Top 63 Slang For Yet – Meaning & Usage

The word “yet” may seem simple, but it’s actually a versatile slang term that’s gaining popularity in everyday conversations. From expressing anticipation to emphasizing a point, “yet” has become a go-to word for many. Join us as we break down the top slang uses of “yet” that will have you sounding like a language pro in no time. Don’t miss out on this chance to level up your slang game and stay ahead of the curve!

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1. Even so

This phrase is used to introduce a contrasting or contradictory statement. It implies that despite what has been said or done, the opposite is still true or relevant.

  • For example, “She failed her exam, but even so, she was accepted into the prestigious university.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I understand your point of view, but even so, I disagree with you.”
  • A person might reflect, “I know it’s risky, but even so, I want to pursue my dreams.”

2. In spite of that

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is true or happening despite a previous statement or situation. It suggests that the previous statement does not change the outcome or result.

  • For instance, “He was injured in the accident, but in spite of that, he finished the race.”
  • In a discussion about a challenging situation, someone might say, “We faced many obstacles, but in spite of that, we succeeded.”
  • A person might reflect, “I know the risks involved, but in spite of that, I’m still willing to try.”

3. On the other hand

This phrase is used to introduce a contrasting or opposing point of view. It suggests that there is a different perspective or alternative to consider.

  • For example, “She loves the beach, but on the other hand, her partner prefers the mountains.”
  • In a debate about a controversial topic, someone might say, “Some people argue for stricter gun control, but on the other hand, others believe in the right to bear arms.”
  • A person might reflect, “I enjoy traveling, but on the other hand, I also appreciate the comfort of staying home.”

4. All the same

This phrase is used to indicate that something remains true or relevant despite a previous statement or situation. It suggests that the previous statement does not change the outcome or result.

  • For instance, “He didn’t apologize, but all the same, I forgave him.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult decision, someone might say, “It’s a risky move, but all the same, I think it’s worth the gamble.”
  • A person might reflect, “I know it’s a long shot, but all the same, I’m going to give it my best effort.”

5. Be that as it may

This phrase is used to introduce a contrasting or contradictory statement. It implies that despite what has been said or done, the opposite is still true or relevant.

  • For example, “The weather forecast predicts rain, but be that as it may, I’m still going to the beach.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I understand your concerns, but be that as it may, I still believe in the importance of free speech.”
  • A person might reflect, “I know it’s a challenging task, but be that as it may, I’m determined to succeed.”

6. Even though

This phrase is used to introduce a contrasting or surprising fact or statement. It is often used to acknowledge a contradiction or to provide a reason for a particular situation.

  • For example, “Even though it was raining, we decided to go for a walk.”
  • A person might say, “Even though I’m tired, I still want to go to the party.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s achievements, one might say, “Even though she faced many obstacles, she still managed to succeed.”

7. Despite that

This phrase is used to introduce a contrast or contradiction to a previous statement. It is often used to highlight a surprising or unexpected outcome.

  • For instance, “He failed the test, but he still got into the university, despite that.”
  • A person might say, “I didn’t study, but I still managed to pass the exam, despite that.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s behavior, one might say, “He made many mistakes, but he was still promoted, despite that.”

8. Albeit

This word is used to introduce a concession or contrast to a previous statement. It is often used to acknowledge a different perspective or to provide additional information.

  • For example, “He decided to go on the trip, albeit reluctantly.”
  • A person might say, “She agreed to help, albeit with some conditions.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, one might say, “There are valid arguments on both sides, albeit with different priorities.”

9. Notwithstanding

This word is used to introduce a contrast or exception to a previous statement. It is often used to emphasize that something is true or relevant regardless of other factors.

  • For instance, “She continued with the project, notwithstanding the difficulties.”
  • A person might say, “The results were positive, notwithstanding the small sample size.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial decision, one might say, “The policy was implemented, notwithstanding the opposition from stakeholders.”

10. Even if

This phrase is used to introduce a hypothetical situation or to emphasize that something will happen or be true no matter what.

  • For example, “Even if it rains, we will still have the picnic.”
  • A person might say, “I will support you, even if others disagree.”
  • In a discussion about a risky decision, one might say, “I will take the chance, even if it means facing failure.”

11. In any case

This phrase is used to indicate that something is true or should happen no matter what the circumstances may be. It is often used to emphasize a point or to express certainty.

  • For example, “I know it’s raining, but we should go to the park in any case.”
  • In a discussion about safety precautions, someone might say, “Always wear a helmet when riding a bike, in any case.”
  • Another might argue, “Even if you’re not sure about the answer, you should still attempt the question in any case.”

12. Though

This word is used to introduce a contrasting or unexpected statement. It is often used to express a contradiction or to provide an alternative perspective.

  • For instance, “I don’t usually like spicy food, but I enjoyed the curry dish, though.”
  • In a debate about climate change, someone might say, “Though the evidence is overwhelming, there are still skeptics.”
  • Another might add, “Though it may seem difficult, we need to take action to protect the environment.”

13. Not the less

This phrase is used to indicate that something remains true or valid despite a previous statement or condition. It is often used to express a concession or to acknowledge a contrary opinion.

  • For example, “She failed the test, but she’s not the less intelligent for it.”
  • In a discussion about the importance of exercise, someone might say, “I know it’s challenging, but it’s not the less beneficial to your health.”
  • Another might argue, “The movie received mixed reviews, but it’s not the less entertaining.”

14. After all

This phrase is used to introduce a final consideration or conclusion. It is often used to emphasize a point or to express a change in perspective.

  • For instance, “I was hesitant to try the new restaurant, but it turned out to be delicious after all.”
  • In a discussion about career choices, someone might say, “Money is important, but finding fulfillment in your work is what matters after all.”
  • Another might add, “You may have doubts, but in the end, follow your passion.”

15. At the same time

This phrase is used to indicate that two or more things are happening or being considered together. It is often used to express a contrast or to highlight a dual perspective.

  • For example, “He’s a strict boss, but at the same time, he’s fair and supportive.”
  • In a discussion about balancing work and personal life, someone might say, “I want to succeed in my career, but at the same time, I value my relationships and well-being.”
  • Another might argue, “We need to address climate change, but at the same time, we must ensure economic stability.”

16. In any event

This phrase is used to indicate that something will happen or is true no matter what the circumstances may be.

  • For example, “I’m not sure if I’ll be able to go to the party, but in any event, I’ll let you know.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not expecting to win the competition, but I’ll give it my best shot in any event.”
  • Another example could be, “We might face obstacles along the way, but in any event, we will reach our destination.”

17. In any manner

This phrase is used to indicate that something can be done or achieved in any possible way.

  • For instance, “I don’t care how you do it, just get the job done in any manner.”
  • A person might say, “You can express your creativity in any manner you choose.”
  • Another example could be, “There are no restrictions on how you can solve this problem, so approach it in any manner that works for you.”

18. In any way

This phrase is used to indicate that something can be done or achieved using any method or approach.

  • For example, “I’ll support you in any way I can.”
  • A person might say, “I’m willing to go to great lengths to help you in any way.”
  • Another example could be, “You can achieve your goals in any way you see fit, as long as it’s legal and ethical.”

19. In spite of everything

This phrase is used to indicate that something will happen or is true despite any obstacles or challenges.

  • For instance, “In spite of everything, she managed to succeed.”
  • A person might say, “In spite of everything that has happened, I still believe in love.”
  • Another example could be, “In spite of everything that’s going on in the world, we can still find reasons to be hopeful.”

20. Just the same

This phrase is used to indicate that something is true or will happen despite other factors or opinions.

  • For example, “I know it’s risky, but I’m going to try it just the same.”
  • A person might say, “I disagree with your decision, but I respect it just the same.”
  • Another example could be, “We didn’t win the game, but we played our best just the same.”

21. No matter what

This phrase is used to emphasize that something will happen or be done regardless of any obstacles or challenges.

  • For example, “I will support you no matter what.”
  • In a discussion about perseverance, someone might say, “No matter what, never give up on your dreams.”
  • A motivational speaker might say, “No matter what life throws at you, keep pushing forward.”

22. Despite everything

This phrase is used to indicate that something is happening or being done despite any difficulties, obstacles, or contrary circumstances.

  • For instance, “He still loves her despite everything.”
  • In a conversation about a challenging situation, someone might say, “Despite everything, we managed to come out on top.”
  • A person reflecting on their past might say, “Despite everything I’ve been through, I’m still standing strong.”

23. Without regard to

This phrase is used to indicate that something is happening or being done without considering or taking into account a particular factor or aspect.

  • For example, “He acted without regard to the consequences.”
  • In a discussion about decision-making, someone might say, “We need to consider all the factors and not act without regard to the potential outcomes.”
  • A person criticizing someone’s actions might say, “They acted without regard to the impact it would have on others.”

24. Even with that

This phrase is used to indicate that something is happening or being done despite a particular factor or circumstance.

  • For instance, “Even with that setback, we can still succeed.”
  • In a conversation about a challenging situation, someone might say, “Even with that obstacle, we can find a way to overcome it.”
  • A person reflecting on their accomplishments might say, “Even with that difficult start, I managed to achieve my goals.”

25. Howbeit

This word is used as a formal or literary way to introduce a contrasting or contradictory statement.

  • For example, “He was tired; howbeit, he continued working.”
  • In a discussion about different perspectives, someone might say, “One person sees it as a challenge; howbeit, another sees it as an opportunity.”
  • A writer might use “howbeit” to transition between different ideas or arguments in an essay.
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26. Just as well

This phrase is used to indicate that something is true or applicable in a similar way. It can be used as a synonym for “yet” to convey the same meaning.

  • For example, “I haven’t finished my homework yet. Just as well, because I need more time.”
  • A person might say, “I haven’t decided whether to go to the party yet. Just as well, because I have other plans.”
  • Another might comment, “I haven’t heard back from the job interview yet. Just as well, because I found another opportunity.”

27. Until now

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been true or has been the case up until the present moment. It can be used as a synonym for “yet” to convey the same meaning.

  • For instance, “I haven’t found my keys yet. Until now, I’ve been searching all over the house.”
  • A person might say, “I haven’t finished reading the book yet. Until now, I’ve only read the first few chapters.”
  • Another might comment, “I haven’t received any updates on the project yet. Until now, everything has been on schedule.”

28. Up to now

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been true or has been the case up until the present moment. It can be used as a synonym for “yet” to convey the same meaning.

  • For example, “I haven’t made a decision yet. Up to now, I’ve been weighing my options.”
  • A person might say, “I haven’t seen any progress on the construction site yet. Up to now, they’ve only cleared the land.”
  • Another might comment, “I haven’t received any feedback on my presentation yet. Up to now, it’s been radio silence.”

29. Up to the present time

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been true or has been the case up until the present moment. It can be used as a synonym for “yet” to convey the same meaning.

  • For instance, “I haven’t finished my work yet. Up to the present time, I’ve been focusing on other tasks.”
  • A person might say, “I haven’t received any updates on the project yet. Up to the present time, everything has been on track.”
  • Another might comment, “I haven’t heard back from the company yet. Up to the present time, it’s been complete silence.”

30. Hitherto

This word is used to indicate that something has been true or has been the case up until the present moment. It can be used as a synonym for “yet” to convey the same meaning.

  • For example, “I haven’t finished my book yet. Hitherto, I’ve only read the first few chapters.”
  • A person might say, “I haven’t received any updates on the situation yet. Hitherto, there has been no news.”
  • Another might comment, “I haven’t made a decision yet. Hitherto, I’ve been considering all the options.”

31. Heretofore

This term refers to a time before the present moment. It is often used to indicate that something has been true or the case until now.

  • For example, “Heretofore, I have never tried sushi.”
  • In a legal context, a document might state, “Heretofore, the defendant has not been found guilty.”
  • A historian might write, “Heretofore, this artifact has never been seen by the public.”

32. So far

This phrase indicates that something has been true or the case up until the present moment.

  • For instance, “So far, I’ve enjoyed my trip to Europe.”
  • A student might say, “So far, I’ve aced all my exams this semester.”
  • A coach might comment, “So far, our team has had a successful season.”

33. As yet

This phrase is used to indicate that something has not happened or been done up until the present moment.

  • For example, “As yet, I have not received a response to my email.”
  • A person might say, “As yet, we haven’t made a decision about where to go on vacation.”
  • A team member might comment, “As yet, we haven’t finalized the project timeline.”

34. Till now

This phrase indicates that something has been true or the case until the present moment.

  • For instance, “Till now, I’ve always lived in the same city.”
  • A person might say, “Till now, I’ve never tried Indian food.”
  • A researcher might state, “Till now, this species of bird has only been found in tropical regions.”

35. To this day

This phrase indicates that something has been true or the case up until the present moment.

  • For example, “To this day, I still remember my first concert.”
  • A historian might write, “To this day, the mystery surrounding the disappearance of Amelia Earhart remains unsolved.”
  • A person might comment, “To this day, I’ve never seen a shooting star.”

36. To date

This phrase is used to indicate that something has happened or is true up until the present time. It is often used to emphasize the length of time that has passed.

  • For example, “To date, no one has been able to solve the mystery.”
  • In a conversation about achievements, one might say, “To date, she has won five gold medals.”
  • Another might comment, “To date, this is the best pizza I’ve ever had.”

37. Even then

This phrase is used to indicate that something still remains true or relevant in a particular situation, even in the face of other factors or circumstances.

  • For instance, “He never gave up, even then he faced numerous challenges.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult decision, one might say, “Even then, she knew it was the right choice.”
  • Another might comment, “The storm was raging, but even then the flowers continued to bloom.”

38. Even now

This phrase is used to emphasize that something remains true or relevant at the present time, despite the passage of time or the occurrence of other events.

  • For example, “Even now, she still thinks about him every day.”
  • In a conversation about a long-standing tradition, one might say, “Even now, people gather for this annual event.”
  • Another might comment, “The movie was released years ago, but even now it remains a classic.”

39. Up to this point

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been true or has happened until the present time, but may change or have a different outcome in the future.

  • For instance, “Up to this point, we have been successful in our efforts.”
  • In a discussion about progress, one might say, “Up to this point, we have made significant advancements.”
  • Another might comment, “The project has been on track up to this point, but there is still work to be done.”

40. Up to this moment

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been true or has occurred until the present moment, but may change or have a different outcome in the future.

  • For example, “Up to this moment, he has always been there for me.”
  • In a conversation about a relationship, one might say, “Up to this moment, everything has been perfect.”
  • Another might comment, “Up to this moment, I have never experienced anything like this before.”

41. Up to this time

This phrase is used to indicate that something has not happened or been completed at the current moment.

  • For example, “I haven’t finished my report up to this time.”
  • A person might say, “Up to this time, I haven’t received any updates on the project.”
  • In a conversation about a delayed package, someone might ask, “Has it arrived up to this time?”

42. Up to the present

This phrase is used to express that something has not occurred or reached a certain point at the current moment.

  • For instance, “The issue hasn’t been resolved up to the present.”
  • A person might say, “Up to the present, I haven’t found a solution to the problem.”
  • In a discussion about a ongoing situation, someone might ask, “What has been done up to the present to address the issue?”

43. Up to the present moment

This phrase is used to convey that something has not happened or been completed at the current moment.

  • For example, “I haven’t received any updates up to the present moment.”
  • A person might say, “Up to the present moment, I haven’t made a decision about the offer.”
  • In a conversation about a project, someone might ask, “What has been accomplished up to the present moment?”

44. Up to the present point

This phrase is used to indicate that something has not occurred or reached a certain stage at the current moment.

  • For instance, “The investigation hasn’t yielded any results up to the present point.”
  • A person might say, “Up to the present point, we haven’t finalized the details of the event.”
  • In a discussion about a process, someone might ask, “What has been achieved up to the present point?”

45. Up to the present stage

This phrase is used to express that something has not happened or progressed to a certain stage at the current moment.

  • For example, “The project hasn’t advanced up to the present stage.”
  • A person might say, “Up to the present stage, we haven’t received any feedback on the proposal.”
  • In a conversation about a performance, someone might ask, “What has been rehearsed up to the present stage?”

46. Up to the present period

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been happening or is true until the current point in time.

  • For example, “I haven’t finished my report up to the present period.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been working on this project up to the present period, and I’m almost done.”
  • In a discussion about a long-running TV series, someone might comment, “The show has been on the air up to the present period, and it’s still going strong.”

47. Up to the present phase

This phrase suggests that something has been progressing or evolving until the current phase or stage.

  • For instance, “The project has been going well up to the present phase.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been studying up to the present phase, and I feel confident about the upcoming exam.”
  • In a conversation about a renovation project, someone might mention, “We’ve completed the demolition up to the present phase, and now we’re moving on to the construction.”

48. Up to the present juncture

This phrase emphasizes that something has been happening or is true until the current juncture or point in time.

  • For example, “The negotiations have been productive up to the present juncture.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been following the news up to the present juncture, and it’s been quite eventful.”
  • In a discussion about a long-term relationship, someone might comment, “We’ve been together up to the present juncture, and we’re still going strong.”

49. Up to the present instant

This phrase indicates that something has been occurring or is true until the current instant or exact point in time.

  • For instance, “I haven’t received any updates up to the present instant.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been waiting for the bus up to the present instant, and it’s still not here.”
  • In a conversation about a live event, someone might mention, “The performer has been captivating the audience up to the present instant.”

50. Up to the present hour

This phrase highlights that something has been happening or is true until the current hour.

  • For example, “I haven’t made any progress on my project up to the present hour.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been working tirelessly up to the present hour, and I need a break.”
  • In a discussion about a business’s financial performance, someone might comment, “The company has been profitable up to the present hour.”

51. Up to the present minute

This phrase is used to indicate that something is still ongoing or has not happened as of now.

  • For example, “I haven’t finished my work up to the present minute.”
  • Someone might say, “I’ve been waiting for the bus up to the present minute.”
  • A person discussing a project might mention, “The deadline is up to the present minute, so we still have time to make changes.”

52. Up to the present second

Similar to the previous phrase, this expression emphasizes that something is still ongoing or has not occurred as of now.

  • For instance, “I haven’t eaten anything up to the present second.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been studying for the exam up to the present second.”
  • In a conversation about a missed opportunity, someone might mention, “I regret not taking that job up to the present second.”

53. Up to the present day

This phrase indicates that something has been happening or has been true until the current moment.

  • For example, “The tradition has been passed down up to the present day.”
  • A historian might say, “These customs have been practiced up to the present day.”
  • In a discussion about a long-lasting conflict, someone might mention, “The tension between the two countries continues up to the present day.”

54. Up to the present week

This phrase suggests that something has been ongoing or has not occurred until the current week.

  • For instance, “I haven’t received any updates up to the present week.”
  • Someone might say, “I’ve been saving money up to the present week.”
  • In a conversation about a delayed project, a person might mention, “The deliverables haven’t been submitted up to the present week.”

55. Up to the present month

This expression emphasizes that something has been happening or has not happened until the current month.

  • For example, “I haven’t seen any progress up to the present month.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been working on this task up to the present month.”
  • In a conversation about a goal, someone might mention, “I haven’t achieved it up to the present month.”

56. Up to the present year

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been happening or is true until the current year.

  • For example, “I have been working at this company up to the present year.”
  • A person might say, “I have been living in this city up to the present year.”
  • In a discussion about trends, someone might mention, “Up to the present year, this fashion style has been popular.”

57. Up to the present decade

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been happening or is true until the current decade.

  • For instance, “I have been following this band up to the present decade.”
  • A person might say, “I have been using this technology up to the present decade.”
  • In a conversation about music, someone might mention, “Up to the present decade, rock and roll has influenced many genres.”

58. Up to the present century

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been happening or is true until the current century.

  • For example, “I have been studying history up to the present century.”
  • A person might say, “I have been practicing medicine up to the present century.”
  • In a discussion about literature, someone might mention, “Up to the present century, Shakespeare’s works continue to be studied and performed.”

59. Up to the present millennium

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been happening or is true until the current millennium.

  • For instance, “I have been collecting coins up to the present millennium.”
  • A person might say, “I have been studying ancient civilizations up to the present millennium.”
  • In a conversation about technology, someone might mention, “Up to the present millennium, the internet has revolutionized communication.”

60. Up to the present era

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been happening or is true until the current era.

  • For example, “I have been researching art history up to the present era.”
  • A person might say, “I have been studying politics up to the present era.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might mention, “Up to the present era, minimalism has been a popular style.”

61. Up to the present epoch

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been true or has existed until the current time or era.

  • For example, “The company has been profitable up to the present epoch.”
  • In a historical discussion, one might say, “Up to the present epoch, humans have made significant advancements in technology.”
  • A scientist might state, “Our understanding of the universe up to the present epoch has been limited.”

62. Up to the present age

Similar to the previous phrase, this slang is used to indicate that something has been true or has existed until the current time or era.

  • For instance, “The traditions of the past have been preserved up to the present age.”
  • In a discussion about societal changes, one might say, “Up to the present age, gender roles have evolved.”
  • A historian might mention, “Up to the present age, civilizations have risen and fallen.”

63. That being said

This phrase is used to introduce a contrasting or qualifying statement after making a previous statement.

  • For example, “I understand your point, but that being said, I still disagree.”
  • In a debate, one might say, “That being said, we should consider the potential consequences of our actions.”
  • A writer might use this phrase to transition to a new topic, saying, “That being said, let’s now discuss the impact of technology on society.”