Top 40 Slang For Wine – Meaning & Usage

Wine, the beloved drink of connoisseurs and casual sippers alike, has a language all its own. From the classics to the trendy, there’s a slang term for every wine-related situation. Whether you’re a seasoned sommelier or just enjoy a glass on the weekends, our team has gathered the top slang for wine that will have you sipping and speaking like a true oenophile. So grab a glass, sit back, and get ready to uncork the secrets of wine slang!

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1. Quaffable

This term refers to a wine that is enjoyable and easy to drink, often used to describe wines that are not overly complex or demanding.

  • For example, “This riesling is so quaffable, I could easily finish the whole bottle.”
  • A wine enthusiast might say, “I love a quaffable red wine that I can enjoy with dinner.”
  • When hosting a party, someone might recommend, “Let’s get some quaffable wines that everyone can enjoy.”

2. Cougar Juice

This slang term is used to refer to wine that is popular among older women, particularly those who are attracted to younger men.

  • For instance, “She loves her cougar juice, always ordering a glass of chardonnay.”
  • In a social setting, someone might ask, “Are we serving cougar juice tonight or should I bring something else?”
  • A wine bar might advertise, “Try our selection of cougar juice wines, perfect for a night out with friends.”

3. Grandma Wines

This term is used to describe wines that are typically enjoyed by older generations, often associated with traditional and classic styles.

  • For example, “My grandma loves her grandma wines, like a good Bordeaux.”
  • When discussing wine preferences, someone might say, “I prefer more modern wines, but my dad is all about grandma wines.”
  • A wine shop might have a section labeled “Grandma Wines” with wines that appeal to an older demographic.

4. A.B.C.

This acronym is used to express a dislike or aversion to chardonnay, indicating a preference for other types of wine.

  • For instance, “I’m an A.B.C. kind of person, I can’t stand chardonnay.”
  • In a wine tasting, someone might say, “I’ll try anything but chardonnay, please.”
  • A wine critic might write, “A.B.C. drinkers will appreciate the complexity and elegance of this sauvignon blanc.”

5. Spoofulated

This slang term refers to being drunk or intoxicated specifically from consuming wine.

  • For example, “After a few glasses of that red, I was completely spoofulated.”
  • In a humorous conversation, someone might say, “I had one glass of wine and I’m already feeling spoofulated.”
  • When discussing a wild night out, someone might ask, “Did you get spoofulated on wine or something stronger?”

6. Donut Wine

Donut wine refers to a sweet and fruity wine that is often enjoyed as a dessert wine or with pastries. It is characterized by its rich flavors and high sugar content.

  • For example, “I love pairing a glass of donut wine with a slice of chocolate cake.”
  • A wine enthusiast might describe it as, “Donut wine is like a liquid version of a sugary treat.”
  • In a discussion about wine preferences, someone might say, “I prefer dry wines over donut wines.”

7. Good Legs

Good legs, also known as wine tears or wine curtains, refer to the streaks or droplets of wine that form on the inside surface of a glass after swirling. It indicates the viscosity or thickness of the wine.

  • For instance, “This red wine has good legs, indicating a rich and full-bodied flavor.”
  • A sommelier might explain, “The presence of good legs suggests a higher alcohol or sugar content in the wine.”
  • In a wine tasting event, a participant might comment, “I always look for good legs as a sign of quality in a wine.”

8. Grape

Grape is a slang term used to refer to wine. It is derived from the fact that wine is made from grapes.

  • For example, “Let’s open a bottle of grape and celebrate.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you prefer red or white grape?”
  • In a conversation about alcoholic beverages, someone might say, “I’m not a fan of beer, but I enjoy a glass of grape.”

9. Mouthfeel

Mouthfeel refers to the sensation and texture of wine in the mouth. It encompasses factors such as the body, viscosity, astringency, and overall tactile experience of the wine.

  • For instance, “This red wine has a velvety mouthfeel with smooth tannins.”
  • A wine connoisseur might describe it as, “The mouthfeel of this wine is silky and luxurious.”
  • In a wine tasting note, one might write, “The mouthfeel is crisp and refreshing, with a lively acidity.”

10. Plonk

Plonk is a slang term used to describe cheap and low-quality wine. It is often used in a derogatory manner to refer to wines that lack complexity or depth of flavor.

  • For example, “I wouldn’t waste my money on that plonk.”
  • A wine critic might write, “The plonk tasted like watered-down grape juice.”
  • In a discussion about wine preferences, someone might say, “I’d rather spend a bit more and enjoy a good bottle of wine than settle for plonk.”

11. Pop and Pour

This term refers to the act of opening a bottle of wine and immediately pouring it into glasses to be enjoyed. It implies a casual and spontaneous approach to drinking wine.

  • For example, at a party, someone might say, “Let’s just pop and pour some red wine.”
  • When discussing a bottle of wine that doesn’t require aging, a sommelier might suggest, “It’s a pop and pour kind of wine.”
  • A wine enthusiast might describe a refreshing white wine as, “Perfect for a pop and pour on a hot summer day.”

12. Silky

This term describes a wine that has a soft and smooth texture, similar to the feel of silk. It often indicates a high-quality wine with well-integrated tannins.

  • For instance, a wine reviewer might describe a red wine as, “This Pinot Noir has a silky texture that glides across the palate.”
  • When discussing a wine with a luxurious mouthfeel, a sommelier might say, “It’s a silky wine that coats your mouth.”
  • A wine enthusiast might note, “I love how this Chardonnay feels silky and rich.”

13. Snow Leopard

This term refers to a type of wine that is difficult to find and obtain, similar to the rare and elusive snow leopard. It suggests exclusivity and uniqueness.

  • For example, a wine collector might say, “I managed to get my hands on a bottle of that snow leopard Cabernet Sauvignon.”
  • When discussing a limited-edition wine, a sommelier might mention, “It’s a snow leopard release with only a few hundred bottles produced.”
  • A wine enthusiast might describe a highly sought-after wine as, “The snow leopard of wines, it’s always in high demand.”

14. Wine and Dine

This term refers to the act of enjoying a meal accompanied by wine in a social setting. It suggests a sophisticated and pleasurable experience of indulging in good food and wine.

  • For instance, someone might invite friends to “wine and dine” at a fancy restaurant.
  • When discussing a romantic evening, a couple might plan to “wine and dine” at home with a home-cooked meal and a bottle of wine.
  • A food and wine enthusiast might say, “I love to wine and dine, exploring different flavor combinations.”

15. Vino

This term is a simple and informal way of referring to wine. It is widely used and understood by wine enthusiasts and casual drinkers alike.

  • For example, someone might say, “Let’s grab a bottle of vino for tonight.”
  • When discussing different types of wine, a sommelier might mention, “We have a great selection of red and white vinos.”
  • A wine enthusiast might describe a particularly enjoyable wine as, “This vino is absolutely delicious.”

16. Juice

This slang term refers to wine, often used to describe it in a more casual or colloquial manner. It can also imply that wine is a refreshing and enjoyable beverage.

  • For example, at a party, someone might say, “Hey, pass me a glass of juice.”
  • A wine enthusiast might describe a particular bottle as, “This juice has a complex flavor profile.”
  • In a restaurant, a customer might ask the waiter, “Can I have a glass of red juice, please?”

17. Hooch

This slang term is often used to refer to cheap or low-quality wine. It can also imply that the wine has a high alcohol content.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I can’t afford an expensive bottle, so I’ll just grab some hooch.”
  • A person might describe a wine they didn’t enjoy as, “That hooch was undrinkable.”
  • In a discussion about budget-friendly options, someone might recommend, “If you’re looking for hooch, try this brand.”

18. Grape juice

This slang term is a playful way to refer to wine, highlighting the fact that wine is made from fermented grapes. It can also imply that wine is a delicious and enjoyable beverage.

  • For example, at a gathering, someone might say, “Who wants a glass of grape juice?”
  • A wine connoisseur might describe a particularly exceptional bottle as, “This grape juice is outstanding.”
  • In a conversation about different types of alcohol, someone might mention, “I prefer grape juice over beer or spirits.”

19. Red nectar

This slang term specifically refers to red wine, highlighting its rich color and delicious taste. It can also imply that red wine is a luxurious and indulgent beverage.

  • For instance, at a wine tasting event, someone might say, “I can’t wait to try the red nectar.”
  • A wine enthusiast might describe a bottle of red wine as, “This red nectar is full-bodied and velvety.”
  • In a discussion about food pairing, someone might suggest, “Red nectar goes perfectly with a juicy steak.”

20. White lightning

This slang term specifically refers to white wine, highlighting its light color and refreshing taste. It can also imply that white wine is a vibrant and invigorating beverage.

  • For example, at a picnic, someone might say, “Let’s crack open a bottle of white lightning.”
  • A wine lover might describe a glass of white wine as, “This white lightning is crisp and citrusy.”
  • In a conversation about different wine varietals, someone might mention, “I prefer white lightning over red wine for its lighter flavor.”

21. Vino frizzante

This term refers to a type of wine that has bubbles or effervescence. “Vino frizzante” is the Italian term for sparkling wine.

  • For example, “Let’s celebrate with a bottle of vino frizzante!”
  • A wine enthusiast might say, “I prefer the light and refreshing taste of vino frizzante.”
  • At a party, someone might ask, “Do you have any vino frizzante? I love the bubbles.”

22. Vino verde

This term refers to a type of young wine that is typically light and slightly effervescent. “Vino verde” is the Portuguese term for green wine.

  • For instance, “I’m in the mood for a crisp glass of vino verde.”
  • A wine connoisseur might say, “Vino verde pairs well with seafood dishes.”
  • Someone might ask at a restaurant, “Do you have any vino verde on the menu?”

23. Vinho tinto

This term refers to a type of wine that is made from dark-colored grape varieties. “Vinho tinto” is the Portuguese term for red wine.

  • For example, “I love a glass of vinho tinto with a juicy steak.”
  • A wine enthusiast might say, “Vinho tinto is known for its rich and complex flavors.”
  • At a wine tasting event, someone might ask, “Could you recommend a good vinho tinto?”

24. Vinho branco

This term refers to a type of wine that is made from light-colored grape varieties. “Vinho branco” is the Portuguese term for white wine.

  • For instance, “I prefer a glass of vinho branco with seafood.”
  • A wine connoisseur might say, “Vinho branco is known for its crisp and refreshing taste.”
  • Someone might ask at a restaurant, “Do you have any vinho branco by the glass?”

25. Vinho rosé

This term refers to a type of wine that has a pink or light red color. “Vinho rosé” is the Portuguese term for rosé wine.

  • For example, “I enjoy a glass of vinho rosé on a warm summer day.”
  • A wine enthusiast might say, “Vinho rosé is a versatile wine that pairs well with a variety of dishes.”
  • At a picnic, someone might ask, “Does anyone have a bottle of vinho rosé?”

26. Red/White

Refers to the color of the wine, with “red” indicating red wine and “white” indicating white wine. These terms are commonly used to differentiate between the two main categories of wine.

  • For example, a person might say, “I prefer red wine over white wine.”
  • When ordering at a restaurant, someone might ask, “Do you have any red or white wine by the glass?”
  • In a conversation about wine preferences, one might say, “I enjoy both red and white wines, but I tend to lean towards reds.”

27. Sauce

Colloquial term used to refer to wine. This term is often used informally and can be used to describe any type of wine.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Let’s grab a bottle of sauce for dinner.”
  • In a conversation about a recent trip to a vineyard, someone might mention, “We tasted some amazing sauces during our tour.”
  • When discussing a wine and food pairing, a person might suggest, “A nice sauce would go well with this dish.”

28. Nectar of the Gods

A poetic term used to describe wine, emphasizing its rich and divine qualities. This term is often used to express admiration and appreciation for the taste and experience of drinking wine.

  • For example, someone might say, “This wine is truly the nectar of the gods.”
  • When describing a particularly exceptional wine, a person might exclaim, “I’ve never tasted anything like this before. It’s like the nectar of the gods.”
  • In a discussion about favorite beverages, someone might declare, “Wine is definitely the nectar of the gods for me.”

29. Bottle of Red/Bottle of White

Refers to a bottle of wine, with “red” indicating a bottle of red wine and “white” indicating a bottle of white wine. These terms are commonly used when specifying the type of wine to be served or purchased.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Let’s open a bottle of red for dinner.”
  • When shopping for wine, a person might ask, “Do you have any good bottles of white?”
  • In a conversation about a wine tasting event, someone might mention, “I tried several bottles of red and white wines.”

30. Booze

A colloquial term used to refer to any type of alcoholic beverage, including wine. This term is often used informally and can be used to describe wine in a more casual and lighthearted manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “Let’s grab a bottle of booze for the party.”
  • When discussing different types of alcohol, a person might mention, “I enjoy a glass of wine, but I also like other boozes.”
  • In a conversation about favorite drinks, someone might declare, “Wine is definitely my favorite booze.”

31. Giggle Water

Giggle water is a slang term for any alcoholic beverage, including wine. It is often used in a lighthearted or playful manner to refer to a drink that brings joy or laughter.

  • For example, “Let’s grab a bottle of giggle water and have a fun night out!”
  • In a conversation about cocktails, someone might say, “I love a good giggle water with fruity flavors.”
  • A person sharing their favorite wine might describe it as “the perfect giggle water for a girls’ night in.”
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32. Liquid Courage

Liquid courage is a slang term for any alcoholic beverage, including wine, that is consumed to overcome shyness or gain confidence in social situations.

  • For instance, “I need a glass of liquid courage before I give my presentation.”
  • In a discussion about first dates, someone might say, “A little liquid courage can help ease the nerves.”
  • A person sharing their experience at a party might mention, “I had a bit of liquid courage to help me mingle with new people.”

33. Tipple

Tipple is a verb that means to drink alcohol, including wine, in a casual or moderate manner. It can also be used as a noun to refer to a small amount of alcoholic beverage.

  • For example, “Let’s tipple some wine and enjoy the evening.”
  • In a conversation about weekend plans, someone might say, “I’m looking forward to some relaxing tippling at the vineyard.”
  • A person discussing their favorite drinks might mention, “I enjoy a tipple of red wine with dinner.”

34. Firewater

Firewater is a slang term for a strong alcoholic beverage, including wine, that is known for its high alcohol content and potentially intoxicating effects.

  • For instance, “Be careful with that firewater, it’s stronger than it looks.”
  • In a discussion about party drinks, someone might say, “We’ll bring some firewater to liven up the night.”
  • A person sharing their preference for strong drinks might mention, “I enjoy the warmth and kick of a good firewater.”

35. Moonshine

Moonshine is a slang term for illegally distilled alcohol, including wine, that is typically made in small quantities and without proper licensing or regulation. It is often associated with homemade or bootlegged alcohol.

  • For example, “He brought a jar of moonshine to the party, but we weren’t sure if we should drink it.”
  • In a conversation about prohibition, someone might say, “People got creative with making moonshine during that time.”
  • A person discussing unique alcoholic beverages might mention, “I once tried a moonshine wine made from wild berries, and it had a distinct flavor.”

36. The Good Stuff

This term refers to wine that is considered to be of excellent quality or highly enjoyable. It is often used to describe wine that is expensive or rare.

  • For example, a wine connoisseur might say, “I finally got my hands on a bottle of the good stuff.”
  • When recommending a wine, someone might say, “You have to try this, it’s the good stuff.”
  • At a fancy restaurant, a waiter might ask, “Would you like to see our selection of the good stuff?”

37. Libation

This term is a general term for any alcoholic beverage, including wine. It is often used in a ceremonial or formal context.

  • For instance, during a toast, someone might say, “Let’s raise our glasses and enjoy this libation.”
  • When discussing different types of alcohol, someone might say, “Wine is just one type of libation.”
  • At a party, someone might offer a guest a libation and say, “Would you like a glass of wine or another libation?”

38. The Hard Stuff

This term is often used to refer to strong alcoholic drinks, such as spirits or liquors. It is used to distinguish them from lighter alcoholic beverages like wine or beer.

  • For example, when someone asks for a drink recommendation, another person might say, “Do you prefer wine or the hard stuff?”
  • When discussing different types of alcohol, someone might say, “I usually stick to wine, but occasionally I’ll have the hard stuff.”
  • At a bar, a bartender might ask, “Are you in the mood for wine or something from the hard stuff?”

39. Nightcap

This term refers to a drink, often alcoholic, that is consumed before going to bed. It is meant to help relax and unwind before sleep.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I like to have a glass of wine as a nightcap.”
  • When discussing nighttime routines, someone might mention, “I always end the day with a nightcap.”
  • At a hotel, a guest might ask, “Do you have any recommendations for a good nightcap?”

40. Hair of the Dog

This term refers to having an alcoholic drink, often in the morning, to alleviate the symptoms of a hangover. It is based on the belief that consuming a small amount of alcohol can help ease the discomfort caused by excessive drinking.

  • For example, someone might say, “I had a rough night, so I’m going to have a little hair of the dog.”
  • When discussing hangover remedies, someone might suggest, “Try a glass of wine as a hair of the dog.”
  • After a night of heavy drinking, someone might joke, “I need some hair of the dog to get through the day.”