Top 11 Slang For Were – Meaning & Usage

“Slang For Were” may sound mysterious at first, but fear not! We’ve got you covered. Our team has scoured the depths of modern language to bring you the most up-to-date and trendy slang terms for “were”. Get ready to level up your linguistic game and impress your friends with these cool and hip expressions. Let’s dive in and explore the world of slang for “were” together!

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1. Wuz

This is a slang term for “was” and is often used in informal conversations or text messages. It is a contraction of the word “was” and is used to indicate the past tense of “to be”.

  • For example, someone might say, “I wuz at the party last night.”
  • In a text message, a person might write, “Wuz wondering if you’re free tonight?”
  • A friend might ask, “Where wuz you last night?”

2. Weren’t

This is a contraction of the words “were” and “not” and is used to indicate the negative form of “were”. It is often used in casual speech or writing to express that something did not happen or was not true in the past.

  • For instance, someone might say, “We weren’t able to go to the concert.”
  • In a conversation, a person might ask, “You weren’t at the meeting yesterday, were you?”
  • A friend might comment, “I thought you weren’t coming to the party.”

3. Wuzn’t

This is a contraction of the words “was” and “not” and is used to indicate the negative form of “was”. It is a slang term and is often used in informal conversations or text messages to express that something was not true or did not happen in the past.

  • For example, someone might say, “I wuzn’t expecting that to happen.”
  • In a text message, a person might write, “Wuzn’t able to make it to the movie.”
  • A friend might comment, “I wuzn’t sure if you were serious about quitting your job.”

4. Wuzza

This is a slang term derived from the phrase “What’s up” and is often used as a greeting or to ask someone how they are doing. It is a casual and informal way to initiate a conversation or check in with someone.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Hey, wuzza?” as a way to say hello.
  • In a text message, a person might write, “Wuzza? Haven’t heard from you in a while.”
  • A friend might ask, “Wuzza with you? Anything new happening?”

5. Where it’s at

This phrase is used to refer to the best or most happening location or situation. It is often used to express where the most exciting or desirable things are happening.

  • For example, someone might say, “The party last night was where it’s at.”
  • In a conversation, a person might comment, “That new restaurant downtown is where it’s at for delicious food.”
  • A friend might ask, “Where it’s at tonight? I’m looking for something fun to do.”

6. We were

This is a contraction of “we” and “were” used to indicate past tense. It is commonly used in informal speech and writing.

  • For example, “We were at the party last night.”
  • A person might say, “We were going to go to the beach, but it started raining.”
  • In a conversation about past experiences, someone might mention, “We were so young back then.”

7. We’d been

This is a contraction of “we” and “had been” used to indicate a past action that occurred before another past action. It is often used in casual conversations.

  • For instance, “We’d been dating for three years before we got married.”
  • A person might say, “We’d been working on the project all night before we finally finished.”
  • In a discussion about a trip, someone might mention, “We’d been planning the vacation for months before we actually went.”

8. We’d

This is a contraction of “we” and “had” used to indicate a past action or possession. It is commonly used in spoken and written English.

  • For example, “We’d already eaten dinner when you called.”
  • A person might say, “We’d been friends since childhood.”
  • In a conversation about a missed opportunity, someone might mention, “We’d had the chance to travel, but we didn’t take it.”

9. We’d have

This is a contraction of “we” and “would have” used to indicate a hypothetical or unrealized action in the past. It is often used in conditional statements.

  • For instance, “We’d have gone to the concert if we had bought tickets.”
  • A person might say, “We’d have finished the project on time if we hadn’t encountered any issues.”
  • In a discussion about regrets, someone might mention, “We’d have made different choices if we knew then what we know now.”

10. We’d’ve

This is a contraction of “we” and “would have” used to indicate a hypothetical or unrealized action in the past. It is a more informal and colloquial form.

  • For example, “We’d’ve loved to join you, but we already had plans.”
  • A person might say, “We’d’ve been there on time if there hadn’t been traffic.”
  • In a conversation about missed opportunities, someone might mention, “We’d’ve taken the job offer if the salary had been higher.”

11. We’d’ve been

This is a contraction of “we would have been.” It is often used in informal conversation or writing to express a hypothetical situation or regret about a past event.

  • For example, “If we’d’ve been more careful, we wouldn’t have gotten caught.”
  • In a discussion about missed opportunities, someone might say, “We’d’ve been great together if the timing had been right.”
  • A person reflecting on their past choices might say, “I wish I’d’ve been more adventurous when I was younger.”
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