Top 38 Slang For $100 Dollars Crossword – Meaning & Usage

Crosswords, a beloved pastime for many, are a great way to test your knowledge and challenge your brain. But what if we told you there’s a crossword that not only exercises your mental muscles but also introduces you to the latest and trendiest slang words for $100 dollars? Get ready to dive into this unique crossword that combines the thrill of solving clues with the excitement of discovering new slang. Whether you’re a crossword enthusiast or a language lover, this listicle is sure to keep you entertained and expand your vocabulary at the same time!

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1. Hundo

This term is a shortened version of “hundred” and is used to refer to a one hundred dollar bill. It is often used in casual or slang contexts.

  • For example, someone might say, “I owe you a hundo for that concert ticket.”
  • In a conversation about money, a person might ask, “Can you lend me a hundo until payday?”
  • A friend might joke, “I’ll bet you a hundo that I can beat you in a game of pool.”

2. C-Note

This term is derived from the Roman numeral for 100, “C,” and is used to refer to a one hundred dollar bill. It is a common slang term for this denomination.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to break this C-note to pay for dinner.”
  • In a discussion about cash, a person might mention, “I found a C-note on the sidewalk today.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you spot me a C-note until I get my paycheck?”

3. Benjamin

This term is named after Benjamin Franklin, whose portrait appears on the one hundred dollar bill. It is a popular slang term for this denomination.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just got paid, and I’ve got a few Benjamins in my wallet.”
  • In a conversation about money, a person might ask, “Do you have any Benjamins on you?”
  • A friend might comment, “I wish I could afford to spend Benjamins like it’s nothing.”

4. Century

This term is derived from the word “century,” which traditionally refers to a period of one hundred years. In slang, it is used to refer to one hundred dollars.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I paid a century for this new pair of sneakers.”
  • In a discussion about money, a person might mention, “I’ve been saving up, and now I’ve got a century to spend.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me a century? I’ll pay you back next week.”

5. Big ones

This term is a colloquial way of referring to one hundred dollars. The phrase “big ones” is used to emphasize the value or significance of the amount.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made a deal and earned a couple of big ones.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might mention, “I need to save up some big ones for my vacation.”
  • A friend might comment, “I can’t believe he spent all those big ones on a fancy dinner.”

6. Blue cheese

This slang term refers to $100 bills. It is derived from the blue color of the new $100 bill design that was introduced in 2009.

  • For example, “I just found a blue cheese in my pocket!”
  • A person might say, “I need some blue cheese to pay for this expensive dinner.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might mention, “I’ve been saving up, and now I have a stack of blue cheese.”

7. Franklin

This term is a reference to Benjamin Franklin, whose portrait appears on the $100 bill. It is used as slang for a $100 bill.

  • For instance, “I can’t believe I found a Franklin on the ground!”
  • In a discussion about cash, someone might say, “I need to withdraw some Franklins from the bank.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have change for a Franklin?”

8. Greenback

This slang term refers to U.S. currency, particularly paper money. It originated from the green color of the ink used on the back of U.S. banknotes.

  • For example, “I need some greenbacks to pay for this concert ticket.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I’m running low on greenbacks.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me some greenbacks until payday?”

9. Large

This term is often used to refer to a $100 bill. It comes from the fact that the number “100” is commonly associated with being a large amount of money.

  • For instance, “I can’t believe I just found a large in my old jacket!”
  • In a discussion about cash, someone might say, “I need to break this large into smaller bills.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you give me change for a large?”

10. Rack

While “rack” is a slang term for $1000, it is sometimes used in reference to a stack of $100 bills, which would total $1000.

  • For example, “I just won a rack at the casino!”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might say, “I need to save up for a new car, I’m aiming for a rack.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me a rack? I’ll pay you back next month.”

11. Benjamin Franklin

This slang term refers to the image of Benjamin Franklin, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, who is featured on the $100 bill. It is often used to casually refer to a $100 bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t believe I found a Benjamin Franklin in my old jacket pocket!”
  • In a conversation about money, a person might mention, “I need to save up a few Benjamin Franklins for my vacation.”
  • A person showing off their wealth might say, “I make it rain Benjamin Franklins!”

12. Big face

This slang term is used to refer to a $100 bill, emphasizing the large face value of the denomination.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just got paid, and I’ve got a big face to spend!”
  • In a conversation about money, a person might say, “I need some big faces to pay for this expensive dinner.”
  • A person bragging about their wealth might say, “I’ve got big faces in my wallet, no problem!”

13. Big money

This slang term is used to describe a significant amount of money, often emphasizing wealth or financial success.

  • For example, someone might say, “If you invest wisely, you can make big money.”
  • In a conversation about a successful business, a person might say, “They’re making big money with their new product.”
  • A person talking about their aspirations might say, “I’m going to make it big and earn big money!”

14. Double sawbuck

This slang term is used to refer to a $20 bill. The term “sawbuck” is slang for a $10 bill, so “double sawbuck” emphasizes the value of a $20 bill.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I only have a double sawbuck left in my wallet.”
  • In a conversation about splitting a bill, a person might say, “I’ll give you a double sawbuck for my share.”
  • A person discussing their cash flow might say, “I need to break this double sawbuck to pay for groceries.”

15. One hundo

This slang term is used to refer to either a $100 bill or to express 100% certainty or agreement.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just won one hundo at the casino!”
  • In a conversation about a perfect score, a person might say, “I aced that test and got a one hundo!”
  • A person showing full confidence in a decision might say, “I’m one hundo percent sure this is the right choice.”

16. Bigwig

This term refers to someone who holds a high-ranking or influential position, often in business or politics. It is used to describe individuals who have a significant amount of power or authority.

  • For example, in a corporate setting, someone might say, “The bigwig from headquarters is coming to visit.”
  • In a political context, a news article might mention, “The bigwigs of the party gathered for a strategy meeting.”
  • A person discussing influential figures might comment, “The bigwigs of the tech industry are shaping the future of innovation.”

17. Cabbage

This slang term is used to refer to money, particularly cash. It is often used casually or in a lighthearted manner.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to save up some cabbage for my vacation.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might ask, “How much cabbage do you have in your wallet?”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “I’m short on cabbage, can you spot me for lunch?”

18. Dead president

This phrase is slang for paper currency, specifically referring to the portraits of deceased U.S. presidents that appear on various denominations of bills. It is a colloquial way of referring to money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve got a few dead presidents in my wallet.”
  • In a discussion about payment, a person might ask, “Can you give me some dead presidents for this item?”
  • A friend might joke, “I need to find a job that pays me in dead presidents.”

19. Big one

This term is used to refer to a $100 bill. It is a casual way of mentioning the denomination.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I found a big one in my jacket pocket.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, a person might ask, “Can you break a big one for me?”
  • A friend might comment, “I wish I had a big one to spend on this shopping spree.”

20. Blue face

This slang term is used to refer to a $100 bill, which features a blue hue on the background of the front side. It is a way of referencing the color of the bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve got some blue face in my wallet.”
  • In a discussion about money, a person might ask, “Do you have any blue face on you?”
  • A friend might exclaim, “I just found a blue face on the street!”

21. C-spot

The “C-spot” is a slang term for a hundred-dollar bill. It is derived from the letter “C” which represents the Roman numeral for 100. The term is often used in informal conversations or when referring to large amounts of money.

  • For example, “I just found a C-spot in my pocket!”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up a few C-spots to buy that new gadget.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might mention, “It’s always satisfying to see a C-spot in your bank account.”

22. Hundo P

The term “Hundo P” is a slang way of saying “one hundred dollars.” It is a casual and abbreviated form used in everyday conversations or when referring to the value of money.

  • For instance, “I paid a hundo P for this shirt.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up a few hundo P’s for my vacation.”
  • In a discussion about expenses, someone might mention, “I spent over a hundo P on groceries this month.”

23. Big Hitter

The term “Big Hitter” is a slang way of saying “one hundred dollars.” It is often used informally or in casual conversations to refer to the value of money.

  • For example, “I just made a big hitter with my latest freelance gig!”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up a few big hitters to buy that new gadget.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, someone might mention, “I want to save at least five big hitters by the end of the year.”

24. One Stack

The term “One Stack” is a slang way of saying “one hundred dollars.” It is derived from the idea of a stack of bills, where each bill represents a certain value. “One Stack” refers to a stack of one hundred-dollar bills.

  • For instance, “I just made a one stack from selling my old video games.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up a few one stacks to afford that concert ticket.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might mention, “I try to put away at least one stack every month.”

25. C-Note Stack

The term “C-Note Stack” is a slang way of saying “one hundred dollars.” It combines the letter “C” which represents the Roman numeral for 100 and the term “Note” which is another word for a bill or banknote. The phrase “C-Note Stack” refers to a stack of one hundred-dollar bills.

  • For example, “I just made a C-note stack from my side hustle.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up a few C-note stacks to buy that new gadget.”
  • In a discussion about financial milestones, someone might mention, “I want to have a C-note stack in my emergency fund.”

26. Benjamin Stack

This term refers to a stack of $100 bills, with each bill featuring a portrait of Benjamin Franklin. It implies a large sum of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made a Benjamin stack from my side hustle.”
  • In a conversation about financial goals, someone might mention, “I’m saving up for a Benjamin stack.”
  • A person bragging about their wealth might say, “I always carry a Benjamin stack in my wallet.”

27. Benjamin Bundle

Similar to a Benjamin stack, this term refers to a bundle of $100 bills. It implies a significant amount of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just made a Benjamin bundle from my business venture.”
  • In a discussion about luxury purchases, someone might mention, “I bought a new car and paid with a Benjamin bundle.”
  • A person describing a large cash transaction might say, “He handed me a Benjamin bundle as payment.”

28. Hundo Stack

This term is a shorthand way of saying “hundred stack,” referring to a stack of $100 bills. It implies a substantial amount of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made a hundo stack from my investments.”
  • In a conversation about financial success, someone might mention, “I’m aiming to have a hundo stack in my savings account.”
  • A person bragging about their wealth might say, “I can make it rain with a hundo stack.”

29. Blue Face Stack

This term refers to a stack of $100 bills, with the bills featuring a blue face. It implies a significant amount of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just made a blue face stack from my business deal.”
  • In a discussion about financial aspirations, someone might mention, “I want to save up for a blue face stack.”
  • A person boasting about their wealth might say, “I can flex with a blue face stack.”

30. Franklin Stack

This term refers to a stack of $100 bills, with each bill featuring a portrait of Benjamin Franklin. It implies a large sum of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made a Franklin stack from my side hustle.”
  • In a conversation about financial goals, someone might mention, “I’m saving up for a Franklin stack.”
  • A person bragging about their wealth might say, “I always carry a Franklin stack in my wallet.”

31. Big Hitter Stack

This term refers to a large stack of $100 bills, symbolizing a significant amount of money. It is often used to describe someone who is wealthy or has a lot of cash on hand.

  • For example, “He walked into the club with a big hitter stack, ready to make it rain.”
  • In a discussion about finances, one might say, “If you want to buy that car, you better have a big hitter stack.”
  • A person showing off their money might boast, “Check out my big hitter stack, ballin’!”

32. One Rack

This slang term simply refers to the amount of one hundred dollars. It is a shortened version of “one hundred rack” or “one hundred dollars.”

  • For instance, “I just spent one rack on a new pair of sneakers.”
  • When discussing prices, one might say, “It’s gonna cost you one rack to get that fixed.”
  • A person bragging about their spending might say, “I dropped one rack at the mall today.”

33. C-Note Rack

This term combines the letter “C” (the Roman numeral for 100) with “note” (a common term for a bill), and “rack” (slang for a stack of money). It refers to a stack of $100 bills.

  • For example, “He pulled out a C-note rack to pay for the meal.”
  • When discussing finances, one might say, “I need to save up a C-note rack for my vacation.”
  • A person showing off their money might say, “I’ve got a C-note rack in my pocket right now.”

34. Benjamin Rack

This term is named after Benjamin Franklin, whose portrait is featured on the $100 bill. It refers to a stack of $100 bills.

  • For instance, “He flashed a Benjamin rack to impress his friends.”
  • When discussing wealth, one might say, “She’s got a Benjamin rack in her safe.”
  • A person showing off their money might say, “I always carry a Benjamin rack with me.”

35. Benji

This slang term is derived from the name “Benjamin,” which is the first name of Benjamin Franklin, whose portrait is featured on the $100 bill. It is used to refer to a $100 bill.

  • For example, “He paid for the concert tickets with a Benji.”
  • When discussing money, one might say, “I need to withdraw some Benjis from the ATM.”
  • A person showing off their money might say, “I’ve got a pocket full of Benjis.”

36. Big boy

This is a term used to refer to a one hundred dollar bill. It is often used in a casual or slang context.

  • For example, “I can’t believe I found a big boy in my pocket!”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up some big boys for my vacation.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I wish I had a stack of big boys.”

37. Franklin’s portrait

This term refers to the portrait of Benjamin Franklin, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, that is featured on the one hundred dollar bill.

  • For instance, “I always feel a little richer when I see Franklin’s portrait.”
  • When discussing the design of the one hundred dollar bill, someone might say, “I think Franklin’s portrait is one of the most recognizable in U.S. currency.”
  • A person might mention, “I remember when they redesigned Franklin’s portrait on the bill.”

38. Hundred spot

This term is another way to refer to a one hundred dollar bill. It is a slang term often used in informal conversations.

  • For example, “I need to break a hundred spot to pay for this.”
  • A person might say, “I found a couple of hundred spots in my jacket pocket.”
  • In a discussion about money, someone might ask, “Do you have any change for a hundred spot?”
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