Top 65 Slang For Work – Meaning & Usage

In the fast-paced world of work, staying up-to-date with the latest slang for the office is essential. Whether you’re a seasoned professional or just starting out, understanding the language of the workplace can help you navigate conversations and connect with colleagues. At FluentSlang, we’ve compiled a list of the top slang terms for work that will not only keep you in the loop but also have you impressing your coworkers with your newfound knowledge. Get ready to level up your workplace communication game!

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1. Axe

When someone is “axed,” it means they have been fired or let go from their job. The term “axe” is often used to describe a sudden and abrupt termination.

  • For example, “The company had to axe several employees due to budget cuts.”
  • A manager might say, “We had to axe John because of his poor performance.”
  • In a conversation about layoffs, someone might ask, “Did they axe anyone from your department?”

2. Back to the drawing board

When someone says “back to the drawing board,” it means they need to start over or come up with a new approach to a problem or project.

  • For instance, “Our marketing campaign didn’t yield the desired results, so it’s back to the drawing board.”
  • A team member might suggest, “Let’s go back to the drawing board and brainstorm some fresh ideas.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “We’ve hit a roadblock, so it’s time to go back to the drawing board.”

3. Back to the salt mines

This phrase is used humorously to describe going back to work after taking time off or enjoying a break. It implies that work can be laborious and tiring, similar to working in a salt mine.

  • For example, “Vacation’s over, time to go back to the salt mines.”
  • A colleague might jokingly say, “Enjoy your weekend, but remember, it’s back to the salt mines on Monday!”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “How was your day back at the salt mines?”

4. Blue collar worker

A “blue collar worker” refers to someone who works in a job that typically requires physical labor, such as construction, manufacturing, or maintenance work. The term originates from the blue-colored shirts often worn by manual laborers.

  • For instance, “My father has been a blue collar worker his whole life.”
  • A friend might say, “I’m considering a career as a blue collar worker because I enjoy working with my hands.”
  • In a discussion about job opportunities, someone might mention, “There’s a demand for skilled blue collar workers in the trades industry.”

5. Deadwood

When someone refers to “deadwood” in the workplace, they are talking about employees who are unproductive, inefficient, or no longer contribute much value to the company.

  • For example, “We need to get rid of the deadwood and bring in fresh talent.”
  • A manager might say, “We can’t afford to carry deadwood on our team.”
  • In a conversation about performance evaluations, someone might ask, “How do we identify and address deadwood in the company?”

6. Bust one’s buns

This phrase means to put in a lot of effort or work extremely hard.

  • For example, “I had to bust my buns to meet the deadline.”
  • A coworker might say, “I’ve been busting my buns all week to finish this project.”
  • In a conversation about work ethic, someone might mention, “If you want to succeed, you have to be willing to bust your buns.”

7. Bumped up

To be “bumped up” means to be promoted to a higher position or given more responsibilities.

  • For instance, “I got bumped up to manager after only a year.”
  • A coworker might say, “Congratulations on getting bumped up! You deserve it.”
  • In a discussion about career progression, someone might mention, “I’m hoping to get bumped up to a senior role soon.”

8. Carve out a niche

This phrase means to create or find a unique and specialized area or role within a larger industry or market.

  • For example, “She carved out a niche for herself in the fashion industry by designing eco-friendly clothing.”
  • A business owner might say, “We need to carve out a niche for our company to stand out from the competition.”
  • In a conversation about entrepreneurship, someone might mention, “Finding your niche is crucial for long-term success.”

9. Desk jockey

A “desk jockey” refers to someone who works primarily at a desk in an office setting.

  • For instance, “He’s been a desk jockey for years, but he’s looking for a more active job.”
  • A coworker might say, “I’m tired of being a desk jockey. I need to get out and do something more hands-on.”
  • In a discussion about office culture, someone might mention, “Desk jockeys often struggle with sedentary lifestyles and back problems.”

10. Dog eat dog world

This phrase describes a highly competitive and ruthless environment where people will do anything to succeed.

  • For example, “The business world can be a dog eat dog world, so you have to be willing to fight for your place.”
  • A coworker might say, “It’s a dog eat dog world out there, so make sure you’re always on top of your game.”
  • In a conversation about workplace dynamics, someone might mention, “In a dog eat dog world, it’s important to build strong relationships and alliances.”

11. 9 to 5

Refers to the typical working hours of a full-time job, usually from 9 AM to 5 PM. It implies a traditional work schedule with set hours.

  • For example, “I work a 9 to 5 job, Monday through Friday.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t wait for the weekend to start. Only a few more hours of this 9 to 5 grind.”
  • In a discussion about work-life balance, someone might comment, “I wish I didn’t have to be stuck in the office for a 9 to 5 job.”

12. Cubicle farm

Refers to a workplace where employees work in cubicles arranged in rows or grids, resembling a farm. It implies a lack of privacy and a monotonous work environment.

  • For instance, “I hate working in this cubicle farm. I feel like I’m just a number.”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t concentrate with all the noise in this cubicle farm.”
  • In a conversation about office layouts, someone might say, “I prefer open spaces over cubicle farms. They foster better collaboration.”

13. Micromanage

Refers to a management style where a supervisor closely monitors and controls every aspect of an employee’s work. It implies a lack of trust and autonomy.

  • For example, “My boss always micromanages me. It’s frustrating.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t stand being micromanaged. I need some freedom to do my job.”
  • In a discussion about leadership, someone might comment, “Micromanaging employees often leads to decreased productivity and demotivation.”

14. Water cooler talk

Refers to casual conversations or gossip that takes place among colleagues during breaks or around the office water cooler. It implies non-work-related discussions.

  • For instance, “Let’s catch up on some water cooler talk during lunch.”
  • A person might say, “I heard some interesting rumors during the water cooler talk.”
  • In a conversation about office culture, someone might comment, “Water cooler talk can help foster a sense of community and camaraderie among coworkers.”

15. Clock in/out

Refers to the act of recording the start and end time of one’s workday, usually using a time clock or an electronic system. It implies the formal tracking of working hours.

  • For example, “Don’t forget to clock in when you arrive at the office.”
  • A person might say, “I always clock out right at 5 PM to make sure I’m not working overtime.”
  • In a discussion about work attendance, someone might comment, “Clocking in and out helps ensure accurate payment and adherence to company policies.”

16. Corporate ladder

This term refers to the hierarchical structure and progression of job positions within a corporate organization. It implies climbing up the ranks and achieving higher-level positions.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m trying to climb the corporate ladder and become a manager.”
  • In a conversation about career goals, a person might mention, “I want to make it to the top of the corporate ladder.”
  • A motivational speaker might say, “Don’t be afraid to take risks and make bold moves to climb the corporate ladder.”

17. Freelancer

A freelancer is someone who works independently and is not employed by a specific company. They offer their services to clients on a project basis and often have multiple clients at once.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I work as a freelancer and take on different design projects.”
  • In a discussion about work flexibility, a person might mention, “Being a freelancer allows me to work from anywhere.”
  • A freelancer might say, “I enjoy the freedom and autonomy that comes with being a freelancer.”

18. Punch the clock

This phrase refers to the act of recording one’s arrival or departure time at work using a time clock or electronic system. It implies adhering to strict work hours and following a set schedule.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to punch the clock before I leave for the day.”
  • In a conversation about work routines, a person might mention, “I always punch the clock at exactly 9 AM.”
  • A supervisor might remind their employees, “Don’t forget to punch the clock when you arrive and leave.”

19. Workaholic

A workaholic is a person who is addicted to work and has an intense drive to constantly be working. They often prioritize work over other aspects of their life and may struggle to find a healthy work-life balance.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m a workaholic and can’t seem to take a break.”
  • In a discussion about work habits, a person might mention, “I used to be a workaholic, but I’ve learned to prioritize self-care.”
  • A friend might express concern and say, “You need to take a break and not be such a workaholic.”

20. Office politics

Office politics refers to the complex relationships, power dynamics, and interpersonal conflicts that occur within a workplace. It involves navigating social hierarchies, alliances, and competition for influence or advancement.

  • For example, someone might say, “I try to stay out of office politics and focus on my work.”
  • In a conversation about workplace challenges, a person might mention, “Office politics can sometimes hinder productivity and teamwork.”
  • A manager might provide guidance and say, “It’s important to be aware of office politics and handle conflicts diplomatically.”

21. Burnout

Burnout refers to a state of chronic physical and emotional exhaustion caused by excessive and prolonged stress. It often occurs in the workplace and can lead to decreased productivity and feelings of cynicism and detachment.

  • For example, “I’ve been working long hours and not taking breaks, and now I’m experiencing burnout.”
  • A colleague might say, “I can’t keep up with the demands of this job anymore. I think I’m heading towards burnout.”
  • A manager might recognize signs of burnout in an employee and suggest, “It’s important to take time off and recharge to avoid burnout.”

22. Slack off

To slack off means to avoid work or responsibilities, often by procrastinating or being lazy. It implies a lack of effort or motivation to perform tasks or meet deadlines.

  • For instance, “I need to stop slacking off and start working on this project.”
  • A coworker might comment, “He’s always slacking off and leaving his work for others to do.”
  • A supervisor might warn, “If you continue to slack off, there will be consequences.”

23. Blue-collar

Blue-collar refers to jobs or workers who perform manual labor, typically in industries such as manufacturing, construction, and maintenance. The term originated from the blue-colored shirts traditionally worn by manual laborers.

  • For example, “My father worked as a blue-collar worker in a factory.”
  • A discussion about the economy might mention, “Blue-collar jobs are essential for the country’s infrastructure.”
  • An article might highlight, “Blue-collar workers often face physical demands and lower wages compared to white-collar workers.”

24. White-collar

White-collar refers to jobs or workers who perform professional or managerial work in an office or administrative setting. The term originated from the white-colored shirts traditionally worn by professionals.

  • For instance, “She works as a white-collar employee in a corporate office.”
  • A conversation about career paths might include, “Many people aspire to have white-collar jobs.”
  • An article might discuss, “White-collar workers often have higher levels of education and earn higher salaries compared to blue-collar workers.”

25. Telecommute

Telecommute refers to the practice of working remotely or from a location outside of the traditional office environment, typically using technology to connect with colleagues and perform job tasks.

  • For example, “Due to the pandemic, many employees now telecommute instead of coming into the office.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Are you planning to telecommute tomorrow?”
  • An article might provide tips for successful telecommuting, such as “Create a dedicated workspace and establish a routine when telecommuting.”

26. Grind

This term refers to the effort and dedication put into work or a specific task. It can also imply a repetitive or monotonous routine.

  • For example, “I’ve been grinding all day to meet the deadline.”
  • A person might say, “I respect his grind, he’s always putting in the hours.”
  • In a conversation about career advancement, someone might mention, “Success requires a lot of grind and perseverance.”

27. Hustle

This term describes the act of putting in extra effort or working hard to achieve a goal or make money. It can also refer to having a side job or pursuing multiple projects simultaneously.

  • For instance, “She’s always hustling to make ends meet.”
  • A person might say, “I respect his hustle, he’s always finding ways to make money.”
  • In a discussion about entrepreneurship, someone might say, “Successful entrepreneurs have a strong hustle mentality.”

28. 9-to-5

This phrase refers to the typical work schedule of many employees, working from 9 AM to 5 PM. It is often used to describe a regular office job with set hours.

  • For example, “I work a 9-to-5 job, Monday through Friday.”
  • Someone might mention, “I’m tired of the 9-to-5 grind, I want more flexibility in my schedule.”
  • In a conversation about work-life balance, a person might say, “I prefer a job that allows me to have more control over my time than a typical 9-to-5.”

29. Rat race

This term describes a competitive and stressful work environment where individuals are constantly striving to get ahead or achieve success. It can also imply a feeling of being trapped or stuck in a never-ending cycle.

  • For instance, “I feel like I’m stuck in the rat race, always chasing promotions.”
  • A person might say, “I want to escape the rat race and pursue a more fulfilling career.”
  • In a discussion about work culture, someone might mention, “The rat race mentality can lead to burnout and dissatisfaction.”

30. Daily grind

This term refers to the daily routine or mundane tasks involved in one’s job. It can also imply a sense of monotony or boredom.

  • For example, “I’m just going through the daily grind, doing the same tasks every day.”
  • A person might say, “I need a break from the daily grind, it’s becoming too repetitive.”
  • In a conversation about work-life balance, someone might mention, “Finding meaning in the daily grind is important for overall job satisfaction.”

31. Punching the clock

This phrase refers to the act of recording one’s arrival and departure times at work, typically using a time clock or electronic system. It implies a routine and often monotonous job.

  • For example, “I hate punching the clock every day. It feels like I’m just a number.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Did you remember to punch the clock this morning?”
  • Someone might complain, “I wish I didn’t have to punch the clock and could work more flexibly.”

32. Slave away

This expression suggests working tirelessly or putting in excessive effort, often without proper recognition or reward.

  • For instance, “I’ve been slaving away to meet this deadline.”
  • A colleague might say, “I saw you slaving away in the office yesterday. Good job!”
  • Someone might complain, “I’m tired of slaving away for this company without any appreciation.”

33. Burn the midnight oil

This phrase means to work late into the night, often sacrificing sleep or leisure time in order to complete tasks.

  • For example, “I have to burn the midnight oil to finish this report.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Are you burning the midnight oil again?”
  • Someone might say, “I burned the midnight oil last night, but I finally finished the project.”

34. Salt mine

This term is used to describe a workplace that is challenging, demanding, or unenjoyable.

  • For instance, “I can’t wait to get out of this salt mine and find a better job.”
  • A colleague might say, “I’ve been stuck in this salt mine for years. It’s draining.”
  • Someone might complain, “The boss makes this place feel like a salt mine with all the pressure.”

35. Treadmill

This word is used to describe a job or work environment that feels repetitive and unstimulating, where one feels like they are going through the motions.

  • For example, “I’m tired of this treadmill job. It’s the same thing every day.”
  • A coworker might say, “I feel like I’m on a treadmill in this job. It’s hard to get ahead.”
  • Someone might complain, “I need a new job. This treadmill is sucking the life out of me.”

36. Punching in/out

This phrase refers to the act of recording one’s arrival or departure from work by using a time clock or electronic system. It is commonly used to track employee attendance and calculate hours worked.

  • For example, “Don’t forget to punch in when you arrive at the office.”
  • A coworker might ask, “What time did you punch out yesterday?”
  • A supervisor might remind an employee, “Make sure you punch in on time to avoid any discrepancies in your pay.”

37. Grinding the gears

This slang phrase is often used to describe the feeling of struggling or facing difficulties in the workplace. It implies that the individual is having a hard time and finding it challenging to make progress.

  • For instance, a colleague might say, “I’ve been grinding the gears trying to meet this deadline.”
  • In a team meeting, someone might comment, “It feels like we’re all grinding the gears on this project.”
  • An employee might express frustration by saying, “I’ve been grinding the gears all day and still can’t figure out this problem.”

38. Breaking your back

This phrase is used to describe someone who is working extremely hard or putting in a lot of physical or mental effort at work. It suggests that the individual is exerting themselves to the point of extreme exhaustion.

  • For example, a coworker might say, “I’ve been breaking my back to meet the client’s demands.”
  • During a busy period, someone might comment, “We’re all breaking our backs to get this project done on time.”
  • An employee might express their dedication by saying, “I’m willing to break my back to ensure the success of this company.”

39. Beavering away

This slang phrase is used to describe someone who is working diligently or industriously. It compares the individual’s work ethic to that of a beaver, known for its hard work in building dams.

  • For instance, a colleague might say, “She’s always beavering away in her cubicle.”
  • During a team meeting, someone might comment, “Let’s all beaver away to meet the deadline.”
  • An employee might express their commitment by saying, “I’ll beavering away until this project is completed.”

40. Slogging away

This phrase is used to describe someone who is working persistently or continuously, often in a laborious or repetitive manner. It implies that the individual is putting in a lot of effort over an extended period of time.

  • For example, a coworker might say, “I’ve been slogging away at this spreadsheet all morning.”
  • During a long-term project, someone might comment, “We’ve been slogging away for weeks, but we’re making progress.”
  • An employee might express their dedication by saying, “I’ll keep slogging away until I achieve my goals.”

41. Toiling away

This phrase means to work strenuously or laboriously for a long period of time.

  • For example, “I’ve been toiling away at this project all day.”
  • A coworker might say, “She’s always toiling away in the office, even on weekends.”
  • A manager might ask, “Are you willing to toil away for the success of the company?”

42. Plugging away

This phrase means to continue working diligently and making progress, often despite challenges or obstacles.

  • For instance, “I’ve been plugging away at this report for hours.”
  • A colleague might say, “Keep plugging away, and you’ll get it done.”
  • A supervisor might encourage, “Don’t give up, just keep plugging away at it.”

43. Chained to the desk

This phrase refers to feeling trapped or obligated to remain at one’s desk or workplace for an extended period of time.

  • For example, “I’ve been chained to my desk all day, trying to meet the deadline.”
  • A coworker might sympathize, “I know the feeling of being chained to the desk.”
  • A manager might say, “I understand you feel chained to your desk, but we need to finish this project.”

44. Burning the candle at both ends

This phrase means to work excessively and exhaustively, often by extending one’s work hours into the early morning and late evening.

  • For instance, “He’s been burning the candle at both ends to meet the project deadline.”
  • A coworker might express concern, “You need to take a break. You’ve been burning the candle at both ends for weeks.”
  • A supervisor might advise, “Don’t burn the candle at both ends. Take care of your health and well-being.”

45. Keeping your nose to the grindstone

This phrase means to work diligently and persistently, often with a focus on completing tasks and achieving goals.

  • For example, “She’s always keeping her nose to the grindstone, ensuring everything gets done.”
  • A coworker might compliment, “I admire your ability to keep your nose to the grindstone even during challenging times.”
  • A manager might say, “Keep your nose to the grindstone, and we’ll reach our targets.”

46. Putting in the hours

This phrase is used to describe someone who is working hard and putting in a lot of time and effort into their work.

  • For example, “I’ve been putting in the hours to meet the deadline.”
  • A coworker might say, “She’s always putting in the hours and going above and beyond.”
  • Someone might mention, “Putting in the hours is necessary to succeed in this industry.”

47. Sweating blood

This phrase is used to emphasize the intensity and difficulty of the work being done.

  • For instance, “I’ve been sweating blood to finish this project on time.”
  • A colleague might say, “He’s been sweating blood to make this event a success.”
  • Someone might comment, “Sweating blood is just part of the job in this field.”

48. Working your fingers to the bone

This phrase is used to describe someone who is working tirelessly and putting in a lot of physical and mental effort into their work.

  • For example, “I’ve been working my fingers to the bone to meet the deadline.”
  • A coworker might say, “She’s always working her fingers to the bone and never takes a break.”
  • Someone might mention, “Working your fingers to the bone is necessary in this line of work.”

49. Slaving over a hot stove

This phrase is often used metaphorically to describe someone who is working tirelessly and putting in a lot of effort and energy into their work.

  • For instance, “I’ve been slaving over a hot stove all day to prepare this meal.”
  • A chef might say, “We slaved over a hot stove to create this culinary masterpiece.”
  • Someone might comment, “Slaving over a hot stove is a labor of love for those passionate about cooking.”

50. Working like a dog

This phrase is used to describe someone who is working diligently and without rest, often with a sense of dedication and determination.

  • For example, “I’ve been working like a dog to meet the project deadline.”
  • A coworker might say, “He’s always working like a dog and never takes a break.”
  • Someone might mention, “Working like a dog is necessary to achieve success in this field.”

51. Working your socks off

This phrase is used to describe someone who is working extremely hard or putting in a substantial amount of effort.

  • For example, “I’ve been working my socks off to meet the deadline.”
  • A coworker might say, “She always works her socks off, it’s inspiring.”
  • In a conversation about work ethic, someone might mention, “You have to be willing to work your socks off if you want to succeed.”

52. Doing the heavy lifting

This phrase is used to describe someone who is responsible for doing the challenging or essential work in a project or task.

  • For instance, “John is always doing the heavy lifting in our team.”
  • A manager might say, “I need someone who can do the heavy lifting for this project.”
  • In a discussion about teamwork, someone might mention, “Everyone needs to contribute and do their fair share of the heavy lifting.”

53. Pulling your weight

This phrase is used to describe someone who is fulfilling their responsibilities and doing their fair share of work.

  • For example, “Everyone on the team needs to pull their weight.”
  • A coworker might say, “She always pulls her weight and never slacks off.”
  • In a conversation about teamwork, someone might mention, “If everyone pulls their weight, we can accomplish anything.”

54. Carrying the load

This phrase is used to describe someone who is taking on a significant amount of responsibility or carrying a heavy workload.

  • For instance, “She’s been carrying the load for the entire department.”
  • A manager might say, “We need someone who can handle the pressure and carry the load.”
  • In a discussion about workload distribution, someone might mention, “It’s not fair for one person to carry the load while others relax.”

55. Earning your keep

This phrase is used to describe someone who is working hard enough or producing enough value to justify their employment or presence in a certain situation.

  • For example, “If you want to be successful, you have to earn your keep.”
  • A coworker might say, “He’s definitely earning his keep with all the extra hours he’s putting in.”
  • In a conversation about job performance, someone might mention, “You need to prove yourself and earn your keep in this competitive industry.”

56. Busting your hump

This phrase means to put in a lot of effort and work very hard.

  • For example, “I’ve been busting my hump all week to meet this deadline.”
  • In a conversation about a challenging project, someone might say, “We’re all busting our humps to get this done on time.”
  • A coworker might compliment another by saying, “You’ve really been busting your hump lately. Keep up the good work!”

57. Hitting the books

This slang phrase refers to engaging in focused studying or academic work, typically in preparation for an exam or assignment.

  • For instance, “I need to hit the books tonight to prepare for the test tomorrow.”
  • A student might say, “I’ve been hitting the books all weekend to finish my research paper.”
  • Someone might ask a friend, “Are you ready for the exam, or do you still need to hit the books?”

58. Burning daylight

This phrase implies that someone is wasting valuable time instead of being productive.

  • For example, “Stop burning daylight and start working on that report.”
  • In a conversation about procrastination, someone might say, “I can’t afford to burn daylight on this project. I need to get started.”
  • A supervisor might warn an employee, “We can’t afford to burn daylight. Let’s stay focused and finish this task.”

59. Churning it out

This phrase means to produce or complete work rapidly and in high volume.

  • For instance, “We’re churning out these reports to meet the deadline.”
  • In a discussion about productivity, someone might say, “I’ve been churning it out all day, and I’m exhausted.”
  • A coworker might compliment another by saying, “You’re really churning it out. Keep up the great work!”

60. Digging in

This phrase refers to starting a task or project with determination and focus.

  • For example, “It’s time to dig in and tackle this project.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult assignment, someone might say, “I need to dig in and figure out the best approach.”
  • A supervisor might encourage their team by saying, “Let’s dig in and show them what we’re capable of!”

61. Getting Axed

This phrase is used to describe someone losing their job, often suddenly or unexpectedly. It refers to the action of chopping down a tree with an axe, symbolizing the abrupt end of employment.

  • For example, “John got axed from his job after the company downsized.”
  • A person might say, “I’m worried about getting axed if I don’t meet my sales targets.”
  • In a conversation about job security, someone might mention, “With the current economic situation, many people are at risk of getting axed.”

62. Gig

This term is commonly used to refer to a temporary or short-term job. It can also be used to describe any type of work or employment.

  • For instance, “I just landed a gig as a freelance writer for a magazine.”
  • A musician might say, “I have a gig at a local bar tonight.”
  • In a discussion about career choices, someone might mention, “I’m considering taking on some side gigs to earn extra income.”

63. Grub

In a work context, “grub” is often used to refer to food or a meal, especially when eaten during a break or at the workplace.

  • For example, “Let’s grab some grub during our lunch break.”
  • Someone might ask, “Where can we find good grub near the office?”
  • In a conversation about office perks, a person might mention, “Our company provides free grub in the cafeteria.”

64. Nose On The Grindstone

This phrase is used to describe someone who is focused and dedicated to their work. It implies putting in long hours and exerting effort to achieve goals.

  • For instance, “She always has her nose on the grindstone, working late to meet deadlines.”
  • A coworker might say, “I admire his work ethic – he keeps his nose on the grindstone.”
  • In a discussion about productivity, someone might mention, “To succeed in this industry, you need to keep your nose on the grindstone.”

65. Pink Slip

This term refers to a notice of employment termination or layoff. It originated from the practice of using pink-colored paper for such notices.

  • For example, “He received a pink slip after the company went bankrupt.”
  • A person might say, “I’m worried about getting a pink slip if the company downsizes.”
  • In a conversation about job security, someone might mention, “Many employees live in fear of receiving a pink slip.”
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