Top 25 Slang For White Person – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to slang, every culture and ethnicity has its own unique set of words and phrases. In this listicle, we’ve gathered some of the most common slang terms used to refer to white people. From humorous to derogatory, this compilation will give you a glimpse into the diverse world of slang. Whether you’re looking to expand your vocabulary or simply curious about the linguistic landscape, this article is sure to provide some enlightening insights. So, let’s dive in and explore the intriguing world of slang for white people!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Cracker

This term is often used as a derogatory slang for a white person, particularly in the United States. It originated from the cracking sound made by slave owners using a whip, and was used to demean and dehumanize white people.

  • For example, someone might say, “That cracker thinks he’s better than everyone else.”
  • In a heated argument, one person might insult another by calling them a cracker.
  • The term is considered offensive and should be avoided in respectful conversations.

2. Honky

This is another derogatory term used to refer to a white person, especially in the United States. It is believed to have originated in African American communities as a way to mock and belittle white individuals.

  • For instance, someone might use the term in a sentence like, “Look at that honky trying to act cool.”
  • In a discussion about racial slurs, one might mention that “honky” is considered offensive and disrespectful.
  • It is important to note that using racial slurs is hurtful and perpetuates discrimination.

3. Whitey

This term is a slang term used to refer to a white person. It is considered informal and can be used in a neutral or playful context, depending on the tone and intent of the speaker.

  • For example, one person might say, “Hey, Whitey, wanna grab lunch?” in a friendly manner.
  • In a casual conversation, someone might mention, “I met this cool Whitey at the party last night.”
  • However, it is important to be mindful of the context and audience when using this term, as it can still be perceived as offensive in certain situations.

4. Snowflake

This term is often used to describe individuals, including white people, who are perceived as being overly sensitive, easily offended, or fragile. It can be used to mock or dismiss someone’s opinions or reactions.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Stop being such a snowflake and learn to take a joke.”
  • In a debate about political correctness, one person might argue, “Calling someone a snowflake is just another way to silence valid concerns.”
  • It is important to note that using this term can be dismissive and invalidate someone’s feelings, so it is best to approach discussions with empathy and respect.

5. Vanilla

This term is often used to describe something or someone as plain, ordinary, or lacking in excitement or uniqueness. It can be used to refer to white people in a non-offensive and playful manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s a bit vanilla when it comes to fashion.”
  • In a conversation about food preferences, one person might mention, “I prefer more adventurous flavors. Vanilla is too boring for me.”
  • It is important to note that context and tone play a significant role in how this term is perceived, so it is best to use it in a light-hearted and non-malicious manner.
See also  What Does Empty Barrel Mean? - Meaning, Uses and More

6. Crayola

This term refers to a white person, comparing their pale skin tone to the color of a crayon or colored pencil. It is often used in a lighthearted or playful manner.

  • For example, a friend might jokingly say, “Look at you, Mr. Crayola, blending in with the snow.”
  • In a discussion about diversity, someone might use the term to highlight the lack of representation, saying, “The boardroom is full of Crayolas.”
  • Another person might use it as a term of endearment, saying, “You’re my favorite Crayola, always brightening up my day.”

7. Milkman

This term refers to a white person, drawing a comparison to the stereotype of a milkman being a white person. It is often used in a humorous or ironic way.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Look at Mr. Milkman over here, delivering the whitest dance moves.”
  • In a conversation about stereotypes, someone might use the term to highlight the absurdity of generalizations, saying, “Not all white people are milkmen.”
  • Another person might use it playfully, saying, “You’re the milkman of our group, always bringing the good vibes.”

8. White bread

This term refers to a white person, comparing them to plain white bread, which is often considered plain and unexciting. It is used to describe someone who is perceived as boring or lacking in diversity.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s as white bread as it gets, never taking risks or trying anything new.”
  • In a conversation about cultural experiences, someone might use the term to express the need for diversity, saying, “We need more than just white bread representation.”
  • Another person might use it to describe their own personality, saying, “I used to be white bread, but now I’m trying to spice things up.”

9. Snowman

This term refers to a white person, comparing their skin color to that of a snowman. It is often used in a playful or light-hearted manner.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Hey there, Snowman, enjoying the winter weather?”
  • In a conversation about diversity, someone might use the term to acknowledge the lack of representation, saying, “The room is full of snowmen.”
  • Another person might use it affectionately, saying, “You’re my favorite snowman, always bringing joy wherever you go.”

10. Casper the Friendly Ghost

This term refers to a white person, drawing a comparison to the character Casper the Friendly Ghost, who is portrayed as a friendly and benevolent ghost. It is often used to describe someone who is kind or approachable.

  • For example, a friend might say, “You’re like Casper the Friendly Ghost, always making everyone feel welcome.”
  • In a conversation about personality traits, someone might use the term to describe a person who is easy to talk to, saying, “He’s a real Casper the Friendly Ghost.”
  • Another person might use it playfully, saying, “You’re my Casper, always there to lend a helping hand.”

11. Powder

This term refers to a white person. It is derived from the color of talcum powder, which is typically white.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s a powder, so he’s more susceptible to sunburn.”
  • In a conversation about diversity, one might comment, “We need more representation of people of color in this industry, it’s too powder-dominated.”
  • Another might use it as a descriptive term, saying, “The room was filled with a mix of people, but it was mostly powders.”

12. Ghost

This slang term is used to describe a white person with very fair or pale skin, often to the point of appearing ghostly.

  • For instance, someone might say, “She’s so pale, she’s practically a ghost.”
  • In a discussion about tanning, one might comment, “I envy people who can tan easily, us ghosts just burn.”
  • Another might use it in a humorous way, saying, “I need to wear sunscreen even in the winter, otherwise I turn into a ghost.”

13. Milky

This term is used to describe a white person with light or fair skin, similar to the color of milk.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t spend too much time in the sun, I’m too milky.”
  • In a conversation about beauty standards, one might comment, “The media often portrays milky skin as the ideal.”
  • Another might use it as a descriptive term, saying, “She has milky skin and bright blue eyes, she’s stunning.”

14. Cornfed

This term originated from the Midwest, where corn is a major crop. It refers to a white person who is perceived as being strong, healthy, and well-fed.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s a cornfed boy, grew up working on a farm.”
  • In a discussion about physical strength, one might comment, “You can tell he’s cornfed, he’s built like a tank.”
  • Another might use it as a compliment, saying, “She’s a cornfed beauty, with a healthy glow.”

15. Trailer trash

This derogatory term is used to insult or demean white people who are perceived as being poor, uneducated, and living in a trailer park.

  • For example, someone might say, “Don’t associate with them, they’re just trailer trash.”
  • In a conversation about social class, one might comment, “Using terms like trailer trash perpetuates stereotypes and discrimination.”
  • Another might use it to describe a character in a story, saying, “The protagonist grew up in a trailer park, but she refused to be defined as trailer trash.”

16. Redneck

This term is often used to describe a white person, typically from a rural area, who is seen as uneducated or uncultured. It can be considered derogatory and offensive.

  • For example, someone might say, “Look at those rednecks driving around in their pickup trucks.”
  • In a discussion about stereotypes, a person might comment, “Not all people from rural areas are rednecks.”
  • Another might say, “The term redneck is often used to stereotype and belittle white working-class individuals.”

17. Hillbilly

Similar to “redneck,” this term refers to a white person from a rural area who is perceived as unsophisticated or backward. It is often used in a derogatory manner.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Those hillbillies live in the middle of nowhere.”
  • In a conversation about regional stereotypes, a person might comment, “Hillbilly is a derogatory term used to mock people from certain rural areas.”
  • Another might say, “Using the term hillbilly perpetuates stereotypes and reinforces class divisions.”

18. Gringo

Originally used to describe a white person from the United States, this term is now more broadly used in Latin America to refer to any foreigner, especially someone who speaks English as their first language. It can be neutral or derogatory depending on the context.

  • For example, someone might say, “The gringos are visiting our town for vacation.”
  • In a discussion about cultural differences, a person might comment, “As a gringo living in Mexico, I’ve had to adapt to a new way of life.”
  • Another might say, “Using the term gringo can be offensive as it reduces someone to their nationality.”

19. Pale rider

This term is a poetic way to refer to a white person, emphasizing their fair complexion. It is often used in a neutral or descriptive manner.

  • For instance, someone might say, “The pale rider walked into the room and everyone turned to look.”
  • In a discussion about diversity, a person might comment, “It’s important to recognize the experiences of pale riders in a society that often privileges whiteness.”
  • Another might say, “While the term pale rider may sound poetic, it can still perpetuate stereotypes and reinforce racial hierarchies.”

20. White chocolate

This term is a playful way to refer to a white person, comparing their skin tone to the color of white chocolate. It is often used in a lighthearted or affectionate manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “Hey, white chocolate, what’s up?”
  • In a conversation about nicknames, a person might comment, “I love being called white chocolate by my friends.”
  • Another might say, “Using the term white chocolate can be seen as endearing, but it’s important to consider the context and the relationship between the speaker and the person being referred to.”

21. Milk

This term is used to refer to a white person, often with a light complexion. It is derived from the color of milk, which is typically white.

  • For example, someone might say, “Look at that group of milks over there.”
  • In a discussion about diversity, one might comment, “We need more representation, it can’t just be a bunch of milks.”
  • A person making a joke might say, “Why did the milk go to art school? Because it wanted to be a master of white canvas.”

22. Snowball

This term is a derogatory slang for a white person. It is often used in a negative or mocking manner.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Don’t listen to that snowball, they have no idea what they’re talking about.”
  • In a heated argument, one person might insult the other by calling them a snowball.
  • A person discussing racial stereotypes might mention, “Snowball is just one of many derogatory terms used against white people.”

23. Mayo

This term is used to refer to a white person, often with a bland or unexciting personality. It is derived from the color and reputation of mayonnaise as a plain condiment.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s such a mayo, he never takes risks.”
  • In a discussion about cultural differences, one person might comment, “I can’t live without spicy food, but my mayo friends prefer everything plain.”
  • A person making a joke might say, “Why did the mayo go to the party? Because it heard there would be plain chips.”

24. Crayon

This term is a derogatory slang for a white person, often used to emphasize their light complexion. It is derived from the color of crayons, which are often used to draw or color.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Look at that crayon, they’ve never seen the sun.”
  • In a discussion about diversity, one might comment, “We need to include more than just a bunch of crayons.”
  • A person making a joke might say, “Why did the crayon go to the beach? To get a tan… but it only turned pink!”

25. White knight

This term refers to a white person, often a man, who defends or supports a marginalized group, particularly women, in a way that is seen as self-righteous or performative.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s always trying to save women from problems they don’t need saving from, what a white knight.”
  • In a discussion about allyship, one person might comment, “It’s important to be an ally without being a white knight.”
  • A person criticizing someone’s actions might say, “Stop trying to be a white knight, it’s not your place to save everyone.”