Top 46 Slang For Use – Meaning & Usage

Slang is constantly evolving and staying up-to-date with the latest lingo can be a challenge. That’s where we come in! We’ve done the research and compiled a list of the coolest and most current slang for use. Whether you want to impress your friends or just stay in the loop, this listicle is your go-to guide for all things trendy and hip. Get ready to level up your slang game and start speaking like a true language connoisseur!

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1. Utilize

Utilize is a formal term that means to make practical or effective use of something. It is often used in professional or technical contexts.

  • For example, a business consultant might say, “We can utilize this new software to streamline our operations.”
  • In a scientific report, a researcher might explain, “We utilized a control group to compare the results.”
  • A teacher might advise students, “Utilize your time wisely and prioritize your tasks.”

2. Employ

Employ is a more formal synonym for “use” and is commonly used in professional or formal settings.

  • For instance, a manager might say, “We need to employ new strategies to increase productivity.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might explain, “I have experience employing various software programs.”
  • A coach might instruct athletes, “Employ proper technique to maximize your performance.”

3. Make use of

“Make use of” is a phrase that means to utilize or take advantage of something. It is often used in everyday conversations.

  • For example, a friend might suggest, “You should make use of the gym membership you’re paying for.”
  • In a cooking class, the instructor might say, “Make use of fresh ingredients for the best flavor.”
  • A traveler might advise, “Make use of online resources to find the best deals on accommodations.”

4. Harness

Harness means to utilize or control a resource or energy source in a productive or efficient manner.

  • For instance, an engineer might explain, “We harnessed solar power to generate electricity.”
  • In a discussion about renewable energy, someone might say, “We need to harness the power of wind and water.”
  • A business owner might discuss, “We harnessed the potential of social media to reach a wider audience.”

5. Leverage

Leverage means to use something to maximum advantage or to gain a strategic advantage.

  • For example, a salesperson might say, “We can leverage our strong customer relationships to secure new contracts.”
  • In a negotiation, someone might suggest, “Let’s leverage our position to negotiate better terms.”
  • A marketer might explain, “We can leverage social media influencers to promote our brand.”

6. Exploit

To exploit something means to make the most of it or take advantage of it for personal gain or benefit. It can refer to using a resource, opportunity, or situation to one’s advantage.

  • For example, a business might exploit a new market opportunity to increase sales and profits.
  • In the gaming world, players might exploit a glitch in the game to gain an unfair advantage.
  • A person might exploit their connections to get a job or promotion.

7. Capitalize on

To capitalize on something means to take full advantage of it or make the most of it for personal gain or benefit. It can refer to using a situation, trend, or opportunity to one’s advantage.

  • For instance, a company might capitalize on a popular trend by releasing a related product.
  • A musician might capitalize on their viral video by releasing a new album.
  • A person might capitalize on their skills and experience to start their own business.

8. Tap into

To tap into something means to access or make use of it, often for one’s own benefit. It can refer to utilizing resources, knowledge, or networks.

  • For example, a company might tap into a new market by launching a targeted advertising campaign.
  • A student might tap into their professor’s expertise by asking for guidance on a research project.
  • A person might tap into their personal network to find job opportunities.

9. Take advantage of

To take advantage of something means to utilize or make use of it for personal gain or benefit. It can refer to using a resource, opportunity, or situation to one’s advantage.

  • For instance, a business might take advantage of a competitor’s weakness to gain market share.
  • A person might take advantage of a sale to buy something at a lower price.
  • A student might take advantage of a study group to improve their understanding of a subject.

10. Put to use

To put something to use means to employ or utilize it for a specific purpose or benefit. It can refer to using a skill, tool, or resource in a practical way.

  • For example, a chef might put their culinary skills to use in creating a new recipe.
  • A homeowner might put their DIY skills to use in renovating their house.
  • A teacher might put educational technology to use in enhancing their lessons.

11. Apply

This term is commonly used to describe the action of submitting or putting forward an application or request for something.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going to apply for a job at that company.”
  • In a college setting, a student might say, “I need to apply for financial aid.”
  • Someone might advise, “Make sure to apply early to increase your chances of getting accepted.”

12. Work with

This phrase is often used to describe the act of collaborating or cooperating with someone on a task or project.

  • For instance, a team member might say, “I’m going to work with John on this assignment.”
  • In a professional setting, a manager might say, “We need to work with other departments to achieve our goals.”
  • A person might suggest, “Let’s work with each other to find a solution.”

13. Use up

This term is used to describe the action of using or consuming all of something, resulting in its exhaustion or depletion.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’ve used up all the milk. We need to buy more.”
  • In a discussion about resources, someone might say, “We need to be careful not to use up all of our natural resources.”
  • A person might warn, “Don’t use up all your energy. Save some for later.”

14. Call upon

This phrase is often used to describe the act of requesting or asking for help or assistance from someone.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need to call upon my friends for support.”
  • In a professional setting, a manager might say, “We can call upon our colleagues in the other department for their expertise.”
  • A person might suggest, “If you’re in need, don’t hesitate to call upon others for help.”

15. Avail oneself of

This phrase is used to describe the act of taking advantage of or making use of something that is available or offered.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going to avail myself of the opportunity to study abroad.”
  • In a discussion about resources, someone might say, “We should avail ourselves of the library’s extensive collection of books.”
  • A person might advise, “If a helping hand is offered, avail yourself of it. Don’t be too proud to accept assistance.”

16. Exercise

This term refers to physical activity done to improve or maintain health and fitness. It can involve a variety of activities such as running, weightlifting, or yoga.

  • For instance, “I’m going to the gym to get some exercise.”
  • During a conversation about fitness, someone might say, “I try to get at least 30 minutes of exercise every day.”
  • A person might ask, “What’s your favorite form of exercise?”

17. Implement

To implement something means to put it into action or make it happen. It often refers to the process of applying or using a plan, idea, or strategy.

  • For example, “We need to implement new safety measures in the workplace.”
  • During a discussion about project management, someone might say, “We’re implementing a new software system to improve efficiency.”
  • A person might ask, “How do you plan to implement these changes?”

18. Operate

To operate something means to use or control it, typically a machine or system. It can also refer to the act of performing a task or function.

  • For instance, “I know how to operate a sewing machine.”
  • During a conversation about technology, someone might say, “I can’t figure out how to operate this new smartphone.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you know how to operate a forklift?”

19. Manipulate

To manipulate something means to handle or control it skillfully, often with the intention of achieving a desired outcome. It can also refer to influencing or controlling someone’s thoughts or behavior.

  • For example, “He manipulated the clay to create a beautiful sculpture.”
  • During a discussion about politics, someone might say, “Politicians often manipulate public opinion to gain support.”
  • A person might ask, “How do you manipulate the settings on this camera?”

20. Deploy

To deploy something means to put it into use or action, typically in a specific situation or context. It often refers to the process of sending or positioning resources or personnel for a particular purpose.

  • For instance, “The military deployed troops to the conflict zone.”
  • During a conversation about technology, someone might say, “We’re deploying a new software system to improve efficiency.”
  • A person might ask, “When will they deploy the new equipment?”

21. Resort to

This phrase means to use or rely on something as a last resort or when all other options have been exhausted. It implies that the action or solution being used is not ideal or preferred.

  • For example, “When the negotiations failed, they had to resort to legal action.”
  • In a difficult situation, someone might say, “I don’t want to resort to violence, but I’ll do whatever it takes to protect myself.”
  • A person discussing problem-solving methods might suggest, “Instead of resorting to quick fixes, try finding long-term solutions.”

22. Draw on

To draw on something means to use or rely on it as a source of support, inspiration, or knowledge. It implies that the person is tapping into a resource or reserve to accomplish something.

  • For instance, “She drew on her past experiences to navigate the challenging situation.”
  • In a creative process, one might say, “I often draw on nature for inspiration in my artwork.”
  • A person giving a presentation might mention, “I’ll be drawing on the latest research to support my arguments.”

23. Consume

To consume something means to use it up or deplete it. It implies that the item or resource is being used in its entirety.

  • For example, “The project consumed all of our available resources.”
  • In a discussion about energy conservation, someone might say, “We need to find ways to consume less electricity.”
  • A person discussing time management might advise, “Don’t let unimportant tasks consume your entire day.”

24. Expended

To expend something means to use it up or exhaust it, often in terms of energy, effort, or resources. It implies that the person has used all of the available quantity or capacity.

  • For instance, “He expended a great deal of effort to complete the project on time.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might say, “We’ve already expended our allocated funds for this quarter.”
  • A person giving a fitness tip might suggest, “Don’t push yourself too hard and expend all your energy during a single workout.”

25. Employed

To employ something means to use or utilize it for a specific purpose. It implies that the person is actively using the item or resource to achieve a desired outcome.

  • For example, “She employed various strategies to solve the complex problem.”
  • In a discussion about technology, one might say, “The company employed cutting-edge software to streamline their operations.”
  • A person discussing effective communication might mention, “Active listening skills should be employed to enhance understanding in a conversation.”

26. Utilized

This term refers to the act of using something or putting it into use. It often implies that something is being used effectively or efficiently.

  • For example, “The new software feature was utilized to improve productivity.”
  • In a discussion about conservation, one might say, “We need to utilize renewable energy sources to reduce our carbon footprint.”
  • A teacher might instruct their students, “Be sure to utilize your resources when completing the assignment.”

27. Put into service

This phrase means to start using something or to make it available for use. It often implies a more formal or official usage.

  • For instance, “The new transportation system was put into service last week.”
  • In a military context, one might say, “The new weapon technology will be put into service in the coming months.”
  • A company might announce, “Our new customer support system will be put into service next week.”

28. Utilise

This word is an alternative spelling of “utilize” and has the same meaning. It means to use something or put it into use.

  • For example, “The chef will utilise fresh ingredients to create a delicious meal.”
  • In a discussion about time management, one might say, “I need to utilise my time more effectively.”
  • A business owner might advise their employees, “We should utilise social media to promote our products.”

29. Utilization

This term refers to the act of using something or the state of being used. It can also refer to the extent to which something is being used or the efficiency of its usage.

  • For instance, “The utilization of renewable energy has increased in recent years.”
  • In a discussion about data analysis, one might say, “We need to improve the utilization of our data to make better decisions.”
  • A teacher might evaluate a student’s work and comment, “Good utilization of available resources.”

30. Deployment

This word refers to the act of putting something into use or action, often in a specific context or for a specific purpose. It is commonly used in military or technological contexts.

  • For example, “The deployment of troops was a strategic move.”
  • In a discussion about software development, one might say, “The deployment of the new feature will happen next week.”
  • A project manager might announce, “The deployment of the new system went smoothly.”

31. Avail

To make use of or benefit from something. The term “avail” is often used to indicate the act of using something to one’s advantage.

  • For instance, a salesperson might say, “Make sure to avail of our special discount this weekend.”
  • In a discussion about job opportunities, someone might advise, “Avail yourself of any networking events or job fairs.”
  • A friend might suggest, “You should avail of the extra study materials available at the library.”

32. Utilitarian

This term refers to something that is designed or intended for practical use rather than for aesthetics or personal enjoyment. It often implies a focus on efficiency and usefulness.

  • For example, “I prefer utilitarian clothing that is comfortable and functional.”
  • A person describing their home decor might say, “I like a utilitarian style with minimal decorations.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might argue, “The utilitarian design of this smartphone prioritizes functionality over flashy features.”

33. Operationalize

To implement or put into practical use. The term “operationalize” is often used in the context of turning a concept or idea into a functional and actionable plan.

  • For instance, a manager might say, “We need to operationalize our new marketing strategy by assigning tasks and setting deadlines.”
  • In a discussion about project management, someone might ask, “How do we operationalize this idea and make it a reality?”
  • A consultant might advise, “Operationalize your business goals by breaking them down into specific action steps.”

34. Put to work

To utilize or employ something or someone in a productive or efficient manner. The term “put to work” implies making the most out of available resources.

  • For example, a team leader might say, “Let’s put our skills and knowledge to work to solve this problem.”
  • In a discussion about a new software tool, someone might suggest, “We should put it to work and see how it improves our workflow.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “It’s time to put all your training and practice to work on the field.”

35. Utilitarianism

A philosophical principle or ethical theory that emphasizes maximizing overall happiness or well-being for the greatest number of people. Utilitarianism is often associated with the idea of making decisions based on the greatest good for the greatest number.

  • For instance, a person discussing ethical dilemmas might consider the utilitarianism approach of weighing the consequences for all individuals involved.
  • In a debate about public policy, someone might argue, “Utilitarianism should guide our decision-making process to ensure the greatest benefit for society.”
  • A philosopher might explain, “Utilitarianism is based on the principle of maximizing utility, where utility refers to the overall happiness or well-being resulting from an action.”

36. Make the most of

To make the best or most effective use of something. This phrase implies getting the greatest benefit or advantage from a situation or resource.

  • For example, a motivational speaker might say, “You have to make the most of every opportunity that comes your way.”
  • A coach might encourage their team by saying, “Let’s go out there and make the most of this game.”
  • A friend might advise, “You’re on vacation, so make the most of your time and explore as much as you can.”

37. Exploitation

The act of using or taking advantage of someone or something for personal gain, often in an unfair or unethical manner. This term can refer to the misuse or abuse of resources, people, or situations.

  • For instance, a company might be accused of exploitation if they pay their workers extremely low wages.
  • In a discussion about natural resources, someone might argue, “We need to find a balance between utilization and exploitation.”
  • A person might warn their friend, “Be careful of people who try to take advantage of you. They’re just looking for exploitation.”

38. Employing

The act of using or engaging something or someone for a specific purpose or task. This term often refers to the utilization of resources, skills, or strategies in a practical or effective manner.

  • For example, a business owner might say, “We are employing new marketing tactics to attract more customers.”
  • In a conversation about technology, someone might mention, “I’m employing the latest software to streamline my workflow.”
  • A teacher might explain to their students, “We will be employing various methods to help you understand the material.”

39. Utilizer

A person who uses or makes use of something, often in a skillful or effective manner. This term refers to individuals who employ resources or tools to achieve a desired outcome.

  • For instance, a software developer might be referred to as a utilizer of programming languages.
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “The utilizers of this app have found it to be extremely helpful.”
  • A friend might compliment another by saying, “You’re a great utilizer of time. You always manage to get things done efficiently.”

40. Utilizable

Capable of being used or put to practical use. This term implies that something is functional, effective, or suitable for a particular purpose.

  • For example, a tool or device might be described as utilizable if it serves its intended function well.
  • In a conversation about resources, someone might discuss, “The utilizable land in that area is limited.”
  • A person might ask, “Is this software utilizable on multiple operating systems?”

41. Practicality

Practicality refers to the quality of being useful or effective in real-life situations. It is often used to describe something that is practical or functional.

  • For example, “The practicality of this new gadget makes it a must-have for busy professionals.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might say, “I prioritize practicality over style when choosing my everyday outfits.”
  • A person evaluating a product might comment, “The practicality of this tool makes it a valuable addition to any toolbox.”

42. Operational

Operational refers to something that is in working order or functioning as intended. It is often used to describe the state of a system or equipment.

  • For instance, “The machine is now operational and ready for use.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We need to ensure that all departments are operational before launching the new project.”
  • A military officer might report, “All systems are operational and ready for deployment.”

43. Utilitarianistic

Utilitarianistic refers to an approach or mindset that prioritizes practicality and usefulness over other considerations. It is often used to describe actions or decisions that focus on achieving the greatest overall benefit.

  • For example, “The utilitarianistic approach to solving this problem is to choose the option that maximizes the greatest good for the greatest number.”
  • In a discussion about ethics, someone might argue, “Utilitarianistic principles suggest that we should prioritize actions that lead to the greatest overall happiness.”
  • A person evaluating a policy might comment, “The utilitarianistic nature of this policy aims to benefit the majority of the population.”

44. Implementation

Implementation refers to the process of putting a plan, system, or idea into action. It involves carrying out the necessary steps to make something happen.

  • For instance, “The successful implementation of this new software will greatly improve efficiency.”
  • In a project management context, someone might say, “We need to develop a detailed plan for the implementation phase.”
  • A team leader might discuss, “The implementation of new safety protocols is crucial to ensuring a safe work environment.”

45. Utilization rate

Utilization rate refers to the percentage or proportion of a resource or capacity that is being used or consumed. It is often used to measure the efficiency or effectiveness of utilization.

  • For example, “The utilization rate of the production line has increased by 20%.”
  • In a discussion about energy consumption, someone might say, “We need to improve the utilization rate of renewable energy sources.”
  • A business analyst might analyze, “The utilization rate of the company’s assets is a key factor in determining profitability.”

46. Utilizeable

This word is a slang term for “usable” or “able to be used.” It is often used to describe something that is practical or functional.

  • For example, “This new gadget is really utilizeable. It makes my life so much easier.”
  • A person might say, “I found a utilizeable solution to the problem.”
  • In a discussion about tools, someone might comment, “I prefer tools that are versatile and utilizeable in different situations.”
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