Top 35 Slang For Viable – Meaning & Usage

Looking to spice up your vocabulary with some fresh and trendy words? Well, look no further because we’ve got you covered with our latest compilation of the top slang for “viable.” Whether you’re a language enthusiast or just looking to stay hip with the latest lingo, this list is sure to keep you in the loop. So, sit back, relax, and get ready to level up your slang game with us!

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1. Legit

This word is used to describe something that is authentic, genuine, or true. It can also mean that something is cool or impressive.

  • For example, “That concert was legit amazing!”
  • A person might say, “I just got a legit job offer.”
  • Another might comment, “That’s a legit argument.”

2. Doable

This term refers to something that is achievable or able to be done.

  • For instance, “Is finishing this project by tomorrow doable?”
  • A person might say, “It’s doable, but it will require a lot of effort.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you think running a marathon is doable for me?”

3. Feasible

Feasible means that something is practical or possible to achieve or carry out.

  • For example, “We need to determine if this plan is feasible.”
  • A person might say, “It’s not feasible to complete this task in such a short amount of time.”
  • Another might comment, “We need to come up with a feasible solution to this problem.”

4. Workable

Workable means that something is able to work or function properly.

  • For instance, “We need to find a workable solution to this issue.”
  • A person might say, “The current system is not workable and needs to be replaced.”
  • Another might comment, “We need to make some adjustments to make this plan more workable.”

5. Achievable

Achievable means that something is capable of being achieved or accomplished.

  • For example, “Setting realistic goals is important for achieving success.”
  • A person might say, “This task is definitely achievable with the right resources.”
  • Another might comment, “We need to break down our big goals into smaller achievable steps.”

6. Realistic

Something that is achievable or practical in reality. It refers to ideas or goals that are grounded in reality and not overly optimistic or idealistic.

  • For example, if someone says, “It’s not realistic to expect everyone to agree on this issue,” they mean that it is not practical or achievable for everyone to have the same opinion.
  • In a discussion about career goals, someone might say, “It’s important to set realistic expectations for what you can achieve in a certain time frame.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Your goal of completing all the assignments in one day is not realistic. Pace yourself and set more achievable goals.”

7. Attainable

Something that is possible to obtain or reach. It refers to goals or objectives that can be realistically accomplished.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I believe that winning the championship is an attainable goal for our team,” they mean that it is possible for their team to achieve that goal.
  • In a conversation about personal growth, someone might say, “Setting attainable goals is important for staying motivated and feeling a sense of accomplishment.”
  • A coach might encourage their players by saying, “Keep pushing yourselves. Remember, success is attainable if you work hard and believe in yourselves.”

8. Pragmatic

A practical approach or mindset that focuses on what is realistic and achievable. It refers to being sensible and logical in decision-making, considering practicality and effectiveness.

  • For example, if someone says, “Let’s take a pragmatic approach to solving this problem,” they mean that they want to find a practical solution that is based on reality and effectiveness.
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might describe a politician as pragmatic if they prioritize practical solutions over ideological purity.
  • A manager might encourage their team to be pragmatic by saying, “Let’s focus on what is practical and achievable within our resources and timeframe.”

9. Plausible

Something that is believable or reasonable. It refers to ideas or explanations that are logically consistent and can be accepted as possible or likely.

  • For instance, if someone says, “The theory that aliens exist is plausible,” they mean that it is possible or reasonable to believe in the existence of aliens.
  • In a conversation about a crime investigation, someone might say, “The suspect’s alibi seems plausible based on the available evidence.”
  • A writer might describe a fictional plot twist as plausible if it is consistent with the established story and characters.
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10. Realizable

Something that can be made a reality or accomplished. It refers to goals, dreams, or ideas that can be turned into tangible results or outcomes.

  • For example, if someone says, “With hard work and determination, your dream of becoming a successful entrepreneur is realizable,” they mean that it is possible for the person to achieve their dream.
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “Setting specific and actionable steps is key to making your goals realizable.”
  • A mentor might encourage their mentee by saying, “Remember, your potential is limitless. Anything is realizable if you believe in yourself and put in the effort.”

11. Possible

Refers to something that can be done or achieved. It suggests that there is a chance or likelihood of success.

  • For example, a person might say, “It’s possible to finish this project by the end of the week.”
  • In a discussion about future plans, someone might ask, “Do you think it’s possible for us to travel the world?”
  • A motivational speaker might say, “Believe in yourself and anything is possible.”

12. Within reach

Means that something is easily accessible or achievable. It implies that the desired outcome or goal is close enough to be obtained or accomplished.

  • For instance, a person might say, “With hard work and determination, success is within reach.”
  • In a conversation about career goals, someone might say, “I believe that promotion is within reach for me.”
  • A coach might encourage their team by saying, “Keep pushing, victory is within reach.”

13. Obtainable

Refers to something that can be obtained or acquired. It suggests that the desired item or goal is within one’s reach or grasp.

  • For example, a person might say, “The job offer is obtainable if you meet the qualifications.”
  • In a discussion about rare collectibles, someone might say, “That limited edition item is highly sought after but still obtainable.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “With hard work and dedication, good grades are obtainable.”

14. Real-world

Refers to something that is applicable or relevant in the real world or practical situations. It suggests that the idea or concept can be implemented or used effectively.

  • For instance, a person might say, “We need to come up with a real-world solution to this problem.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might say, “It’s important to have a real-world understanding of your expenses.”
  • A business consultant might advise their client, “Make sure your marketing strategy is grounded in real-world data and consumer behavior.”

15. Sensible

Means that something is logical, practical, or sensible. It suggests that the idea or course of action is rational and makes sense.

  • For example, a person might say, “It’s sensible to save money for emergencies.”
  • In a conversation about travel plans, someone might say, “It’s not sensible to book a trip during hurricane season.”
  • A financial advisor might recommend, “It’s sensible to create a budget and stick to it for long-term financial stability.”

16. Logical

When something is logical, it means that it follows a reasonable and rational thought process. It implies that the information or argument presented is based on sound reasoning and can be easily understood.

  • For example, “It’s logical to assume that if it’s raining outside, you’ll need an umbrella.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “Your argument is not logical because it contradicts established facts.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Your answer is not logical because it doesn’t address the question.”

17. Rational

Being rational means making decisions and forming opinions based on logical and sensible thinking. It involves considering all relevant factors and making judgments that are fair and balanced.

  • For instance, someone might say, “It’s not rational to spend all your money on unnecessary purchases.”
  • In a discussion about politics, one might argue, “We need leaders who make rational decisions based on facts and evidence.”
  • A therapist might advise a patient, “Try to approach your problems in a rational and calm manner.”

18. Credible

When something is credible, it means that it is reliable and can be trusted. It implies that the information or source is reputable and has a high level of integrity.

  • For example, “I only believe news articles from credible sources.”
  • In a courtroom, a lawyer might say, “The witness’s testimony is not credible because they have a history of lying.”
  • A student might ask their teacher, “Can you recommend some credible sources for my research paper?”

19. Sound

When something is sound, it means that it is based on valid reasoning and is free from logical flaws. It implies that the argument or decision is well-founded and can be relied upon.

  • For instance, “Your plan to increase revenue sounds sound to me.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “We need to make sound financial decisions to ensure the company’s success.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “We need to have a sound strategy in order to win the game.”

20. Effective

Being effective means achieving the desired result or outcome. It implies that the action or method used is successful in producing the intended effect.

  • For example, “Regular exercise is an effective way to improve physical fitness.”
  • In a marketing campaign, someone might say, “We need to come up with an effective strategy to attract more customers.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Using flashcards can be an effective study tool.”

21. Efficient

This term refers to something that is able to accomplish a task quickly and effectively, without wasting time or resources. It suggests a high level of productivity and minimal effort or waste.

  • For example, a coworker might say, “Wow, you finished that report so efficiently!”
  • In a business context, a manager might praise an employee’s work by saying, “You have a really efficient approach to problem-solving.”
  • A student might ask a classmate, “Can you give me some tips on how to study more efficiently?”

22. Productive

This term describes the ability to generate or achieve a significant amount of output or results. It implies being efficient and effective in completing tasks and making progress towards goals.

  • For instance, a team leader might say, “Let’s focus on being productive and meeting our deadlines.”
  • In a work setting, a coworker might compliment another by saying, “You’re so productive, you always get so much done.”
  • A student might say, “I need to find a way to be more productive with my study time.”

23. Promising

This term suggests that something has a high potential for success or positive outcomes in the future. It implies that there are good indications or prospects for favorable results.

  • For example, a manager might say, “This new project looks very promising, it could be a game-changer for our company.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “We have a promising young talent on our team.”
  • A friend might encourage another by saying, “Don’t worry, things will get better, you have a promising future ahead.”

24. Tenable

This term describes something that is capable of being maintained or continued over a long period of time. It suggests that the situation or idea is viable and can withstand challenges or changes.

  • For instance, a professor might say, “Your argument is tenable, it is supported by strong evidence.”
  • In a business context, a consultant might advise a company to focus on tenable growth strategies.
  • A friend might offer encouragement by saying, “I believe in you, you have a tenable plan for success.”

25. Practical

This term refers to something that is realistic and can be put into practice or action. It implies that the idea or solution is sensible, achievable, and likely to work in a practical sense.

  • For example, a team member might suggest a practical approach to solving a problem.
  • In a discussion about travel plans, someone might say, “Let’s consider practical options that fit within our budget.”
  • A teacher might say, “It’s important to choose a practical career path that aligns with your skills and interests.”

26. Viable

Refers to something that is capable of working or being successful. It is often used to describe a plan, idea, or solution that is practical and realistic.

  • For example, “I think this business venture is viable and has a good chance of success.”
  • In a discussion about potential solutions to a problem, someone might say, “Let’s brainstorm viable options that we can actually implement.”
  • A student might ask a teacher, “Is my research topic viable for this assignment?”

27. Sustainable

This term is commonly used to describe practices, products, or systems that are designed to have minimal negative impact on the environment and can be maintained or continued over a long period of time.

  • For instance, “We need to adopt more sustainable farming methods to protect the planet.”
  • In a conversation about renewable energy, someone might say, “Solar power is a sustainable source of electricity.”
  • A person discussing lifestyle choices might mention, “I try to buy sustainable products whenever possible.”

28. Operable

Refers to something that is in working order or capable of being used or operated. It is often used to describe machinery, equipment, or systems.

  • For example, “The car is operable again after the mechanic fixed the engine.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “The new app is not operable on older devices.”
  • A person checking the functionality of a device might ask, “Is this printer operable or do I need to troubleshoot?”

29. Persuasive

Describes something that is convincing or able to persuade others to believe or act in a certain way. It is often used to describe arguments, speeches, or presentations that are effective in changing someone’s opinion or behavior.

  • For instance, “The lawyer presented a persuasive case that convinced the jury.”
  • In a discussion about advertising, someone might say, “This commercial is very persuasive and makes me want to buy the product.”
  • A student might ask a classmate, “Can you help me come up with persuasive arguments for my debate?”

30. Convincing

Similar to “persuasive,” this term describes something that is able to convince or persuade others. It is often used to describe evidence, arguments, or explanations that are strong and credible.

  • For example, “The scientist provided convincing data to support their hypothesis.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I find their argument very convincing and well-reasoned.”
  • A person discussing a movie might say, “The actor’s performance was so convincing that I forgot they were playing a fictional character.”

31. Believable

This term refers to something that is considered trustworthy or plausible. It implies that the information or statement is convincing and can be relied upon.

  • For example, if someone tells a convincing story, you might say, “That sounds believable.”
  • In a discussion about conspiracy theories, someone might argue, “The evidence presented is not believable.”
  • A person might ask, “Is the source of this information believable?”

32. Trustworthy

This term describes something or someone that can be trusted or relied upon. It implies that the person or thing is dependable and can be counted on to deliver what is promised.

  • For instance, if someone consistently keeps their word, you might say, “They are trustworthy.”
  • In a conversation about hiring a contractor, someone might say, “We need to find a trustworthy person for the job.”
  • A person might ask, “Is this website trustworthy? Can I trust the information provided?”

33. Solid

This term is used to describe something that is strong, reliable, or dependable. It implies that the person or thing is steadfast and can be counted on to perform well.

  • For example, if someone consistently produces high-quality work, you might say, “They always deliver solid results.”
  • In a discussion about a reliable car, someone might say, “That brand is known for producing solid vehicles.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you think this plan is solid? Can we rely on it?”

34. Suitable

This term refers to something that is fitting or appropriate for a particular purpose or situation. It implies that the person or thing is well-suited and meets the necessary requirements.

  • For instance, if someone is looking for a job, you might say, “That position seems suitable for your skills.”
  • In a conversation about choosing the right outfit, someone might say, “Wear something suitable for the occasion.”
  • A person might ask, “Is this font suitable for a formal document?”

35. Acceptable

This term describes something that is considered satisfactory or allowed within certain boundaries or standards. It implies that the person or thing meets the minimum requirements or criteria.

  • For example, if someone proposes a plan, you might say, “That seems acceptable.”
  • In a discussion about behavior, someone might say, “That type of language is not acceptable.”
  • A person might ask, “Is it acceptable to arrive 15 minutes late?”