Top 77 Slang For Went To – Meaning & Usage

Ever struggled to find the right words to describe where you’ve been? Look no further! Whether you’re a seasoned traveler or just someone who enjoys a good adventure, our team has put together a list of the coolest slang for “went to” that will have you expressing your journeys in style. Get ready to upgrade your vocabulary and impress your friends with these trendy phrases!

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1. Hit up

This phrase is used to indicate that someone went to a specific place or met up with someone. It can also imply that the visit was casual or unplanned.

  • For example, “I hit up the new coffee shop in town and tried their specialty drink.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s hit up the mall this weekend and do some shopping.”
  • Someone might mention, “I hit up my favorite pizza place for dinner last night.”

2. Checked out

This phrase is used to indicate that someone went to a place to see or experience it for themselves. It can also imply that the visit was for the purpose of evaluation or enjoyment.

  • For instance, “I checked out the new art exhibit at the museum and was blown away.”
  • A person might say, “I want to check out that new restaurant everyone is talking about.”
  • Someone might mention, “I checked out the local farmers market and bought some fresh produce.”

3. Dropped by

This phrase is used to indicate that someone made a short, impromptu visit to a place or person. It can also imply that the visit was casual or without a specific purpose.

  • For example, “I dropped by my friend’s house to say hello and catch up.”
  • A person might say, “I decided to drop by the office and see if anyone was available for a quick meeting.”
  • Someone might mention, “I dropped by the store to pick up a few things on my way home.”

4. Swung by

This phrase is used to indicate that someone made a quick visit to a place or person. It can also imply that the visit was spontaneous or unexpected.

  • For instance, “I swung by the library to return some books before heading home.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll swing by your place later to drop off the things I borrowed.”
  • Someone might mention, “I swung by the café to grab a coffee on my way to work.”

5. Popped in

This phrase is used to indicate that someone made a short visit to a place or person. It can also imply that the visit was casual or without a specific purpose.

  • For example, “I popped in to see if the store had the item I was looking for.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll pop in to say hello on my way home from work.”
  • Someone might mention, “I popped in at the party for a few minutes to say hi to everyone.”

6. Came by

This phrase is used to indicate that someone went to a particular place. It implies a casual or unplanned visit.

  • For example, “I came by your house earlier, but you weren’t home.”
  • In a conversation about meeting up, one person might say, “I’ll come by your office after work.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you come by the store and pick up some groceries on your way home?”

7. Rolled through

This slang phrase means to visit a place briefly or quickly. It suggests a casual or laid-back visit.

  • For instance, “I rolled through the party last night and said hi to a few friends.”
  • In a discussion about checking in on someone, one might say, “I’ll roll through your place tomorrow and see how you’re doing.”
  • A person might mention, “I rolled through the museum on my way home from work and saw a fascinating exhibit.”

8. Showed up

This slang term means to attend an event or be present at a certain location. It implies a sense of appearing or making an appearance.

  • For example, “I showed up to the party late, but I still had a great time.”
  • In a conversation about a meeting, one person might say, “Make sure to show up on time.”
  • Another might ask, “Did you show up to the concert last night? The band was amazing!”

9. Stepped by

This phrase is used to indicate that someone visited a place briefly or unexpectedly. It implies a casual or informal visit.

  • For instance, “I stepped by your office today to say hello.”
  • In a discussion about running errands, one person might say, “I’ll step by the post office and mail these letters for you.”
  • A person might mention, “I stepped by the park on my way home and enjoyed the sunset.”

10. Passed by

This slang phrase means to visit a place briefly or quickly. It suggests a casual or spontaneous visit.

  • For example, “I passed by your house earlier, but you weren’t home.”
  • In a conversation about grabbing coffee, one person might say, “I’ll pass by the café and pick up a latte for you.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you pass by the store and grab some snacks for the party?”

11. Cruised by

This phrase is used to indicate that someone made a casual visit to a place or person. It implies a relaxed and informal visit.

  • For example, “I cruised by my friend’s house to pick up my jacket.”
  • Someone might say, “I cruised by the store to grab some snacks.”
  • Another person might mention, “I cruised by the party to see who was there.”

12. Swung past

This expression suggests that someone made a quick stop at a location. It implies a short and temporary visit.

  • For instance, “I swung past the office to drop off some paperwork.”
  • A person might say, “I swung past the coffee shop to grab a latte.”
  • Another example could be, “I swung past the library to return some books.”

13. Came over

This phrase is used to indicate that someone went to another person’s residence. It implies going to someone’s house or apartment.

  • For example, “I came over to watch a movie at my friend’s place.”
  • Someone might say, “I came over for dinner at my sister’s house.”
  • Another person might mention, “I came over to study with my classmate.”

14. Went over

This expression suggests that someone went to a particular place or venue. It implies going to a specific destination.

  • For instance, “I went over to the museum to see the new exhibit.”
  • A person might say, “I went over to the park to meet my friends.”
  • Another example could be, “I went over to the mall to do some shopping.”

15. Flew over

This phrase implies that someone traveled by airplane to a specific destination. It suggests a journey by air.

  • For example, “I flew over to Europe for a vacation.”
  • Someone might say, “I flew over to attend a business conference.”
  • Another person might mention, “I flew over to visit my family in another state.”

16. Ran over

This phrase is used to describe going somewhere in a fast and hurried manner.

  • For example, “I ran over to the store to grab some milk before it closed.”
  • In a conversation about meeting up with friends, someone might say, “I’ll run over to your place after work.”
  • If someone is late for an appointment, they might apologize by saying, “Sorry I’m late, I ran over from the other side of town.”

17. Hopped over

This slang phrase is used to describe going somewhere in a light and effortless manner.

  • For instance, “I hopped over to the coffee shop for a quick pick-me-up.”
  • In a discussion about exploring a new city, a traveler might say, “I love how easy it is to hop over to different neighborhoods.”
  • If someone asks how you got to a nearby location, you could respond, “I just hopped over since it’s within walking distance.”

18. Drove over

This phrase is used to describe going somewhere using a car as the mode of transportation.

  • For example, “We drove over to the beach for a day of relaxation.”
  • In a conversation about commuting, someone might say, “I usually drive over to work, but sometimes I take public transportation.”
  • If someone is planning a road trip, they might ask, “Do you want to drive over to the mountains with me?”

19. Walked over

This slang phrase is used to describe going somewhere on foot, without the use of any other mode of transportation.

  • For instance, “I walked over to the park to enjoy the nice weather.”
  • In a discussion about exercise, a fitness enthusiast might say, “I try to walk over to places instead of driving whenever possible.”
  • If someone asks how you got to a nearby location, you could respond, “I just walked over since it’s so close.”

20. Jogged over

This phrase is used to describe going somewhere by running at a steady and moderate speed.

  • For example, “I jogged over to the gym to get in a quick workout.”
  • In a conversation about staying active, someone might say, “I like to jog over to the park and back as part of my daily routine.”
  • If someone asks how you got to a nearby location, you could respond, “I just jogged over to save time and get some exercise.”

21. Stopped by

This phrase is used to describe visiting someone or somewhere briefly, often without prior notice. It implies a casual or spontaneous visit.

  • For example, “I stopped by my friend’s house on my way home from work.”
  • A person might say, “I was in the neighborhood, so I thought I’d stop by and say hello.”
  • Someone might mention, “I stopped by the store to pick up some groceries.”

22. Visited

This is a straightforward term for going to a place or seeing someone. It implies a purposeful visit or trip.

  • For instance, “I visited my grandparents over the weekend.”
  • A person might say, “I’m planning to visit Paris next year.”
  • Someone might mention, “I visited the museum and saw some amazing artwork.”

23. Went to

This is a simple and common phrase used to indicate going to a specific place or event.

  • For example, “I went to the movies with my friends last night.”
  • A person might say, “I went to the party and had a great time.”
  • Someone might mention, “I went to the beach to relax and soak up the sun.”

24. Dropped in

This phrase means to visit someone or somewhere briefly and unexpectedly. It implies a spontaneous visit without prior arrangement.

  • For instance, “I dropped in on my sister to surprise her with a gift.”
  • A person might say, “I was passing by, so I thought I’d drop in and say hi.”
  • Someone might mention, “I dropped in at the office to pick up some documents.”

25. Came around

This term is used to describe visiting someone or somewhere, often without prior notice. It implies a casual or spontaneous visit.

  • For example, “I came around your place to see if you were home.”
  • A person might say, “I came around the office to drop off some paperwork.”
  • Someone might mention, “I swung by the party to say hello to some friends.”

26. Went around

This phrase is used to describe the act of going to different locations or taking a roundabout route.

  • For example, “During my vacation, I went around the city to explore all the tourist attractions.”
  • A person might say, “I went around the neighborhood to deliver flyers for the event.”
  • Someone might ask, “Did you go around and talk to all the guests at the party?”

27. Went down

This phrase is used to describe an event or situation that took place.

  • For instance, “Last night, a big fight went down at the bar.”
  • A person might say, “The concert was amazing! It was one of the best performances I’ve ever seen. You should have been there when it went down.”
  • Someone might ask, “What went down at the meeting? Did they make any important decisions?”

28. Went up

This phrase is used to describe a situation where something has gone or increased in a vertical direction.

  • For example, “The price of gas went up overnight.”
  • A person might say, “The temperature went up significantly during the summer.”
  • Someone might ask, “Did the stock market go up today?”

29. Went out

This phrase is used to describe the act of going out for social activities or going on a date.

  • For instance, “I went out with my friends last night and had a great time.”
  • A person might say, “I haven’t gone out in a while. Let’s plan a night out this weekend.”
  • Someone might ask, “Are you going out with anyone? I heard you’re single now.”

30. Went in

This phrase is used to describe the act of entering a place or going inside a building.

  • For example, “I went in the store to buy some groceries.”
  • A person might say, “I went in the office to talk to my boss about the project.”
  • Someone might ask, “Did you see who went in the house? I heard a noise coming from there.”

31. Went off

This phrase is often used to describe someone leaving a place suddenly or without warning.

  • For example, “He went off without saying goodbye.”
  • In a conversation about a party, someone might say, “The music was so loud that I couldn’t hear when she went off.”
  • Another usage might be, “I saw him arguing with his boss, and then he just went off.”

32. Went away

This phrase simply means to leave or depart from a location.

  • For instance, “She went away on vacation for two weeks.”
  • In a discussion about a relationship, someone might say, “He went away without giving any explanation.”
  • Another usage might be, “I miss him since he went away.”

33. Went back

This phrase indicates a return to a previous place or condition.

  • For example, “He went back to his hometown after living abroad for many years.”
  • In a conversation about a decision, someone might say, “I regret that I went back to my old job.”
  • Another usage might be, “She went back to her old habits after promising to change.”

34. Went forward

This phrase suggests moving ahead or making progress in a situation or endeavor.

  • For instance, “After the setback, we went forward with our plan.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “I went forward and pursued my passion despite the challenges.”
  • Another usage might be, “The team went forward with the project despite the initial doubts.”

35. Went ahead

This phrase means to proceed or continue with an action or plan.

  • For example, “She went ahead with the presentation even though she was nervous.”
  • In a conversation about a decision, someone might say, “I went ahead and booked the tickets.”
  • Another usage might be, “He went ahead and started the project without waiting for approval.”

36. Went home

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is returning to their home or place of residence. It can be used in various contexts and situations.

  • For example, after a long day at work, someone might say, “I’m exhausted, I’m just going to go home and relax.”
  • If someone is feeling homesick while traveling, they might say, “I miss my family, I can’t wait to go home.”
  • In a conversation about weekend plans, someone might mention, “I’m planning to go home and visit my parents.”

37. Went abroad

This phrase is used to indicate that someone has traveled to a foreign country. It is often used to describe the act of going on an international trip.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ve always wanted to go abroad and experience different cultures.”
  • When discussing their recent vacation, someone might mention, “I went abroad and visited several European countries.”
  • In a conversation about studying abroad, a student might say, “I’m planning to go abroad next semester and study in Japan.”

38. Went on

This phrase is used to indicate that someone has participated in or attended a specific event or activity. It can refer to a wide range of situations.

  • For example, if someone attended a concert, they might say, “I went on Friday and it was an amazing show.”
  • When discussing a hiking trip, someone might mention, “We went on a challenging hike and reached the summit.”
  • In a conversation about a job interview, someone might say, “I went on the interview, but I’m not sure how it went.”

39. Went for

This phrase is used to indicate that someone has made a decision or choice regarding a specific situation or opportunity. It can refer to various scenarios.

  • For instance, if someone chooses a particular item from a menu, they might say, “I went for the steak, it looked delicious.”
  • When discussing college applications, a student might mention, “I went for a liberal arts major because it aligns with my interests.”
  • In a conversation about job offers, someone might say, “I went for the position with the higher salary.”

40. Went with

This phrase is used to indicate that someone has chosen or decided on a specific option or course of action. It can refer to a variety of choices.

  • For example, if someone selects a particular outfit, they might say, “I went with the blue dress, it matches my shoes.”
  • When discussing a group activity, someone might mention, “We went with the movie option for our weekend plans.”
  • In a conversation about food preferences, someone might say, “I went with the vegetarian option because I don’t eat meat.”

41. Went after

This phrase is used to indicate that someone followed or pursued a person or thing. It suggests a sense of determination or a strong desire to reach a goal.

  • For example, “He went after his dreams and became a successful musician.”
  • In a sports context, one might say, “The team went after the championship and won.”
  • Someone might use this phrase to describe a job search, saying, “She went after her dream job and got hired.”

42. Stepped in

This expression is used to convey the act of entering a place or situation. It implies a casual or relaxed manner of arrival.

  • For instance, “He stepped into the party and immediately started socializing.”
  • In a conversation about a meeting, one might say, “I stepped into the conference room and introduced myself.”
  • Someone might use this phrase to describe joining a conversation, saying, “I stepped in and shared my opinion.”

43. Made it to

This phrase is used to indicate successful arrival at a destination or achievement of a goal. It implies overcoming obstacles or challenges.

  • For example, “After a long journey, they finally made it to their destination.”
  • In a discussion about a milestone, one might say, “She made it to her 100th blog post.”
  • Someone might use this phrase to describe a personal accomplishment, saying, “I made it to the top of the mountain.”

44. Arrived at

This expression is used to convey the act of reaching a specific location or destination. It suggests a sense of completion or accomplishment.

  • For instance, “They arrived at the airport just in time for their flight.”
  • In a conversation about a road trip, one might say, “We arrived at our hotel after a long drive.”
  • Someone might use this phrase to describe a visit to a friend, saying, “I arrived at her house and knocked on the door.”

45. Went by

This phrase is used to indicate a visit to a place or person. It implies a casual or spontaneous action.

  • For example, “They went by their friend’s house to say hello.”
  • In a discussion about running errands, one might say, “I went by the grocery store to pick up some milk.”
  • Someone might use this phrase to describe a quick stop, saying, “I went by the office to drop off some paperwork.”

46. Came in

This phrase is used to indicate that someone arrived at a specific location or event. It implies that the person entered a place or joined a group.

  • For example, “I came in just in time for the meeting.”
  • Someone might say, “He came in late to the party, but he still had a great time.”
  • Another example could be, “She came in wearing a beautiful dress and caught everyone’s attention.”

47. Rolled in

This slang phrase means to arrive at a place or event in a casual or relaxed manner. It suggests a laid-back or nonchalant arrival.

  • For instance, “He rolled in to the party with a big smile on his face.”
  • Someone might say, “We rolled in late to the concert, but we still managed to find good seats.”
  • Another example could be, “They rolled in to the restaurant and immediately ordered their favorite dishes.”

48. Came over to

This phrase is used to indicate that someone visited another person or went to their location. It implies a purposeful visit or a desire to spend time with someone.

  • For example, “She came over to my house to help me with my project.”
  • Someone might say, “He came over to my office to discuss the new proposal.”
  • Another example could be, “They came over to our neighborhood to check out the new park.”

49. Showed up at

This slang phrase means to arrive at a specific location or event. It implies that the person unexpectedly or surprisingly arrived at the place or event.

  • For instance, “He showed up at the party uninvited.”
  • Someone might say, “She showed up at the meeting, even though she wasn’t scheduled to attend.”
  • Another example could be, “They showed up at the concert last minute and managed to get tickets.”

50. Came through

This phrase is used to indicate that someone arrived at a specific location or event. It suggests that the person fulfilled a promise or expectation by showing up.

  • For example, “He came through and attended the charity event.”
  • Someone might say, “She came through and joined us for dinner despite her busy schedule.”
  • Another example could be, “They came through and supported our team at the championship game.”

51. Came around to

This phrase is used when someone has a change of heart or starts to understand and accept something they previously did not.

  • For example, “After hearing her explanation, I came around to her point of view.”
  • In a discussion about trying new foods, someone might say, “I used to hate sushi, but I came around to it after trying a different roll.”
  • A person discussing their political beliefs might say, “I used to be against gun control, but recent events made me come around to the idea.”

52. Came up to

This phrase is used to describe physically moving towards a specific place or person.

  • For instance, “I saw him across the room and came up to say hello.”
  • In a story about a surprise visit, someone might say, “I came up to her door and knocked before she even knew I was there.”
  • A person describing a memorable encounter might say, “I came up to the stage after the concert and got the lead singer’s autograph.”

53. Came down to

This phrase is used to describe a situation where a final decision or outcome is based on a specific factor or factors.

  • For example, “The game came down to the final shot, and he made it.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult choice, someone might say, “In the end, it came down to what would make me happiest.”
  • A person describing a competition might say, “The race came down to a photo finish, with the winner determined by a fraction of a second.”

54. Came in to

This phrase is used to describe starting or joining a particular activity or job.

  • For instance, “She came in to help with the project after hearing about it.”
  • In a story about a new employee, someone might say, “He came in to work early on his first day to make a good impression.”
  • A person describing a team effort might say, “Everyone came in to contribute their skills and make the event a success.”

55. Came out to

This phrase is used when someone reveals their true self or shares personal information with others.

  • For example, “She came out to her family as gay and received their full support.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “I finally came out to my friends about my struggles with anxiety.”
  • A person describing a confession might say, “He came out to his partner about his past mistakes and asked for forgiveness.”

56. Came along to

This phrase is used to describe someone who went to a particular place or event with someone else. It implies that the person joined in or accompanied someone to the destination.

  • For example, “I came along to the party with my friends.”
  • A person might say, “I came along to the concert with my sister.”
  • In a group outing, someone might ask, “Who wants to come along to the movies with me?”

57. Came back to

This phrase indicates that someone returned to a place or situation. It implies going back to a previous location or resuming a previous activity.

  • For instance, “I came back to my hometown after years of living abroad.”
  • A person might say, “I came back to work after my vacation.”
  • If someone left a meeting and returned later, they might say, “I came back to the meeting after taking a break.”

58. Came forward to

This phrase suggests that someone volunteered or took the initiative to do something. It implies a sense of responsibility or willingness to take action.

  • For example, “He came forward to offer his assistance.”
  • A person might say, “I came forward to share my ideas with the team.”
  • If someone took the lead in a project, they might say, “I came forward to take charge of the task.”

59. Came off to

This phrase describes the impression or perception someone gives to others. It implies how someone appears or is perceived by others.

  • For instance, “She came off to me as confident and friendly.”
  • A person might say, “He came off to the interviewer as knowledgeable and well-prepared.”
  • If someone’s behavior was misunderstood, they might say, “I didn’t mean to come off to you as rude.”

60. Came up with

This phrase indicates that someone generated an idea or solution. It implies the act of thinking creatively or finding a solution to a problem.

  • For example, “She came up with a brilliant plan to solve the issue.”
  • A person might say, “I came up with a new recipe for dinner.”
  • If someone proposed a unique suggestion, they might say, “I came up with an idea for the project.”

61. Came in with

This phrase is used to indicate that someone arrived or entered a place accompanied by someone or something else.

  • For example, “She came in with her friends to the party.”
  • In a conversation about a group outing, one might say, “We all came in with our significant others.”
  • Someone might mention, “He came in with a big smile on his face.”

62. Came out with

This phrase is used to indicate that someone or something was released or produced.

  • For instance, “The band came out with a new album last week.”
  • In a discussion about movies, someone might say, “The director came out with a critically acclaimed film.”
  • A person might mention, “The company came out with a new product line.”

63. Came along with

This phrase is used to indicate that someone or something was accompanied by someone or something else.

  • For example, “She came along with her sister to the party.”
  • In a conversation about a group trip, someone might say, “I came along with my friends.”
  • A person might mention, “He came along with his dog for the walk.”

64. Came back with

This phrase is used to indicate that someone returned from a place or situation with someone or something else.

  • For instance, “She came back with a souvenir from her vacation.”
  • In a discussion about shopping, someone might say, “I came back with a new dress.”
  • A person might mention, “He came back with a great idea.”

65. Came through with

This phrase is used to indicate that someone delivered or provided something as promised or expected.

  • For example, “She came through with the money she owed me.”
  • In a conversation about a favor, someone might say, “He came through with the help I needed.”
  • A person might mention, “They came through with the promised results.”

66. Dipped into

This phrase is used to indicate that someone went to a place for a short period of time or made a quick stop.

  • For example, “I just dipped into the store to grab a snack.”
  • Someone might say, “I dipped into the party for a few minutes to say hello.”
  • Another person might mention, “I dipped into the café to grab a coffee on my way to work.”

67. Popped over

This phrase is used when someone went to a place in a casual or informal manner, often without much planning or effort.

  • For instance, “I just popped over to my friend’s house to borrow a book.”
  • A person might say, “I popped over to the store to grab some milk.”
  • Another might mention, “I popped over to the park to take a quick walk.”

68. Ran by

This phrase is used to indicate that someone went to a place quickly or briefly, often to drop something off or check on something.

  • For example, “I ran by the post office to mail a package.”
  • Someone might say, “I ran by my friend’s house to drop off their keys.”
  • Another person might mention, “I ran by the store to pick up some groceries.”

69. Rolled up

This phrase is used to indicate that someone arrived at a place, often with a sense of style or confidence.

  • For instance, “He rolled up to the party in a fancy sports car.”
  • A person might say, “I rolled up to the meeting on time and prepared.”
  • Another might mention, “She rolled up to the event in a stunning evening gown.”

70. Bounced to

This phrase is used to indicate that someone went to a place with excitement or enthusiasm.

  • For example, “I bounced to the concert last night and had a great time.”
  • Someone might say, “Let’s bounce to the new restaurant and try their food.”
  • Another person might mention, “They bounced to the party and danced all night.”

71. Cruised to

This phrase implies a relaxed and effortless journey to a specific place.

  • For example, “We cruised to the beach for a day of relaxation.”
  • Someone might say, “I cruised to the store to pick up some groceries.”
  • A traveler might share, “We cruised to Europe for our summer vacation.”

72. Jetted off to

This phrase suggests traveling by airplane to a specific place, usually with a sense of excitement or urgency.

  • For instance, “She jetted off to Paris for a fashion show.”
  • Someone might say, “I jetted off to New York for a business meeting.”
  • A traveler might share, “We jetted off to the Caribbean for a tropical getaway.”

73. Hopped over to

This phrase implies a short and easy journey to a nearby place, often used when referring to a quick visit or errand.

  • For example, “I hopped over to my neighbor’s house to borrow some sugar.”
  • Someone might say, “I hopped over to the coffee shop to grab a latte.”
  • A person might share, “I hopped over to the park to catch some fresh air.”

74. Stepped into

This phrase suggests walking into a specific place or location, often used to indicate physically entering a building or establishment.

  • For instance, “He stepped into the restaurant and was immediately greeted by the host.”
  • Someone might say, “I stepped into the office to talk to my boss.”
  • A person might share, “I stepped into the store to browse for some new clothes.”

75. Flew over to

This phrase indicates traveling by airplane to a faraway place, often used when referring to a long-distance journey or trip.

  • For example, “She flew over to Japan to visit her family.”
  • Someone might say, “I flew over to California for a business conference.”
  • A traveler might share, “We flew over to Australia for a once-in-a-lifetime adventure.”

76. Cruised over to

This phrase is used to describe going to a place in a relaxed and leisurely manner. It implies a sense of ease and enjoyment in the visit.

  • For example, “After work, I cruised over to my friend’s house to hang out.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s cruise over to the beach and catch the sunset.”
  • Another might mention, “I cruised over to the mall to do some shopping.”

77. Headed to

This slang phrase is a simple way to express the action of going to a specific destination or location. It implies a sense of purpose or direction in the movement.

  • For instance, “I’m headed to the grocery store to pick up some ingredients.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s grab our jackets and head to the park.”
  • Another might mention, “I’m headed to the gym to get in a workout.”
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