Top 38 Slang For What’S Up – Meaning & Usage

What’s up? It’s a phrase we use every day to greet our friends and catch up on the latest happenings. But did you know that there are countless slang phrases out there that can add some flavor to your “what’s up” game? We’ve done the research and put together a list of the top slang for what’s up that will take your conversations to the next level. So, if you’re ready to impress your friends with your hip vocabulary, keep reading!

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1. Sup

This is a shortened version of “What’s up?” and is commonly used as a casual greeting or to ask someone how they’re doing. It’s often used between friends or acquaintances.

  • For example, you might say, “Sup, dude?” to greet a friend you haven’t seen in a while.
  • In a text conversation, someone might ask, “Sup with you?” to check in on the other person.
  • If someone asks, “Sup?”, a common response might be, “Not much, just chilling.”

2. What’s good?

This phrase is another way to ask someone what’s going on or what they’re up to. It can also be used to inquire about someone’s well-being.

  • For instance, you might say, “Hey, what’s good?” when you see a friend.
  • If someone asks, “What’s good?”, a response could be, “Just enjoying the weekend, how about you?”
  • In a casual conversation, you might use this phrase to ask, “So, what’s good with you lately?”

3. What’s crackin’?

This phrase is a more informal way of asking what’s going on or what someone is up to. It’s often used among friends or in relaxed settings.

  • For example, you might greet a friend with, “Hey, what’s crackin’?”
  • If someone asks, “What’s crackin’?”, a response could be, “Not much, just hanging out.”
  • In a social gathering, you might use this phrase to ask, “So, what’s crackin’ tonight?”

4. What’s the haps?

This phrase is a playful and abbreviated way to ask what’s going on or what’s happening. It’s often used in casual conversations or among friends.

  • For instance, you might say, “Hey, what’s the haps?” to check in with someone.
  • If someone asks, “What’s the haps?”, a response could be, “Not much, just enjoying the day.”
  • In a group setting, you might use this phrase to ask, “So, what’s the haps with everyone?”

5. What’s been good?

This phrase is a variation of “What’s good?” and is used to ask what someone has been up to or what has been happening in their life.

  • For example, you might say, “Hey, what’s been good with you?” to catch up with a friend.
  • If someone asks, “What’s been good?”, a response could be, “Just working and spending time with family.”
  • In a conversation about recent activities, you might use this phrase to ask, “So, what’s been good in your life lately?”

6. How’s it going?

This is a casual greeting used to ask someone about their current state or well-being. It can also be used as a way to start a conversation.

  • For example, you might say, “Hey, John! How’s it going?”
  • In a friendly conversation, someone might respond, “It’s going great, thanks! How about you?”
  • Another person might reply, “Not too bad. Just taking it one day at a time.”

7. How’s everything?

This is a variation of “How’s it going?” that asks about someone’s overall situation or circumstances. It can be used to inquire about various aspects of their life.

  • For instance, you could say, “Hey, Sarah! How’s everything?”
  • In a conversation with a friend, someone might answer, “Everything’s good. Work’s busy, but life’s great.”
  • Another person might respond, “Eh, could be better. Dealing with some family stuff, but overall, things are okay.”

8. What’s the story?

This phrase is used to ask someone for an update on what’s going on in their life or to inquire about a specific situation or event.

  • For example, you might say, “Hey, Mike! What’s the story?”
  • In a conversation with a colleague, someone might reply, “Not much. Just working on this project and trying to meet the deadline.”
  • Another person might say, “Well, the story is that I finally booked that vacation I’ve been dreaming about!”

9. What’s the latest?

This question is used to ask someone about the most recent or current happenings or developments in their life.

  • For instance, you could say, “Hey, Lisa! What’s the latest?”
  • In a conversation with a sibling, someone might answer, “Oh, you know, same old same old. Just working and hanging out.”
  • Another person might respond, “Well, the latest is that I got a promotion at work! I’m really excited about it.”

10. What’s cookin’?

This is a casual and informal way to ask someone what’s going on or what they’re up to.

  • For example, you might say, “Hey, Tom! What’s cookin’?”
  • In a conversation with a friend, someone might reply, “Not much. Just relaxing and enjoying some time off.”
  • Another person might say, “Well, what’s cookin’ is that I’m planning a surprise party for my sister. It’s going to be a blast!”

11. What’s the word?

This phrase is used to ask someone what is happening or to inquire about the latest news or gossip.

  • For example, a person might ask their friend, “Hey, what’s the word with that new restaurant opening?”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “So, what’s the word on the street?”
  • If someone is out of the loop, they might ask, “Okay, what’s the word? I feel like I’m missing something.”

12. What’s new, buttercup?

This phrase is a playful way of asking someone what is new or what they have been up to recently.

  • For instance, a person might greet their friend by saying, “Hey, buttercup! What’s new?”
  • In a text message, someone might ask, “So, what’s new, buttercup? Any exciting updates?”
  • If someone wants to catch up with a friend, they might say, “Hey, let’s grab coffee and chat. I want to know what’s new, buttercup.”

13. How are you?

This is a common greeting used to ask someone about their well-being or current state.

  • For example, a person might ask their friend, “Hey, how are you? It’s been a while.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “So, how are you? Anything exciting happening?”
  • If someone wants to show genuine concern, they might ask, “Hey, I heard you had a rough day. How are you holding up?”

14. How do you do?

This is a formal greeting used to ask someone about their well-being or current state. It is often used in more formal or professional settings.

  • For instance, when meeting someone for the first time, a person might say, “How do you do? I’m [name].”
  • In a business meeting, someone might greet their colleagues by saying, “Good morning, everyone. How do you do?”
  • If someone wants to make a good impression, they might ask, “How do you do? I hope you’re having a great day.”

15. What’s happening?

This phrase is used to ask someone what is currently happening or what is going on in their life.

  • For example, a person might ask their friend, “Hey, what’s happening this weekend? Any plans?”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “So, what’s happening in the world of sports?”
  • If someone wants to catch up with a friend, they might ask, “Hey, it’s been a while. What’s happening in your life?”

16. How’s your day going?

This phrase is a casual way to inquire about how someone’s day is going.

  • For example, you might ask a friend, “Hey, how’s your day going?”
  • When meeting someone new, you could ask, “So, how’s your day going so far?”
  • In a text conversation, you might start with, “Hey! Just wanted to check in, how’s your day going?”

17. Hey

This is a simple and casual way to say hello or get someone’s attention.

  • For instance, you could greet a friend with a simple “Hey!”
  • When entering a room, you might say, “Hey, everyone!”
  • In a text message, you could start with a friendly “Hey, what’s up?”

18. Yo

This is a slang term used as a casual greeting or to get someone’s attention.

  • For example, you might say “Yo!” to a friend you see on the street.
  • When trying to get someone’s attention, you could say, “Yo, listen up!”
  • In a text message, you might start with a quick “Yo, what’s going on?”

19. Howdy

This is a colloquial way to say hello, often associated with the Southern United States.

  • For instance, you might greet someone with a friendly “Howdy!”
  • When meeting someone new, you could say, “Howdy, nice to meet you.”
  • In a more formal setting, you might still use “Howdy” as a way to add a touch of friendliness to your greeting.
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20. What’s crackin’

This phrase is a slang way to ask someone what they’re up to or what’s happening in their life.

  • For example, you might greet a friend with “Hey, what’s crackin’?”
  • When catching up with someone, you could ask, “So, what’s crackin’ in your world?”
  • In a text conversation, you might start with “Yo, what’s crackin’ with you?”

21. What’s good

This phrase is a casual way of asking someone what is happening or how they are doing. It is often used to greet someone or start a conversation.

  • For example, you might say, “Hey, what’s good?” to a friend you haven’t seen in a while.
  • When meeting up with someone, you could ask, “So, what’s good with you?”
  • In a text message, you might send “Hey, what’s good?” as a way to check in on someone.

22. What’s happening

Similar to “What’s good,” this phrase is used to ask someone what is currently happening or how they are doing. It is a casual way to start a conversation or check in on someone.

  • For instance, you might say, “Hey, what’s happening?” to a friend you run into unexpectedly.
  • When catching up with someone, you could ask, “So, what’s happening in your life?”
  • In a casual conversation, you might say, “I haven’t seen you in a while. What’s happening?”

23. What’s the word

This phrase is used to ask someone if there is any new or interesting information they have to share. It is a way to inquire about recent events or updates.

  • For example, you might say, “Hey, what’s the word?” to a friend you haven’t talked to in a while.
  • When catching up with someone, you could ask, “So, what’s the word on your end?”
  • In a group chat, you might send “What’s the word, everyone?” to see if anyone has any updates to share.
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24. What’s the scoop

This phrase is used to ask someone if there is any interesting or important information they have to share. It is a way to inquire about the latest news or gossip.

  • For instance, you might say, “Hey, what’s the scoop?” to a friend who always has the inside information.
  • When catching up with someone, you could ask, “So, what’s the scoop around here?”
  • In a casual conversation, you might say, “I heard there’s some juicy gossip. What’s the scoop?”

25. What’s poppin’

This phrase is a slang expression used to ask someone what is happening or what is going on. It is often used in a casual or energetic manner.

  • For example, you might say, “Hey, what’s poppin’?” to a friend you see at a party.
  • When catching up with someone, you could ask, “So, what’s poppin’ in your life?”
  • In a text message, you might send “What’s poppin’?” as a way to see if someone is available to hang out.

26. How’s it going

This phrase is a casual way to ask someone how they are or how things are in their life. It is often used as a greeting or as a way to start a conversation.

  • For example, you might say, “Hey, John! How’s it going?”
  • In a text message, you could ask, “Hi, Sarah! How’s it going with your new job?”
  • A friend might respond with, “It’s going great! I love my new job.”

27. How’s things

Similar to “How’s it going,” this phrase is another casual way to ask how someone is or how things are in their life. It is often used as a greeting or as a way to start a conversation.

  • For instance, you could say, “Hey, Lisa! How’s things?”
  • In a phone call, you might ask, “Hi, Mark! How’s things with your family?”
  • A colleague might reply, “Things are good. We’re busy with a new project.”

28. How’s life

This phrase is a more specific way to ask someone how they are doing in their overall life. It is often used as a greeting or as a way to start a conversation.

  • For example, you could say, “Hey, Mike! How’s life treating you?”
  • In a text message, you might ask, “Hi, Emily! How’s life been since we last caught up?”
  • A family member might respond with, “Life’s been good. I’ve been enjoying some quality time with loved ones.”

29. What’s new

This phrase is used to ask someone if there is anything new or exciting happening in their life. It is often used as a greeting or as a way to start a conversation.

  • For instance, you could say, “Hey, Alex! What’s new with you?”
  • In a phone call, you might ask, “Hi, Jessica! What’s new in your world?”
  • A friend might reply, “Not much. Just working and enjoying some downtime.”

30. What’s the haps

This phrase is a more informal way to ask someone what is happening or what is going on in their life. It is often used among friends or in casual conversations.

  • For example, you could say, “Hey, Tom! What’s the haps?”
  • In a text message, you might ask, “Hi, Sarah! What’s the haps this weekend?”
  • A friend might respond with, “Not much. Just hanging out and catching up on some TV shows.”

31. What’s shakin’

This phrase is a casual way of asking what is currently happening or what someone is up to.

  • For example, a friend might ask, “Hey, what’s shakin’?”
  • Someone might respond, “Not much, just hanging out at home.”
  • Another person might say, “I just got back from a run, so my legs are shakin’ a bit.”

32. What’s the story

This phrase is used to inquire about the latest news or information on a particular situation or topic.

  • For instance, someone might ask, “What’s the story with that new restaurant?”
  • A friend might say, “I heard they have amazing food, but the service is slow.”
  • Another person might respond, “I haven’t been there yet, but I’ll let you know when I do.”

33. What’s the score

This phrase is often used in sports to ask about the current score or result of a game. It can also be used more generally to inquire about the latest update or progress on a particular situation.

  • For example, during a basketball game, someone might ask, “What’s the score?”
  • A friend might say, “We’re winning by 10 points.”
  • In a work setting, someone might ask, “What’s the score on that project?” to inquire about its progress.
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34. What’s the vibe

This phrase is used to ask about the overall atmosphere or feeling of a situation or environment.

  • For instance, someone might ask, “What’s the vibe at the party?”
  • A friend might respond, “It’s really lively and energetic.”
  • Another person might say, “It’s more relaxed and chill.”

35. What’s the sitch

This phrase is a slangy way of asking about the current situation or plan.

  • For example, a friend might ask, “What’s the sitch for tonight?”
  • Someone might respond, “We’re meeting at the park for a picnic.”
  • Another person might say, “I’m not sure yet, let me check with everyone else.”

36. What’s the lowdown

This phrase is used to ask for the latest or most important information about a situation or topic. It implies a desire for a summary or brief explanation.

  • For example, you might ask a friend, “Hey, what’s the lowdown on this party tonight?”
  • In a work meeting, someone might say, “Before we get started, can you give us the lowdown on the new project?”
  • If you’re curious about a celebrity scandal, you could ask, “What’s the lowdown on that Hollywood gossip?”

37. What’s the skinny

Similar to “What’s the lowdown,” this phrase is used to ask for the latest or most important information about something. It suggests a desire for the inside or confidential information.

  • For instance, you might ask a friend, “Hey, what’s the skinny on that new restaurant?”
  • If you’re interested in a job opening, you could ask, “Can you give me the skinny on the company culture?”
  • In a conversation about a local event, you might say, “I heard there’s a big concert happening. What’s the skinny on tickets?”

38. What’s the dilly

This phrase is used to ask about the current situation or what is happening. It suggests a desire to know what is going on or what the plan is.

  • For example, you might ask a friend, “Hey, what’s the dilly with that party tonight?”
  • If you’re meeting up with someone, you could ask, “What’s the dilly? Where should we meet?”
  • In a discussion about a project, you might say, “Let’s get the team together and figure out what’s the dilly with this deadline.”