express, “She seemed agitated during the meeting due to the tight deadline.”

16. Perturbed

This word is used to describe a feeling of annoyance or irritation. It suggests a slight disturbance or disruption to one’s peace of mind.

  • For example, “I was perturbed by the loud noise coming from my neighbor’s apartment.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling really perturbed by all the traffic on the roads today.”
  • In a conversation about a frustrating situation, someone might say, “I’m really perturbed that my package still hasn’t arrived.”

17. Bothered

This word is used to describe a feeling of being troubled or disturbed by something. It suggests a sense of unease or discomfort.

  • For instance, “I was bothered by the rude comment someone made.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling really bothered by the constant noise outside my window.”
  • In a discussion about personal boundaries, someone might say, “It really bothers me when people invade my personal space.”

18. Aggrieved

This word is used to describe a feeling of being wronged or treated unfairly. It suggests a sense of anger or resentment towards the source of the offense.

  • For example, “She felt aggrieved by her coworker’s promotion, as she believed she deserved it more.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling aggrieved by the way my friend spoke to me.”
  • In a conversation about social injustice, someone might say, “Many people in marginalized communities feel aggrieved by systemic discrimination.”

19. Peeved

This word is used to describe a feeling of being annoyed or irritated. It suggests a mild form of anger or frustration.

  • For instance, “I was peeved when my roommate ate my leftovers without asking.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling really peeved by all the delays in my travel plans.”
  • In a discussion about pet peeves, someone might say, “It really peeves me when people chew with their mouths open.”

20. Vexed

This word is used to describe a feeling of being puzzled or confused. It suggests a state of mental or emotional agitation.

  • For example, “I was vexed by the complicated instructions for assembling the furniture.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling really vexed by the contradictory information I found online.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult problem, someone might say, “I’m completely vexed by this math equation; I can’t figure it out.”

21. Chagrined

To feel chagrined is to feel embarrassed or humiliated, often due to a mistake or failure. It is a more formal term for feeling upset or disappointed.

  • For example, “I was chagrined when I realized I had forgotten my lines during the play.”
  • Someone might say, “He looked chagrined after losing the game in the final seconds.”
  • A person might feel chagrined after making a social faux pas at a party.
See also  Top 8 Slang For Contrarily – Meaning & Usage

22. Crestfallen

To be crestfallen is to be dejected or discouraged, typically because of a disappointment or setback. It describes a state of feeling downcast or disheartened.

  • For instance, “She was crestfallen when she didn’t receive the job offer.”
  • A person might say, “I felt crestfallen after my favorite team lost the championship.”
  • Someone might describe a character in a book as “crestfallen” when they receive bad news.

23. Despondent

To be despondent is to feel hopeless or despairing. It is a state of extreme sadness or depression, often due to a difficult or challenging situation.

  • For example, “He became despondent after the loss of his loved one.”
  • A person might say, “I feel despondent about the state of the world.”
  • Someone might describe a person as “despondent” when they exhibit a lack of motivation or enthusiasm.

24. Disappointed

To be disappointed is to feel let down or unsatisfied, often because something did not meet one’s expectations. It is a common term for expressing upset or discontentment.

  • For instance, “She was disappointed when her favorite restaurant closed down.”
  • A person might say, “I’m disappointed in myself for not studying harder.”
  • Someone might express disappointment in a friend’s actions, saying, “I expected better from you.”

25. Upset

To be upset is to feel disturbed or unsettled, typically due to a negative event or circumstance. It is a broad term that encompasses various degrees of emotional distress.

  • For example, “She was upset by the news of her friend’s illness.”
  • A person might say, “I’m really upset about what happened at work today.”
  • Someone might describe a child as “upset” when they start crying after getting hurt.
See also  Top 15 Slang For Consequences – Meaning & Usage

26. Sorrowful

Feeling or expressing sadness or grief. “Sorrowful” is a more formal term for feeling upset or distressed.

  • For example, “She had a sorrowful expression on her face.”
  • A person might describe their mood as “sorrowful” after receiving bad news.
  • In a poem or song, the lyrics might convey a sorrowful tone.

27. Miserable

Feeling extremely unhappy or uncomfortable. “Miserable” is a strong word to describe a state of being upset or distressed.

  • For instance, “I had a terrible day at work and I feel miserable.”
  • A person might say, “I’m so miserable right now, I can’t even smile.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, one might exclaim, “This whole situation is making me miserable!”

28. Agonized

Experiencing intense mental or physical pain. “Agonized” is a word used to describe extreme distress or upset.

  • For example, “She looked agonized as she received the news.”
  • A person might describe their emotions as “agonized” after a heartbreaking event.
  • In a discussion about a difficult decision, someone might say, “I’m agonized by the choices I have to make.”

29. Melancholic

Feeling a deep sadness or depression. “Melancholic” is a more poetic or literary term for feeling upset or distressed.

  • For instance, “The rainy weather made her feel melancholic.”
  • A person might describe their mood as “melancholic” after a loss or disappointment.
  • In a song or poem, the lyrics might evoke a melancholic atmosphere.

30. Anguished

Experiencing severe mental or physical pain. “Anguished” is a word used to describe intense distress or upset.

  • For example, “He let out an anguished cry when he received the devastating news.”
  • A person might describe their emotions as “anguished” after a traumatic event.
  • In a conversation about a heartbreaking situation, someone might say, “I can’t bear the anguished look on their face.”

31. Dismayed

Feeling unhappy or disheartened about something.

  • For example, “I was dismayed to find out I didn’t get the job.”
  • Another example could be, “She was dismayed by the results of the election.”
  • A person might say, “I was so dismayed when my favorite team lost the game.”

32. Unhappy

Feeling sad or unsatisfied with a situation or outcome.

  • For instance, “I’m unhappy with the way things are going at work.”
  • Another example could be, “She’s been feeling unhappy in her relationship.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling really unhappy lately and I’m not sure why.”

33. Dejected

Feeling sad, disheartened, or low in spirits.

  • For example, “He looked dejected after receiving the bad news.”
  • Another example could be, “She felt dejected when her friends canceled their plans.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling so dejected lately, nothing seems to be going right.”

34. Morose

Feeling gloomy, melancholy, or ill-tempered.

  • For instance, “He was in a morose mood after the argument.”
  • Another example could be, “She tends to become morose when it’s rainy outside.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t shake off this morose feeling, everything feels gray and dull.”

35. Blue

Feeling down, melancholic, or depressed.

  • For example, “She’s been feeling blue since her pet passed away.”
  • Another example could be, “He always gets a little blue around the holidays.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling a bit blue today, not sure why.”

36. Sullen

Having a gloomy or dismal expression or mood. “Sullen” is often used to describe someone who appears sad or unhappy.

  • For example, “She sat in the corner with a sullen look on her face.”
  • A person might say, “He gave me a sullen response when I asked how he was doing.”
  • In a story, the author might write, “The sullen teenager refused to speak to anyone.”

37. Glum

Feeling or looking dejected or gloomy. “Glum” is often used to describe someone who appears downcast or unhappy.

  • For instance, “He walked into the room with a glum expression.”
  • A person might say, “She seemed glum after receiving the bad news.”
  • In a movie, a character might say, “Why so glum? Cheer up!”

38. Woeful

Feeling or showing deep sorrow or distress. “Woeful” is often used to describe a situation or someone who is experiencing great sadness or unhappiness.

  • For example, “He gave a woeful sigh as he looked at the wreckage.”
  • A person might say, “I had a woeful day at work today.”
  • In a poem, the writer might describe, “The woeful cries of a lost soul.”

39. Disconsolate

Extremely sad and unable to be comforted. “Disconsolate” is often used to describe someone who is in a state of deep grief or despair.

  • For instance, “She sat on the park bench, disconsolate and alone.”
  • A person might say, “He was disconsolate after the loss of his pet.”
  • In a novel, the author might write, “The disconsolate widow wept uncontrollably.”

40. Forlorn

Feeling abandoned or lonely. “Forlorn” is often used to describe someone who is experiencing a sense of hopelessness or despair.

  • For example, “He looked out the window with a forlorn expression.”
  • A person might say, “She felt forlorn after her best friend moved away.”
  • In a song, the lyrics might express, “I’m forlorn without you by my side.”

41. Downhearted

Feeling low or depressed.

  • For example, “She felt downhearted after her pet passed away.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling downhearted lately, I think I need a break.”
  • Another might express, “Seeing the state of the world makes me feel downhearted.”

42. Downtrodden

Feeling oppressed or treated unfairly.

  • For instance, “The workers felt downtrodden by their demanding boss.”
  • In a discussion about social inequality, one might say, “The downtrodden deserve equal opportunities.”
  • A person might express, “I can’t stand seeing people being downtrodden by those in power.”

43. Heavy-hearted

Feeling great sadness or sorrow.

  • For example, “She was heavy-hearted after hearing the news of her friend’s passing.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t help but feel heavy-hearted when I see others suffering.”
  • Another might express, “The loss of a loved one can leave you heavy-hearted for a long time.”

44. Melancholy

Feeling a deep sadness or sorrow, often with no obvious cause.

  • For instance, “He couldn’t shake off the feeling of melancholy that had settled upon him.”
  • In a discussion about emotions, one might say, “Melancholy is a complex and deeply felt emotion.”
  • A person might express, “Sometimes, listening to melancholy music can actually be comforting.”

45. Mournful

Feeling deep sorrow or grief, often related to the loss of someone or something.

  • For example, “The mournful song reminded her of her late grandmother.”
  • A person might say, “The sight of the abandoned house filled her with a sense of mournful nostalgia.”
  • Another might express, “The mournful wails of the grieving widow echoed through the room.”

46. Troubled

This term describes a state of emotional or mental distress. It can also refer to someone who is experiencing difficulty or facing challenges in their life.

  • For example, “He looked troubled when he received the news.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you feeling troubled about something? You seem off.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might say, “Many people who suffer from anxiety are often troubled by intrusive thoughts.”

47. Wistful

This word describes a feeling of melancholy or longing for something in the past. It often carries a sense of sadness or regret.

  • For instance, “She had a wistful expression as she looked through old photo albums.”
  • A person might say, “I feel wistful when I think about my childhood summers.”
  • In a conversation about missed opportunities, someone might reflect, “I can’t help but feel wistful about the job offer I turned down.”

48. Regretful

This term describes the state of feeling sorry or remorseful about something that has been done or said. It often implies a sense of guilt or wishing that things had turned out differently.

  • For example, “She was regretful for not apologizing sooner.”
  • A person might say, “I’m regretful for the way I treated him.”
  • In a discussion about past mistakes, someone might admit, “I have some regretful decisions that still haunt me.”

49. Pained

This word describes the state of experiencing physical or emotional pain. It can also refer to someone who is visibly distressed or suffering.

  • For instance, “She had a pained expression on her face after the accident.”
  • A person might say, “He looked pained when he received the bad news.”
  • In a conversation about loss, someone might share, “I still feel pained by the death of my loved one.”

50. Hurt

This word describes the state of experiencing emotional or physical pain. It can refer to both physical injuries and emotional distress.

  • For example, “She felt hurt by his harsh words.”
  • A person might say, “I’m really hurt by what you did.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might share, “I’ve been hurt before, so I’m cautious about opening up to others.”

51. Aching

– She was aching after the breakup.

See also  Top 50 Slang For Wait – Meaning & Usage

52. Suffering

– He was suffering from a broken heart.

53. Tormented

– The tormented child had a troubled past.

54. Afflicted

– The afflicted woman was bedridden with illness.

55. Stricken

– The community was stricken with grief after the tragedy.

56. Affected

When someone is affected, they are experiencing strong emotions or feelings, usually in a negative way. It can refer to being upset, hurt, or disturbed.

  • For example, “I was deeply affected by the news of the tragedy.”
  • A person might say, “She seemed really affected by what he said.”
  • In a discussion about a sad movie, someone might comment, “The ending really affected me.”

57. Grieved

To grieve means to feel deep sorrow or sadness, especially due to a loss or tragedy. It is often used to describe the emotional response to the death of a loved one.

  • For instance, “She grieved for months after her dog passed away.”
  • A person might say, “I am still grieving the loss of my grandfather.”
  • In a conversation about a tragic event, someone might express, “The whole community grieved for the victims.”

58. Lamenting

Lamenting means expressing grief, sorrow, or regret. It involves openly expressing one’s sadness or disappointment about a situation.

  • For example, “She was lamenting the missed opportunity.”
  • A person might say, “I heard him lamenting over his failed relationship.”
  • In a discussion about a disappointing outcome, someone might comment, “We spent the evening lamenting our bad luck.”

59. Unsettled

When someone is unsettled, they feel disturbed, anxious, or uneasy. It can refer to a state of emotional or mental discomfort.

  • For instance, “The news left me feeling unsettled.”
  • A person might say, “I always feel unsettled when I’m in unfamiliar surroundings.”
  • In a conversation about a tense situation, someone might express, “The argument left me feeling unsettled for days.”