Top 34 Slang For Withdraw – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing the act of withdrawing from a situation or group, language is key. Discover the top slang terms used to describe withdrawal in various contexts, from social gatherings to online interactions. Let our expertly curated list equip you with the perfect words to navigate these scenarios effortlessly.

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1. Cash out

To cash out means to withdraw money from an account or to convert an asset into cash. The term is often used in the context of financial transactions or investments.

  • For example, “I’m going to cash out my winnings at the casino.”
  • In a discussion about cryptocurrency, someone might say, “I’m planning to cash out my Bitcoin when the price reaches a certain level.”
  • A person might comment, “I need to cash out some of my investments to cover my expenses.”

2. Dip

To dip means to leave or depart abruptly. The term is often used to indicate a sudden withdrawal from a situation or location.

  • For instance, “I’m going to dip out of this party early.”
  • In a conversation about a boring meeting, someone might say, “I can’t wait to dip out of there as soon as it’s over.”
  • A person might comment, “I had to dip out of the conversation because it was getting too heated.”

3. Bail

To bail means to leave or exit a situation or place quickly. The term is often used to indicate a hasty withdrawal, especially in order to avoid trouble or unpleasantness.

  • For example, “I had to bail on the party when the police showed up.”
  • In a discussion about a bad date, someone might say, “I couldn’t stand it anymore, so I bailed on him.”
  • A person might comment, “I bailed on the meeting because it was going nowhere.”

4. GTFO

GTFO is an acronym that stands for “Get the f*** out.” It is a strong and explicit expression used to tell someone to leave immediately or to express frustration or disbelief.

  • For instance, “I can’t believe she said that. She needs to GTFO.”
  • In a conversation about an annoying coworker, someone might say, “I wish he would just GTFO of the office.”
  • A person might comment, “If they don’t like it here, they can GTFO and find another job.”

5. Pull out

To pull out means to withdraw or retreat from a situation, often with the intention of removing oneself from potential harm or avoiding further involvement.

  • For example, “I decided to pull out of the project because it wasn’t a good fit.”
  • In a discussion about a risky investment, someone might say, “I’m going to pull out before I lose any more money.”
  • A person might comment, “When things get too intense, sometimes it’s best to pull out and take a break.”

6. Dip out

To “dip out” means to leave a place or situation suddenly or without warning.

  • For example, “I’m going to dip out of this party early, it’s getting boring.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s dip out of this restaurant and find somewhere better to eat.”
  • In a conversation about a bad date, someone might say, “When he started talking about his ex, I knew it was time to dip out.”

7. Cash in

To “cash in” means to collect or redeem something, often in the context of rewards or benefits.

  • For instance, “I’m going to cash in my vacation days and take a trip.”
  • A person might say, “I finally cashed in my credit card points for a free flight.”
  • In a discussion about loyalty programs, someone might mention, “I always make sure to cash in my rewards before they expire.”

8. Bounce

To “bounce” means to leave a place or situation quickly or abruptly.

  • For example, “I have to bounce, I have another appointment.”
  • A person might say, “I bounced from the party as soon as I saw my ex.”
  • In a conversation about a boring meeting, someone might say, “I can’t wait to bounce out of there and go home.”

9. Peace out

To “peace out” means to say goodbye or leave a place or situation.

  • For instance, “I’m tired, so I’m going to peace out and go to bed.”
  • A friend might say, “Peace out, see you tomorrow!”
  • In a conversation about ending a phone call, someone might say, “Alright, I’ll talk to you later. Peace out!”

10. Dipset

To “dipset” means to leave a place or situation quickly, similar to “dip out.”

  • For example, “I’m not enjoying this party, I think I’m going to dipset.”
  • A person might say, “I dippedset as soon as I heard the sirens.”
  • In a conversation about avoiding a confrontation, someone might say, “When I saw him coming, I dipset before he could start a fight.”

11. Dip down

This slang phrase is often used to describe someone leaving a situation or place suddenly and without warning.

  • For example, “I saw him dip down from the party without saying goodbye.”
  • A friend might say, “I’m going to dip down from work early today.”
  • Someone might comment, “She dipped down from the conversation when it got too intense.”

12. Cash flow

This term refers to the movement of money, either into or out of a person’s possession or a business.

  • For instance, “I need to check my cash flow before making any big purchases.”
  • A financial advisor might say, “Managing your cash flow is crucial for budgeting and saving.”
  • Someone might ask, “What’s your cash flow like this month?”

13. Dip out of

This phrase is often used to describe someone leaving a place or situation abruptly or without warning.

  • For example, “He decided to dip out of the party early.”
  • A friend might say, “I’m going to dip out of this meeting, it’s not productive.”
  • Someone might comment, “She dipped out of the conversation when it became heated.”

14. Cash withdrawal

This term refers to the act of taking money out of a bank account or any other financial account.

  • For instance, “I need to make a cash withdrawal to pay for my rent.”
  • A teller at the bank might ask, “How much would you like to withdraw today?”
  • Someone might say, “I made a cash withdrawal from the ATM earlier.”

15. Dip out on

This slang phrase is often used to describe someone not following through on a promise or commitment.

  • For example, “He dipped out on our plans to go to the movies.”
  • A friend might say, “Don’t dip out on me, we made these plans weeks ago!”
  • Someone might comment, “She always dips out on her responsibilities.”

16. Cash advance

A cash advance is a short-term loan that is typically repaid with high interest rates and fees. It allows individuals to access cash quickly, but it can be a costly way to borrow money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to get a cash advance to cover my bills until payday.”
  • A person discussing financial struggles might mention, “I had to rely on cash advances to make ends meet.”
  • Another might warn, “Be careful with cash advances, as the interest rates can be extremely high.”

17. Dip into

To dip into means to use or access a portion of one’s funds or savings for a specific purpose.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I had to dip into my savings to pay for unexpected car repairs.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, one might suggest, “Try not to dip into your emergency fund unless absolutely necessary.”
  • A person might admit, “I had to dip into my retirement savings to cover medical expenses.”

18. Cash pull

To cash pull means to take out or withdraw money from a bank account or other financial source.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to cash pull from my savings account to pay for my vacation.”
  • A person discussing financial planning might mention, “I have a set amount I cash pull each month for my discretionary spending.”
  • Another might advise, “Make sure to keep track of how much you cash pull to avoid overspending.”

19. Dip from

To dip from means to withdraw or take money out from a bank account or other financial source.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to dip from my checking account to pay my rent.”
  • In a discussion about personal finance, one might suggest, “Try not to dip from your savings unless it’s for a necessary expense.”
  • A person might explain, “I dipped from my emergency fund to cover unexpected medical bills.”

20. Cash drop

A cash drop refers to a withdrawal of money from a bank account or other financial source.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to make a cash drop to pay for my child’s school fees.”
  • A person discussing budgeting might mention, “I have a specific amount I allocate for cash drops each month.”
  • Another might advise, “Keep track of your cash drops to ensure you’re staying within your budget.”

21. Dip outta

To leave a place or situation abruptly or without warning.

  • For example, “I’m going to dip outta this party, it’s getting boring.”
  • Someone might say, “I saw him dip outta the meeting as soon as it started.”
  • In a conversation about avoiding a difficult situation, a person might suggest, “Just dip outta there before it gets worse.”

22. Cash grabber

A person who seizes or takes money quickly and often without regard for others or the consequences.

  • For instance, “He’s always trying to be a cash grabber, taking advantage of any opportunity to make money.”
  • In a discussion about dishonest business practices, someone might say, “That company is known for being a cash grabber.”
  • A person might warn, “Watch out for cash grabbers who promise quick riches but deliver nothing.”

23. Cash move

A financial action or decision, often involving the movement or transfer of money.

  • For example, “Investing in stocks can be a smart cash move.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might say, “I need to make some cash moves to save for a vacation.”
  • A person discussing a business decision might say, “Acquiring that company was a strategic cash move.”

24. Cash out on

To take advantage of or benefit financially from a situation or opportunity.

  • For instance, “He was able to cash out on his investment before the market crashed.”
  • In a discussion about selling a property, someone might say, “I want to cash out on my house while the market is hot.”
  • A person might advise, “If you have the chance to cash out on a business venture, take it.”

25. Cash out of

To withdraw money from a bank account or financial institution.

  • For example, “I need to cash out of my savings account to pay for the car repairs.”
  • In a conversation about personal finances, someone might say, “I try not to cash out of my retirement account unless it’s an emergency.”
  • A person discussing a financial decision might say, “I’m considering cashing out of my investments to pursue a new opportunity.”

26. Withdrawal

This term refers to the action of taking money out of a bank account or other financial institution. It can also refer to the symptoms experienced when someone stops using a drug they are addicted to.

  • For example, “I need to make a withdrawal from my savings account to pay for the new car.”
  • In a discussion about addiction, someone might say, “The withdrawal symptoms from opioids can be extremely challenging.”
  • A person might comment, “I made a withdrawal from the ATM and got hit with a huge fee.”

27. Liquidate

To liquidate means to convert assets into cash, often by selling them. This term is commonly used when referring to selling off investments or closing down a business.

  • For instance, “The company had to liquidate its assets to pay off its debts.”
  • In a discussion about personal finance, someone might say, “I had to liquidate some of my stocks to cover unexpected expenses.”
  • A person might comment, “When you liquidate an investment, make sure to consider any tax implications.”

28. Empty the account

This phrase means to completely withdraw or deplete all the funds from a bank account.

  • For example, “I had to empty the account to pay for medical bills.”
  • In a discussion about financial planning, someone might say, “It’s important to have an emergency fund so you don’t have to drain the account in times of crisis.”
  • A person might comment, “I emptied the account and treated myself to a well-deserved vacation.”

29. Deplete funds

To deplete funds means to gradually use up or exhaust the available money.

  • For instance, “Unexpected expenses have depleted my funds.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might say, “It’s important to track your expenses so you don’t deplete your funds too quickly.”
  • A person might comment, “I need to be careful not to deplete my funds before the end of the month.”

30. Clear out

To clear out means to remove or take everything, often in the context of money or valuables.

  • For example, “I cleared out my wallet to pay for dinner.”
  • In a discussion about decluttering, someone might say, “I cleared out my closet and made some extra cash by selling clothes.”
  • A person might comment, “I cleared out my bank account to invest in a new business venture.”

31. Redeem funds

Redeeming funds refers to the process of withdrawing money from an account or investment. It can also involve converting rewards or points into cash.

  • For example, “I redeemed my funds from my savings account to pay for the vacation.”
  • A person might say, “I redeemed my credit card rewards for cash.”
  • In a discussion about investments, someone might mention, “I’m planning to redeem my funds from the mutual fund next month.”

32. Cash extract

Cash extract is a slang term used to describe the action of withdrawing physical currency from a bank or ATM.

  • For instance, “I need to make a cash extract to pay for the concert tickets.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to do a quick cash extract.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might mention, “I limit my cash extracts to avoid overspending.”

33. Cash removal

Cash removal refers to the act of taking out physical currency from a bank or ATM.

  • For example, “I made a cash removal to cover my expenses for the week.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer cash removal over using my card for small purchases.”
  • In a discussion about financial planning, someone might mention, “I allocate a specific amount for cash removal each month.”

34. Cash departure

Cash departure is a slang term used to describe the action of leaving a location or situation with physical currency in hand.

  • For instance, “After winning at the casino, I made a quick cash departure.”
  • A person might say, “I always make sure to have a cash departure when leaving a party.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might mention, “I had a cash departure from the foreign country to avoid currency exchange fees.”
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