Top 50 Slang For Weapon – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to discussing weapons, there’s a whole arsenal of slang terms that can leave you feeling a bit overwhelmed. But fear not, as we’ve got you covered! Join us as we unveil some of the most popular and intriguing slang for weapons that will have you feeling like a pro in no time. So lock and load, and get ready to expand your knowledge in this exciting world of weaponry!

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1. Piece

“Piece” is a colloquial term often used to refer to a firearm, especially in urban settings.

  • For example, in crime movies, a character might say, “Make sure you’re packing a piece before the deal.”
  • A person discussing gun rights might argue, “Every citizen has the right to own a firearm for self-defense.”
  • Another might caution, “Handling a firearm requires proper training and respect for the weapon’s power.”

2. Heater

A slang term for a firearm, particularly one that is known for its ability to generate heat when fired.

  • For instance, a character in a crime novel might say, “He reached into his coat pocket and pulled out his trusty heater.”
  • In a discussion about historical firearms, someone might mention, “The Colt Peacemaker was a popular heater during the Wild West era.”
  • A gun enthusiast might remark, “My favorite type of heater is a high-capacity semi-automatic pistol.”

3. Roscoe

This term is often used to refer to a revolver, a type of repeating handgun with a revolving cylinder containing multiple chambers and at least one barrel for firing.

  • For example, in a detective novel set in the 1920s, a character might say, “I always keep my trusty roscoe by my side.”
  • In a discussion about classic firearms, someone might mention, “The Colt Python is a highly sought-after roscoe among collectors.”
  • A gun enthusiast might note, “While semi-automatic pistols are more popular today, there’s still something nostalgic about a classic roscoe.”

4. Iron

A slang term for a firearm, derived from the idea that guns are made of iron or other metal materials.

  • For instance, a character in a gangster movie might say, “I always carry my iron for protection.”
  • In a discussion about personal defense, someone might argue, “Having an iron can provide peace of mind in dangerous situations.”
  • A gun enthusiast might comment, “I prefer the weight and feel of an all-metal iron over a polymer-framed pistol.”

5. Gat

A slang term for a firearm, often used in urban or hip-hop culture.

  • For example, in a rap song, an artist might say, “I keep my gat close, ready for any situation.”
  • In a discussion about gun violence, someone might argue, “Easy access to gats contributes to the problem.”
  • A gun enthusiast might mention, “The term ‘gat’ has a long history and is rooted in the criminal underworld.”

6. Blaster

A blaster is a fictional energy weapon that shoots concentrated beams of energy. It is commonly used in science fiction and futuristic settings.

  • For example, in the Star Wars franchise, blasters are the primary weapons used by characters such as Han Solo and Luke Skywalker.
  • In a discussion about futuristic technology, someone might say, “Imagine if we had blasters like they do in the movies.”
  • A fan of science fiction might comment, “I wish blasters were real! They would be so cool to have.”

7. Boomstick

Boomstick is a slang term for a shotgun, a type of firearm that is designed to be fired from the shoulder and uses the energy of a fixed shell to fire a number of small spherical pellets called shot.

  • For instance, in the movie “Army of Darkness,” the protagonist refers to his shotgun as his boomstick.
  • In a discussion about home defense, someone might say, “I keep a boomstick under my bed just in case.”
  • A gun enthusiast might comment, “Shotguns are versatile weapons, and the sound they make is quite impressive.”

8. Chopper

Chopper is a slang term for an automatic rifle, which is a type of firearm that can continuously fire rounds as long as the trigger is held down.

  • For example, in gangster movies, characters might refer to their automatic rifles as choppers.
  • In a discussion about military weapons, someone might mention, “The chopper is a popular choice among soldiers due to its firepower.”
  • A person interested in firearms might say, “I’ve always wanted to shoot a chopper at a shooting range.”

9. Piece of steel

Piece of steel is a slang term for a knife, which is a cutting tool consisting of a blade attached to a handle.

  • For instance, in a crime novel, a character might refer to their knife as a piece of steel.
  • In a discussion about self-defense, someone might say, “A piece of steel can be a valuable tool for personal protection.”
  • A knife enthusiast might comment, “I collect all kinds of pieces of steel, from pocket knives to kitchen knives.”

10. Equalizer

Equalizer is a slang term for a handgun, which is a handheld firearm designed to be fired with one hand.

  • For example, in action movies, characters might refer to their handguns as equalizers.
  • In a discussion about gun control, someone might argue, “Handguns are often seen as equalizers, allowing individuals to protect themselves.”
  • A person interested in self-defense might say, “I carry an equalizer with me for peace of mind.”

11. Rod

This slang term is often used to refer to a firearm, specifically a handgun. It can also be used to describe any type of weapon that is long and cylindrical in shape.

  • For example, a character in a crime novel might say, “He pulled out his rod and fired a warning shot.”
  • In a discussion about self-defense, someone might argue, “Carrying a rod can give you a sense of security.”
  • A person discussing gun control might say, “We need stricter regulations to keep dangerous rods out of the wrong hands.”

12. Banger

In slang terms, “banger” can refer to an explosive device, such as a bomb or firework. It can also be used to describe a powerful weapon that is capable of causing significant damage.

  • For instance, a character in an action movie might say, “I’ve got a banger that will blow up the entire building.”
  • In a conversation about military weaponry, someone might mention, “Bangers are often used in combat situations to create distractions.”
  • A person discussing the dangers of homemade explosives might warn, “You should never attempt to make a banger without proper training and knowledge.”

13. Peacemaker

This slang term is often used to refer to a specific type of revolver, particularly the Colt Single Action Army revolver. The term “peacemaker” is derived from the historical context of the revolver being used to settle disputes and maintain peace.

  • For example, a fan of Western movies might say, “The cowboy drew his peacemaker and shot the outlaw.”
  • In a discussion about iconic firearms, someone might mention, “The peacemaker played a significant role in the American frontier.”
  • A gun collector might proudly show off their peacemaker and say, “This is a classic example of a peacemaker from the late 1800s.”

14. Hardware

In slang terms, “hardware” is often used to refer to any type of weapon. It can also be used more broadly to describe any type of equipment or tools used for a specific purpose.

  • For instance, a character in a crime novel might say, “He’s got a stash of hardware hidden in his basement.”
  • In a discussion about self-defense, someone might argue, “Knowing how to use your hardware effectively is crucial.”
  • A person discussing military operations might mention, “The soldiers were equipped with the latest hardware to carry out their mission.”

15. Tool

In slang terms, “tool” is often used to refer to any type of weapon. It can also be used to describe a person who is easily manipulated or used by others.

  • For example, a character in a gangster movie might say, “He’s just a tool for the mob boss.”
  • In a conversation about personal safety, someone might caution, “Always be aware of your surroundings and carry a tool for self-defense.”
  • A person discussing the dangers of violence might argue, “Using a tool to solve conflicts only perpetuates the cycle of violence.”

16. Smoke wagon

This slang term is often used to refer to a firearm, particularly a handgun. It is derived from the imagery of smoke rising from the barrel of a gun after it has been fired.

  • For example, in a Western movie, a character might say, “Draw your smoke wagon if you want to survive.”
  • A person discussing their concealed carry weapon might say, “I always keep my smoke wagon close by for protection.”
  • In a crime novel, a detective might refer to a murder weapon as a smoke wagon.
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17. Lead dispenser

This slang term humorously describes a firearm as a device that dispenses lead projectiles. It is often used in a lighthearted or sarcastic manner.

  • For instance, a gun enthusiast might say, “My trusty lead dispenser never fails to hit the mark.”
  • In a conversation about self-defense, someone might ask, “Do you have a reliable lead dispenser for protection?”
  • A person discussing the power of firearms might say, “A lead dispenser can deliver a lot of force in a small package.”

18. Stick

In the context of slang for weapons, “stick” is often used to refer to a knife. It conveys a sense of danger and threat.

  • For example, a criminal might say, “I’ll stick you if you don’t hand over your wallet.”
  • In a discussion about self-defense, someone might say, “It’s always good to have a stick on you for emergencies.”
  • A person discussing a fight might describe it as, “He pulled out a stick and things got real intense.”

19. Shooter

This slang term is a general reference to a firearm, particularly a handgun. It emphasizes the action of shooting and can be used to describe any type of gun.

  • For instance, a police officer might radio in, “Suspect armed with a shooter, proceed with caution.”
  • In a conversation about firearms, someone might say, “I prefer a reliable shooter for self-defense.”
  • A gun enthusiast might discuss the features of different shooters, saying, “I love the accuracy of this particular shooter.”

20. Blunderbuss

This slang term refers to an old-fashioned type of firearm, specifically a shotgun with a short barrel and a wide muzzle. The term is often used to describe a large and powerful weapon.

  • For example, in a historical fiction novel, a character might say, “He fired his blunderbuss into the air to signal the start of the battle.”
  • In a discussion about antique firearms, someone might say, “I recently acquired a beautiful blunderbuss from the 18th century.”
  • A gun collector might show off their blunderbuss and say, “This is one of the most unique weapons in my collection.”

21. Cannon

A cannon is a large, heavy gun that fires projectiles using gunpowder or other explosive materials. It is often used in military warfare or for ceremonial purposes.

  • For example, during a historical reenactment, you might see a cannon being fired.
  • In a discussion about military strategy, someone might mention, “The cannons played a crucial role in the battle.”
  • A history enthusiast might say, “Cannons were a game-changer in medieval warfare.”

22. Sidearm

A sidearm refers to a small firearm that is carried on one’s person as a backup weapon. It is often used by military or law enforcement personnel.

  • For instance, a police officer might carry a sidearm in addition to their main duty weapon.
  • In a discussion about self-defense, someone might recommend, “It’s always good to have a reliable sidearm as a backup.”
  • A soldier might say, “I never leave my base without my trusty sidearm.”

23. Longrifle

A longrifle, also known as a Kentucky rifle, is a type of firearm with a long barrel that was popular in the American frontier during the 18th and 19th centuries. It is known for its accuracy and range.

  • For example, in a historical documentary, you might learn about the craftsmanship of the longrifle.
  • A collector of antique firearms might proudly display their Kentucky rifle and say, “This longrifle is a piece of American history.”
  • A reenactor might mention, “During the Revolutionary War, the longrifle played a significant role in the hands of skilled marksmen.”

24. Popper

In slang terms, a “popper” can refer to a small homemade weapon made by filling a soda can with explosive materials. It is an informal term used primarily in urban settings.

  • For instance, in a crime novel, a character might mention, “He made a popper out of a soda can to scare off his enemies.”
  • In a discussion about illegal weapons, someone might warn, “Be careful, homemade poppers can be extremely dangerous.”
  • A person sharing a personal story might say, “I remember finding a popper in the park when I was a kid. It scared me to death.”

25. Gats

The term “gats” is a slang term often used to refer to handguns. It is derived from the word “Gatling,” which is the name of an early type of machine gun.

  • For example, in a gangster movie, a character might say, “I always carry two gats for protection.”
  • A firearms enthusiast might discuss the different types of gats available in the market.
  • In a conversation about gun control, someone might argue, “Criminals will always find a way to get their hands on gats.”

26. Irons

This slang term is used to refer to firearms in general. It is derived from the term “iron,” which is a common nickname for a gun.

  • For example, a gang member might say, “I always keep my irons close by.”
  • In a conversation about self-defense, someone might mention, “It’s important to know how to handle your irons.”
  • A person discussing the Second Amendment might argue, “The right to bear irons is a fundamental aspect of our freedom.”

27. Smokepole

This slang term refers to a type of firearm that is loaded from the muzzle or front end of the barrel. It is often used to describe old-fashioned or antique firearms.

  • For instance, a historical reenactor might say, “I love using a smokepole during Civil War reenactments.”
  • In a discussion about hunting, someone might mention, “Using a smokepole adds an extra challenge to the hunt.”
  • A firearms enthusiast might show off their collection and say, “Check out this smokepole I recently acquired.”

28. Strap

This slang term is commonly used to refer to a firearm, especially a handgun. It is derived from the idea of strapping a gun to one’s body for easy access.

  • For example, a police officer might say, “I always carry my strap while on duty.”
  • In a conversation about personal safety, someone might advise, “Make sure you have a strap for self-defense.”
  • A character in a crime novel might say, “He reached for his strap and prepared for a shootout.”

29. Piece of iron

This slang term is used to describe a firearm, emphasizing its solid and metallic nature. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For instance, a gun enthusiast might say, “I just bought a new piece of iron for my collection.”
  • In a conversation about home defense, someone might ask, “Do you have a piece of iron to protect yourself?”
  • A person discussing gun laws might argue, “Every citizen has the right to own a piece of iron for self-defense.”

30. Burner

This slang term is used to refer to a firearm, particularly a handgun. It is derived from the idea that a gun can be used to “burn” or shoot someone.

  • For example, a gang member might say, “I always carry a burner for protection.”
  • In a discussion about crime, someone might mention, “The suspect was found with a burner in his possession.”
  • A character in a movie might say, “I’ll take care of him with my trusty burner.”

31. Lead thrower

This term is a slang for a firearm. It refers to a weapon that expels projectiles, typically made of lead, through the force of an explosion or combustion. “Lead thrower” is a colorful way to describe a gun.

  • For example, a character in a crime novel might say, “He pulled out his trusty lead thrower and fired a warning shot.”
  • In a conversation about self-defense, someone might mention, “I keep a lead thrower in my nightstand for protection.”
  • A gun enthusiast might discuss the history of firearms by saying, “The lead thrower revolutionized warfare.”

32. Piece of Heat

This is a slang term for a firearm. “Piece of heat” refers to a weapon that generates heat and explosive force to propel projectiles. It is often used in urban settings to describe a gun.

  • For instance, in a crime movie, a character might say, “I always carry a piece of heat for my own safety.”
  • In a discussion about gun control, someone might argue, “No one needs a piece of heat for self-defense.”
  • A person familiar with firearms might say, “It’s important to handle a piece of heat with care and respect.”

33. Smoke pole

This slang term refers to a type of firearm known as a muzzleloader. A “smoke pole” is a gun that is loaded from the muzzle, or the open end of the barrel, rather than from the breech. The term comes from the smoke that is produced when the gun is fired.

  • For example, in a historical reenactment, someone might say, “I’m using a smoke pole to recreate the experience of a Revolutionary War soldier.”
  • In a discussion about hunting, a person might mention, “I prefer using a smoke pole for a more traditional hunting experience.”
  • A gun collector might proudly display their smoke pole and say, “This muzzleloader is a fine example of early firearms technology.”

34. Thunderstick

This slang term is another way to refer to a gun. “Thunderstick” is a colorful and dramatic word choice to describe a firearm. It implies the power and force associated with the weapon.

  • For instance, in an action movie, a character might say, “Get ready to feel the wrath of my thunderstick!”
  • In a conversation about personal safety, someone might say, “I feel much safer knowing I have a thunderstick by my side.”
  • A gun enthusiast might discuss the evolution of firearms by saying, “From the early flintlock pistols to modern thundersticks, guns have come a long way.”

35. Blammy

This slang term is used to describe a firearm. “Blammy” is an onomatopoeic word that imitates the sound of a gunshot. It is a playful and informal way to refer to a gun.

  • For example, in a comic book, a character might say, “I whipped out my blammy and took down the bad guys.”
  • In a discussion about gun safety, someone might emphasize, “Always treat a blammy with utmost care and respect.”
  • A gun enthusiast might show off their collection and say, “Check out my blammies, each with its own unique history and character.”

36. Bang stick

A “bang stick” is a slang term for a harpoon, a long spear-like weapon used for fishing or hunting underwater creatures. It is typically powered by a firearm cartridge that propels the harpoon forward with force.

  • For example, a scuba diver might use a bang stick to hunt large fish underwater.
  • In a conversation about fishing gear, someone might say, “I always carry a bang stick with me when I go spearfishing.”
  • A hunter might share a story like, “I once took down a massive shark with just a bang stick.”

37. Iron piece

The term “iron piece” is a slang term for a gun. It refers to the metal construction of the weapon, highlighting its durability and strength.

  • For instance, a detective in a crime novel might say, “The suspect was armed with an iron piece.”
  • In a discussion about self-defense, someone might argue, “Having an iron piece can provide a sense of security.”
  • A gun enthusiast might proudly proclaim, “I own several iron pieces, each with its own unique features.”

38. Gatling

A “Gatling” is a slang term for a machine gun, specifically referring to the Gatling gun, a type of early rapid-fire weapon. It was first invented in the 19th century and featured multiple barrels that rotated to allow continuous firing.

  • For example, in a war movie, a soldier might shout, “Get to the Gatling!”
  • In a historical discussion, someone might say, “The Gatling revolutionized warfare with its rapid-fire capability.”
  • A military enthusiast might explain, “The Gatling was a precursor to modern machine guns.”

39. Rosy

The term “rosy” is a slang term for a knife. It is often used to describe a knife with a sharp, pointed blade.

  • For instance, a character in a crime novel might say, “He pulled out a rosy and threatened me.”
  • In a conversation about camping gear, someone might mention, “A good rosy is essential for outdoor survival.”
  • A knife collector might show off their collection and say, “Check out these beautiful rosies I’ve acquired over the years.”

40. Blickey

A “blickey” is a slang term for a semi-automatic pistol. It is typically used in urban settings and is associated with hip-hop culture.

  • For example, in a rap song, the lyrics might include, “I keep a blickey for protection.”
  • In a discussion about gun control, someone might argue, “Blickeys are too easily accessible and contribute to gun violence.”
  • A fan of hip-hop music might use the term casually and say, “I love the sound of a blickey in a beat.”

41. Blam Blam

This is a slang term for a firearm. It is often used to mimic the sound of a gun being fired.

  • For example, a character in a movie might say, “He pulled out his blam blam and started shooting.”
  • In a discussion about gun violence, someone might say, “We need stricter regulations to keep blam blams off the streets.”
  • A person talking about self-defense might say, “I always keep my blam blam close by in case of an emergency.”

42. Lead spitter

This slang term refers to a firearm, emphasizing its ability to shoot bullets or “spit” lead.

  • For instance, a gangster in a movie might say, “I’ll show them what happens when they mess with the lead spitter.”
  • In a conversation about different types of guns, someone might say, “The lead spitter is a classic choice for personal protection.”
  • A gun enthusiast might brag, “My collection includes some of the finest lead spitters ever made.”

43. Thunderer

This term is used to describe a firearm, emphasizing the loud noise it makes when fired.

  • For example, a character in a novel might say, “He drew his thunderer and fired a warning shot.”
  • In a discussion about gun control, someone might argue, “The use of thunderers in public places poses a serious safety risk.”
  • A person discussing historical firearms might say, “The thunderer was a popular choice among law enforcement officers in the late 19th century.”

44. Stick of Thunder

This slang term refers to a firearm, comparing it to a stick that produces thunder-like sounds when fired.

  • For instance, a character in a video game might say, “I need to find a stick of thunder to defeat the enemy.”
  • In a conversation about different types of guns, someone might say, “The stick of thunder is known for its powerful recoil.”
  • A gun collector might say, “I recently acquired a rare stick of thunder from the 1800s.”

45. Strapped

This term is used to indicate that someone is carrying a weapon, usually a firearm.

  • For example, a character in a movie might say, “I always make sure to stay strapped for protection.”
  • In a discussion about personal safety, someone might say, “In dangerous neighborhoods, it’s not uncommon to see people walking around strapped.”
  • A person talking about concealed carry laws might argue, “Law-abiding citizens should have the right to be strapped for self-defense.”

46. Toolie

Toolie is a slang term for a gun. It is often used in urban settings to refer to a firearm.

  • For example, in a crime movie, a character might say, “He pulled out his toolie and started shooting.”
  • A person discussing self-defense might mention, “Carrying a toolie can provide a sense of security.”
  • Another might warn, “Don’t mess with him, he’s known to carry a toolie.”

47. Pop pop

Pop pop is a slang term for the sound of gunshots. It is often used to describe the noise made by firearms.

  • For instance, in a news report, the journalist might say, “Witnesses reported hearing multiple pop pops.”
  • A person describing a dangerous situation might say, “I heard pop pops coming from the alley.”
  • Another might recount, “I was startled by the sudden pop pop outside my window.”

48. Steel piece

Steel piece is a slang term for a firearm. It refers to the fact that firearms are typically made of steel.

  • For example, in a conversation about personal protection, someone might say, “I always carry my steel piece with me.”
  • A gun enthusiast might comment, “I just bought a new steel piece for my collection.”
  • Another might mention, “The weight of a steel piece can be comforting in a dangerous situation.”

49. Bang bang

Bang bang is a slang term for gunfire. It is often used to describe the sound made by a gun when it is fired.

  • For instance, in a war movie, a character might yell, “Bang bang!” to imitate the sound of gunfire.
  • A person recounting a shooting incident might say, “I heard bang bang coming from the other room.”
  • Another might mimic the sound and say, “All I heard was bang bang, and then everything went quiet.”

50. Iron lady

Iron lady is a slang term for a gun. It is often used to refer to firearms, particularly in urban settings.

  • For example, in a crime novel, the detective might say, “The suspect was armed with an iron lady.”
  • A person discussing the power of firearms might comment, “An iron lady can level the playing field.”
  • Another might warn, “Don’t underestimate the danger of an iron lady in the wrong hands.”