Top 51 Slang For Vague – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to communication, sometimes being vague can be an art form in itself. Whether you’re trying to keep things mysterious or just can’t find the right words, our team has got you covered with a list of the trendiest slang for vague expressions. Get ready to level up your conversational game and navigate those ambiguous moments with ease.

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1. Hazy

When something is hazy, it means it is not clear or easily understood. It can refer to a situation, a memory, or even a person’s thoughts.

  • For example, “The details of the incident are still hazy, and no one can agree on what really happened.”
  • A person might say, “I have a hazy memory of that night, but I can’t recall all the details.”
  • In a conversation about future plans, someone might say, “I have a hazy idea of what I want to do, but nothing is set in stone yet.”

2. Fuzzy

When something is fuzzy, it means it is unclear or indistinct. It can refer to a concept, a picture, or even a feeling.

  • For instance, “The image on the TV is fuzzy, and I can’t make out what’s happening.”
  • A person might say, “I have a fuzzy understanding of that topic, so I need to do more research.”
  • In a discussion about emotions, someone might say, “I have this fuzzy feeling that something good is about to happen.”

3. Ambiguous

When something is ambiguous, it means it has multiple meanings or interpretations. It can refer to a statement, a word, or even a situation.

  • For example, “Her response was ambiguous, and I couldn’t tell if she was happy or upset.”
  • A person might say, “The instructions are ambiguous, so I’m not sure exactly what to do.”
  • In a conversation about a movie’s ending, someone might say, “The director intentionally left it ambiguous to spark discussion and different interpretations.”

4. Nebulous

When something is nebulous, it means it is vague or unclear. It can refer to an idea, a concept, or even a plan.

  • For instance, “The concept of love is nebulous and means different things to different people.”
  • A person might say, “I have a nebulous idea for a business, but I need to flesh out the details.”
  • In a discussion about future goals, someone might say, “I have nebulous plans for the future, but I’m not sure where I want to go yet.”

5. Murky

When something is murky, it means it is unclear or confusing. It can refer to water, a situation, or even a person’s motives.

  • For example, “The water in the lake is murky, and you can’t see what’s beneath the surface.”
  • A person might say, “The details of the contract are murky, and I’m not sure if it’s a good deal.”
  • In a conversation about a person’s intentions, someone might say, “His motives are murky, and I can’t figure out what he really wants.”

6. Uncertain

When something is uncertain, it means that it is not clear or definite. It can refer to a lack of knowledge, confidence, or predictability.

  • For example, “I’m uncertain about my plans for the weekend, I haven’t decided yet.”
  • A person might say, “The outcome of the game is uncertain, both teams are evenly matched.”
  • In a discussion about the future, someone might express, “There’s a lot of uncertainty about what the next year will bring.”

7. Sketchy

When something is sketchy, it means that it is suspicious or unreliable. It can refer to a person, situation, or information that is questionable or potentially dishonest.

  • For instance, “That guy seems sketchy, I wouldn’t trust him.”
  • A person might say, “The details of the story are sketchy, I’m not sure if it’s true.”
  • In a conversation about a shady business deal, someone might comment, “The whole situation seems sketchy, I would stay away.”

8. Cryptic

When something is cryptic, it means that it is mysterious or puzzling. It can refer to a message, behavior, or situation that is difficult to understand or interpret.

  • For example, “Her text message was cryptic, I couldn’t figure out what she meant.”
  • A person might say, “The meaning behind the painting is cryptic, it’s up to interpretation.”
  • In a discussion about a riddle, someone might ask, “Can you solve this cryptic puzzle?”

9. Enigmatic

When something is enigmatic, it means that it is mysterious or perplexing. It can refer to a person, concept, or phenomenon that is difficult to understand or explain.

  • For instance, “He has always been an enigmatic figure, no one knows much about him.”
  • A person might say, “The enigmatic nature of the universe fascinates scientists.”
  • In a conversation about a complex problem, someone might comment, “The solution to this issue is enigmatic, we need to dig deeper.”

10. Indistinct

When something is indistinct, it means that it is blurry or unclear. It can refer to a sound, image, or memory that lacks clarity or definition.

  • For example, “The distant sound was indistinct, I couldn’t tell what it was.”
  • A person might say, “The details in the photo are indistinct, it’s hard to make out.”
  • In a discussion about a faded memory, someone might reminisce, “The details are indistinct, but I remember the feeling.”

11. Elusive

This term describes something that is difficult to find, catch, or understand. It often implies a sense of mystery or elusiveness.

  • For example, a person might say, “The answer to that question is elusive, no one seems to know.”
  • When discussing a rare animal, someone might say, “The snow leopard is an elusive creature, rarely seen in the wild.”
  • A writer might describe a character as “elusive,“elusive,” meaning that they are mysterious and hard to pin down.

12. Shadowy

This word describes something that is vague, mysterious, or lacking in clarity. It often implies a sense of darkness or hiddenness.

  • For instance, a person might say, “There are shadowy figures lurking in the alley.”
  • When describing a conspiracy theory, someone might say, “There are shadowy organizations pulling the strings behind the scenes.”
  • A writer might describe a setting as “shadowy,“shadowy,” meaning that it is dimly lit and has an air of mystery.
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13. Obscure

This term describes something that is not well-known, understood, or easily seen. It often implies a sense of ambiguity or lack of clarity.

  • For example, a person might say, “The meaning of that symbol is obscure, no one knows what it represents.”
  • When discussing a little-known band, someone might say, “They have an obscure following, but their music is amazing.”
  • A writer might describe a piece of artwork as “obscure,“obscure,” meaning that its meaning is not immediately apparent.

14. Cloudy

This word describes something that is not clear or easily understood. It often implies a sense of confusion or lack of transparency.

  • For instance, a person might say, “The details of the deal are still cloudy, we’re not sure what the outcome will be.”
  • When describing someone’s memory, someone might say, “My recollection of that event is a bit cloudy.”
  • A writer might describe a character’s motives as “cloudy,“cloudy,” meaning that they are unclear or hard to determine.

15. Muddled

This term describes something that is confused, disordered, or lacking in clarity. It often implies a sense of chaos or jumbledness.

  • For example, a person might say, “The instructions are muddled, I can’t figure out what to do.”
  • When describing a situation, someone might say, “The whole thing is muddled, no one knows what’s going on.”
  • A writer might describe a character’s thoughts as “muddled,“muddled,” meaning that they are confused or jumbled.

16. Unspecific

This term refers to something that lacks specific details or clarity. It can be used to describe a statement, description, or answer that is not precise or clear.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can you be more specific?” they are asking for more details because the previous information was unspecific.
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “Let’s meet up at an unspecific time, like in the afternoon.”
  • A teacher might give feedback on a student’s answer, saying, “Your response is too unspecific. Please provide more details.”

17. Blurry

This word is used to describe something that is not clear or lacks sharpness. It can refer to physical objects, images, or concepts that are difficult to perceive or understand.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I took a blurry photo because the camera was shaking.”
  • When discussing a memory, someone might say, “My recollection of that event is a bit blurry.”
  • A person might describe an unclear explanation by saying, “The instructions were blurry, so I had trouble following them.”

18. Vaporous

This term is used to describe something that is insubstantial or lacking clear definition. It can refer to ideas, concepts, or statements that are vague or lacking substance.

  • For example, someone might say, “His argument was vaporous and lacked evidence.”
  • When discussing plans, a person might say, “We have some vaporous ideas, but we need to solidify our strategy.”
  • A teacher might give feedback on a student’s writing, saying, “Your thesis statement is too vaporous. It needs to be more specific.”

19. Dim

This word is used to describe something that is not clear or lacks brightness. It can refer to physical objects, images, or concepts that are difficult to see or understand.

  • For instance, a person might say, “The room was dim, so I couldn’t see clearly.”
  • When discussing a memory, someone might say, “My recollection of that event is a bit dim.”
  • A person might describe an unclear explanation by saying, “His instructions were dim, so I had trouble following them.”

20. Woolly

This term is used to describe something that is unclear or lacking in precision. It can refer to statements, descriptions, or ideas that are vague or lacking in detail.

  • For example, someone might say, “His explanation was woolly and didn’t provide clear answers.”
  • When discussing plans, a person might say, “We have some woolly ideas, but we need to refine our strategy.”
  • A teacher might give feedback on a student’s writing, saying, “Your argument is too woolly. It needs to be more focused and specific.”

21. Dubious

This slang term is used to describe something or someone that is suspicious or questionable. It implies a lack of trust or uncertainty.

  • For example, “I don’t trust that guy, he seems really dubious.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “The evidence presented is dubious at best.”
  • A person might describe a shady business practice by saying, “Their accounting methods are very dubious.”

22. Shady

When something is described as “shady,” it means that it is suspicious or untrustworthy. The term implies a lack of transparency or honesty.

  • For instance, “That guy gives me a shady vibe, I wouldn’t trust him.”
  • In a discussion about a questionable action, someone might say, “That deal seems really shady.”
  • A person might describe a dishonest business practice by saying, “Their business dealings are very shady.”

23. Enshrouded

To be “enshrouded” means to be covered or surrounded by a mysterious or secretive aura. It implies a sense of uncertainty or hidden information.

  • For example, “The enshrouded figure disappeared into the night.”
  • In a discussion about a mysterious event, someone might say, “The details of the incident are enshrouded in secrecy.”
  • A person might describe a hidden agenda by saying, “Their true intentions are enshrouded in mystery.”

24. Unsettled

When something is described as “unsettled,” it means that it is not resolved or decided. It implies a lack of stability or certainty.

  • For instance, “The future of their relationship is still unsettled.”
  • In a discussion about an unresolved issue, someone might say, “The matter remains unsettled.”
  • A person might describe a state of indecision by saying, “I feel unsettled about which option to choose.”

25. Ghostly

To be “ghostly” means to have a mysterious or otherworldly quality, often associated with ghosts or the supernatural. It implies a sense of vagueness or intangibility.

  • For example, “The ghostly figure floated through the room.”
  • In a discussion about a strange occurrence, someone might say, “There was a ghostly presence in the house.”
  • A person might describe a hazy memory by saying, “I only have a ghostly recollection of that event.”

26. Dodgy

This term is used to describe something or someone that seems questionable or untrustworthy.

  • For example, “I wouldn’t buy that car, it looks a bit dodgy.”
  • A person might say, “I had a dodgy feeling about that guy from the start.”
  • In a conversation about a shady business deal, someone might comment, “The whole thing sounds dodgy to me.”

27. Cagey

When someone is cagey, they are being evasive or cautious about revealing information.

  • For instance, “He was being cagey about where he was last night.”
  • A person might say, “She’s always cagey about her personal life.”
  • In a discussion about a secretive person, someone might comment, “He’s so cagey, you never really know what he’s up to.”

28. Deceptive

This term is used to describe something or someone that intentionally gives a false impression or misleads others.

  • For example, “The advertisement was deceptive, the product didn’t live up to its claims.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t trust him, he’s always being deceptive.”
  • In a discussion about a manipulative person, someone might comment, “She has a deceptive way of getting what she wants.”

29. Devious

This term is used to describe someone who is sneaky, crafty, or manipulative.

  • For instance, “He came up with a devious plan to get what he wanted.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t trust her, she’s always up to something devious.”
  • In a discussion about a clever trick, someone might comment, “That was a devious move, I didn’t see it coming.”

30. Evasive

This term is used to describe someone who is intentionally avoiding answering a question or being unclear about their intentions.

  • For example, “He was being evasive when I asked him about his plans.”
  • A person might say, “She’s always evasive when you ask her personal questions.”
  • In a discussion about a politician’s response, someone might comment, “His answer was evasive, he didn’t address the question directly.”

31. Shifty

This term refers to someone who is evasive or deceitful, often making it difficult to pin down their true intentions or actions.

  • For example, “I don’t trust that guy, he seems shifty.”
  • A person might say, “He gave me a shifty look, like he was hiding something.”
  • In a conversation about a dishonest person, someone might comment, “He has a shifty demeanor that makes it hard to believe anything he says.”

32. Slippery

This slang term is used to describe someone or something that is elusive or difficult to understand or catch.

  • For instance, “He gave a slippery response, avoiding a direct answer.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult problem, someone might say, “It’s a slippery issue that requires careful handling.”
  • A person might describe a smooth-talking salesperson as “slippery” because they are hard to resist or pin down.
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33. Sneaky

This term is used to describe someone who behaves in a secretive or underhanded manner, often for personal gain or to avoid detection.

  • For example, “He’s a sneaky little thief, always finding ways to steal unnoticed.”
  • In a conversation about a cunning plan, someone might say, “That’s a sneaky way to get what you want.”
  • A person might describe a coworker as “sneaky” because they often take credit for others’ work without being caught.

34. Wily

This slang term refers to someone who is clever and skilled at manipulating situations or people to their advantage.

  • For instance, “He’s a wily politician, always finding loopholes to get what he wants.”
  • In a discussion about a clever strategy, someone might say, “That’s a wily move that caught everyone off guard.”
  • A person might describe a con artist as “wily” because they are skilled at tricking others without getting caught.

35. Cagy

This term is used to describe someone who is careful and guarded in their actions or speech, often to avoid revealing too much or getting into trouble.

  • For example, “He’s cagy about his past, never giving a straight answer.”
  • In a conversation about a secretive person, someone might say, “She’s always cagy about her plans, never sharing details.”
  • A person might describe a spy as “cagy” because they are skilled at keeping their true intentions hidden.

36. Covert

Refers to something that is hidden or kept secret. It implies that there is an element of secrecy or concealment involved.

  • For example, “The covert operation was successful in gathering valuable intelligence.”
  • In a discussion about espionage, one might say, “Covert operations are a crucial aspect of intelligence gathering.”
  • A person might describe a hidden agenda as “covert intentions.”

37. Mysterious

Describes something that is difficult to understand or explain, often due to its complex or puzzling nature. It suggests an air of intrigue and curiosity.

  • For instance, “The mysterious disappearance of the treasure has baffled historians for centuries.”
  • In a conversation about unsolved mysteries, one might say, “The Bermuda Triangle is known for its mysterious disappearances.”
  • A person might describe a person with an aura of mystique as “mysterious.”

38. Shrouded in mystery

Indicates that something is hidden or unknown, often due to deliberate concealment or lack of information. It suggests that there are many unanswered questions or uncertainties surrounding the subject.

  • For example, “The origins of the ancient artifact are shrouded in mystery.”
  • In a discussion about conspiracy theories, one might say, “The government’s involvement in the incident is shrouded in mystery.”
  • A person might describe a haunted house as “shrouded in mystery.”

39. Tangled

Refers to a situation or concept that is intricate, complex, or difficult to understand. It implies a state of confusion or disarray.

  • For instance, “The tangled web of relationships in the soap opera made it hard to keep track of who was dating whom.”
  • In a conversation about a complicated legal case, one might say, “The evidence presented in court was a tangled mess.”
  • A person might describe a confusing set of instructions as “tangled.”
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40. Waffling

Describes a person who is hesitant or wavering in making a decision or expressing a clear opinion. It implies a lack of confidence or firmness.

  • For example, “The politician’s waffling response to the question left the audience confused.”
  • In a discussion about choosing a restaurant, one might say, “Stop waffling and just pick a place.”
  • A person might describe someone who constantly changes their mind as “waffling.”

41. Dilly-dallying

This term refers to the act of procrastinating or taking too long to make a decision or take action. It implies a lack of urgency or purpose.

  • For example, “Stop dilly-dallying and make a choice already!”
  • A parent might scold their child, “Quit dilly-dallying and get ready for school.”
  • In a work setting, a supervisor might say, “We can’t afford any dilly-dallying. We need to meet our deadlines.”

42. Playing it close to the chest

This phrase means to keep information or plans hidden and not reveal them to others. It suggests being cautious and guarded with one’s thoughts or intentions.

  • For instance, “He’s playing it close to the chest about his next career move.”
  • A friend might say, “I can’t believe she’s playing it close to the chest about her relationship.”
  • In a business negotiation, one party might accuse the other of playing it close to the chest to gain an advantage.

43. Keeping it under wraps

This expression means to keep something hidden or confidential, not allowing others to know about it. It implies a deliberate effort to maintain privacy or prevent information from being leaked.

  • For example, “The company is keeping the new product under wraps until the official launch.”
  • A friend might say, “I have some exciting news, but I’m keeping it under wraps for now.”
  • A celebrity might announce, “I’m getting married, but we’re keeping the details under wraps to maintain privacy.”

44. Beating around the bush

This phrase means to avoid getting to the point or addressing the main issue, often by speaking indirectly or vaguely. It suggests a reluctance to be straightforward or confrontational.

  • For instance, “Stop beating around the bush and tell me what you really think.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s not beat around the bush. We need to address the budget shortfall.”
  • A parent might scold their child, “Quit beating around the bush and tell me the truth.”

45. Hemming and hawing

This expression refers to the act of hesitating or wavering in making a decision or giving a response. It implies a lack of confidence or clarity in one’s thoughts or opinions.

  • For example, “He’s been hemming and hawing about whether to accept the job offer.”
  • A friend might say, “Stop hemming and hawing and just choose a restaurant.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might criticize, “Instead of hemming and hawing, let’s make a decision and move forward.”

46. Hushed

This term refers to a state of being quiet or subdued, often used to describe a conversation or atmosphere. It can also imply secrecy or confidentiality.

  • For example, “They had a hushed conversation in the corner of the room.”
  • In a library, a librarian might say, “Please keep your voices hushed.”
  • A person describing a mysterious event might say, “The room fell hushed as everyone waited for the secret to be revealed.”

47. Muffled

This word describes a sound that is dulled or muted, often due to being covered or blocked in some way. It can also be used to describe a feeling or emotion that is not fully expressed.

  • For instance, “The sound of the explosion was muffled by the thick walls.”
  • A person with a cold might say, “My voice sounds muffled.”
  • Someone trying to stifle their laughter might say, “I couldn’t help but let out a muffled giggle.”

48. Shrouded

This term refers to something that is covered or concealed, often implying a sense of mystery or secrecy. It can also be used to describe a person or place that is surrounded by an aura of secrecy or darkness.

  • For example, “The mountain peak was shrouded in mist.”
  • A detective might say, “The case is shrouded in secrecy.”
  • A person describing a haunted house might say, “The old mansion was shrouded in darkness.”

49. Ambivalent

This word describes a state of being uncertain or conflicted, often used to describe a person’s feelings or attitude towards something. It implies a lack of decisiveness or a mixture of opposing emotions.

  • For instance, “She felt ambivalent about the job offer, unsure if she should accept or decline.”
  • A person discussing a controversial topic might say, “I have ambivalent feelings about the issue.”
  • Someone describing their conflicting emotions might say, “I’m ambivalent about going to the party because I don’t really know anyone there.”

50. Indeterminate

This term refers to something that is unclear or undefined, often used to describe a situation or outcome that is not easily determined or known. It can also imply a lack of specificity or precision.

  • For example, “The exact time of the meeting is still indeterminate.”
  • A person describing a blurry photograph might say, “The image is indeterminate and hard to make out.”
  • A scientist discussing an inconclusive experiment might say, “The results were indeterminate, and further research is needed to draw any conclusions.”

51. Inconclusive

When something is inconclusive, it means that it is not able to be determined or resolved definitively. It refers to a lack of clear evidence or a final conclusion.

  • For example, in a scientific study, the results might be inconclusive, meaning that they do not provide a clear answer.
  • In a court case, if the evidence is inconclusive, it means that it does not definitively prove guilt or innocence.
  • A person might say, “The investigation into the crime was inconclusive, leaving many unanswered questions.”