Top 53 Slang For Opiods – Meaning & Usage

The opioid crisis is a pressing issue that requires awareness and understanding. That’s why our team has put together a comprehensive list of slang terms for opioids. By familiarizing ourselves with these terms, we can better recognize and address the problem. Join us as we delve into this important topic and shed light on the language surrounding opioids.

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1. Oxy

Oxy is a slang term for oxycodone, which is a powerful opioid painkiller. It is commonly prescribed for moderate to severe pain relief.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to pick up my oxy prescription from the pharmacy.”
  • In a discussion about opioid addiction, someone might mention, “OxyContin is a brand name for extended-release oxycodone.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I started abusing oxy after a surgery and it quickly spiraled into addiction.”

2. Roxy

Roxy is a slang term for roxicodone, which is a brand name for the opioid painkiller oxycodone. It is a potent narcotic used for pain relief.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I scored some roxys from my friend.”
  • In a conversation about opioid abuse, someone might mention, “Roxy is often sold on the black market and can be dangerous when misused.”
  • A person sharing their story might say, “I started taking roxys recreationally and it quickly became a daily habit.”

3. Percs

Percs is a slang term for Percocet, which is a prescription pain medication containing a combination of oxycodone and acetaminophen. It is used to treat moderate to severe pain.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been prescribed percocets after my surgery.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of opioid addiction, someone might mention, “Percs are highly addictive and can lead to dependence.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I started abusing percocets to numb emotional pain, and it only made things worse.”

4. Vikes

Vikes is a slang term for Vicodin, which is a brand name for the combination of hydrocodone and acetaminophen. It is a prescription painkiller used to relieve moderate to severe pain.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ve been taking vikes for my back pain.”
  • In a conversation about the prevalence of opioid abuse, someone might mention, “Vicodin is one of the most commonly abused prescription drugs.”
  • A person sharing their story might say, “I started using vikes recreationally in college and it quickly spiraled into addiction.”

5. Blues

Blues is a slang term for oxycodone, which is a powerful opioid painkiller. It is often referred to as blues due to the blue color of some oxycodone pills.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been taking blues to manage my chronic pain.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of opioid addiction, someone might mention, “The illicit market for blues is thriving.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I started using blues to escape emotional pain, but it only made things worse.”

6. Beans

Beans is a slang term used to refer to methadone, a synthetic opioid medication often used in the treatment of opioid addiction. The term “beans” is derived from the appearance of methadone tablets, which are small and round, resembling beans.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going to pick up my beans from the pharmacy today.”
  • In a discussion about opioid treatment options, someone might mention, “Methadone, also known as beans, can be an effective tool in recovery.”
  • A recovering opioid addict might share their experience by saying, “I started on beans to help me get off heroin.”

7. Hillbilly heroin

Hillbilly heroin is a slang term used to refer to oxycodone, a powerful opioid pain medication. The term “hillbilly heroin” is often used to highlight the widespread misuse and addiction to oxycodone in rural areas, where the opioid crisis has had a significant impact.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I can’t believe how many people are hooked on hillbilly heroin in this town.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid epidemic, someone might mention, “Hillbilly heroin is causing devastation in many rural communities.”
  • A news article might report, “The abuse of hillbilly heroin continues to rise, leading to an increase in overdose deaths.”

8. Lean

Lean is a slang term used to refer to a recreational beverage made by mixing prescription-strength cough syrup containing codeine and promethazine with soda, typically a fruit-flavored one. The term “lean” comes from the way the drink can make a person feel relaxed or “leaned” back.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m sipping on some lean to help me relax.”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, someone might mention, “Lean is a dangerous concoction that can lead to addiction and health problems.”
  • A rapper might reference lean in their lyrics, saying, “I’m sippin’ on that purple stuff, lean got me feeling tough.”

9. Tram

Tram is a slang term used to refer to tramadol, a prescription opioid medication used to treat moderate to severe pain. The term “tram” is derived from the first part of the drug’s name.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I have a prescription for tram for my chronic pain.”
  • In a discussion about pain management, someone might mention, “Tram is often prescribed as a less potent alternative to stronger opioids.”
  • A doctor might warn about the potential risks of tramadol, saying, “While tram can be effective for pain relief, it also carries a risk of dependence and side effects.”

10. Dope

Dope is a slang term used to refer to heroin, a highly addictive opioid drug derived from morphine. The term “dope” is often used to describe any illicit drug, but it specifically refers to heroin in the context of opioids.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s hooked on dope and needs help.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid crisis, someone might mention, “The availability of cheap dope has led to a surge in overdose deaths.”
  • A recovering addict might share their story by saying, “I hit rock bottom when I was using dope, but now I’m in recovery.”

11. Smack

A slang term for heroin, a powerful opioid drug derived from morphine. “Smack” is often used to refer to the physical act of injecting heroin into the veins.

  • For example, a person might say, “He’s addicted to smack and needs help.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, someone might ask, “Have you ever tried smack?”
  • A news article might describe a drug bust, stating, “Police seized a large quantity of smack during the raid.”

12. H

Another slang term for heroin, derived from the first letter of the word. “H” is often used in text messages or online discussions to discreetly refer to the drug.

  • For instance, a person might text, “Can you hook me up with some H?”
  • In a drug-related forum, someone might post, “I’m struggling with addiction to H. Any advice?”
  • A person discussing the dangers of drug use might say, “H is a highly addictive substance that can lead to serious health problems.”

13. Junk

A colloquial term for heroin, often used to describe the drug’s addictive nature and the detrimental effects it has on users. “Junk” refers to the idea that heroin is a worthless substance that ruins lives.

  • For example, a person might say, “He’s hooked on junk and needs help.”
  • In a conversation about drug rehabilitation, someone might ask, “Have you ever tried to quit junk?”
  • A documentary about drug abuse might feature interviews with former addicts discussing their experiences with junk.
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14. White girl

While not directly related to opioids, “white girl” is a slang term commonly used to refer to cocaine, a stimulant drug. The term “white girl” is derived from the color and purity of powdered cocaine, which is often white.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He’s been partying with white girl all night.”
  • In a discussion about drug culture, someone might mention, “White girl is a highly addictive and dangerous substance.”
  • A news article might report, “Police seized a large quantity of white girl during a drug bust.”

15. Tar

A specific form of heroin that is dark and sticky in appearance, resembling black tar. “Tar” is often used to refer to this type of heroin, which is typically produced in Mexico and sold in the western United States.

  • For example, a person might say, “He’s addicted to tar and needs help.”
  • In a conversation about drug trafficking, someone might ask, “Have you ever encountered tar?”
  • A news report might state, “Authorities seized a significant amount of tar during a drug raid.”

16. Boy

Boy is a slang term for heroin, a highly addictive opioid drug derived from morphine. It is typically used to refer to the drug itself or to a small amount of heroin.

  • For example, a drug user might say, “I need some boy to get through the day.”
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, someone might mention, “He’s been hooked on boy for years.”
  • A news article might describe a drug bust where police seized “a significant amount of boy.”

17. China white

China white is a slang term for fentanyl, a synthetic opioid that is many times more potent than heroin. It is often used to describe a white powder or pill form of fentanyl.

  • For instance, a drug dealer might advertise, “I’ve got some China white for sale.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid epidemic, someone might say, “China white is causing a lot of overdoses in our community.”
  • A news report might mention the dangers of counterfeit pills laced with “deadly China white.”

18. Fent

Fent is a shortened slang term for fentanyl, a synthetic opioid that is highly potent and often mixed with other drugs. It is commonly used among drug users and dealers.

  • For example, someone might ask, “You know where I can get some fent?”
  • In a conversation about the dangers of opioids, a concerned parent might say, “My son got hooked on fent and it almost killed him.”
  • A news headline might read, “Increase in fent-related deaths prompts urgent action.”

19. Apache

Apache is a slang term for heroin, a highly addictive opioid drug derived from morphine. It is often used to refer to a specific type or quality of heroin.

  • For instance, a drug user might say, “I got some good Apache, want to try?”
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, someone might mention, “He’s been chasing the Apache dragon for years.”
  • A news report might mention the seizure of a large quantity of “high-grade Apache.”

20. Tango and Cash

Tango and Cash is a slang term used to refer to a combination of heroin and cocaine, usually mixed together and injected. It is a dangerous and potentially lethal combination of drugs.

  • For example, a drug user might say, “I’m going to score some Tango and Cash tonight.”
  • In a conversation about the risks of drug use, someone might mention, “Tango and Cash is a deadly cocktail.”
  • A news article might report on a drug overdose involving “a lethal dose of Tango and Cash.”

21. M30

M30 refers to a specific type of oxycodone pill that contains 30 milligrams of the drug. It is a commonly abused opioid pain medication.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found some M30s in my friend’s medicine cabinet.”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, a person might mention, “M30s are highly sought after for their euphoric effects.”
  • A warning sign of addiction could be, “If someone is constantly seeking M30s, they may have a problem.”

22. 30s

This term is used to refer to oxycodone pills that contain 30 milligrams of the drug. It is a common slang term used among opioid users.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to pick up some 30s from my dealer.”
  • In a conversation about opioid addiction, a person might say, “Many people start with 30s and then move on to stronger drugs.”
  • A warning sign of drug abuse could be, “If someone is constantly talking about getting their hands on 30s, they may have a problem.”

23. Norco

Norco is a brand name for a combination medication that contains hydrocodone and acetaminophen. It is commonly prescribed for moderate to severe pain.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just got a prescription for Norco after my dental surgery.”
  • In a discussion about pain management, a person might mention, “Norco can be effective for short-term pain relief, but it should be used cautiously.”
  • A warning sign of misuse could be, “If someone is taking more Norco than prescribed or seeking it from multiple doctors, they may be abusing the medication.”

24. Watsons

Watsons is a slang term used to refer to generic hydrocodone/acetaminophen combination pills. It is derived from the Watson Pharmaceuticals brand, which used to produce these pills.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I prefer Watsons over the brand-name Norcos.”
  • In a conversation about opioid addiction, a person might say, “Watsons are commonly abused due to their availability and affordability.”
  • A warning sign of drug misuse could be, “If someone is constantly seeking Watsons or trying to obtain them illegally, they may have a problem.”

25. Tuss

Tuss is a slang term used to refer to prescription cough syrup that contains codeine. It is often abused for its sedative and euphoric effects.

  • For example, someone might say, “I got some Tuss from my doctor for my cough, but I heard it can make you feel really good.”
  • In a discussion about substance abuse, a person might mention, “Tuss is a common drug of abuse among young people.”
  • A warning sign of addiction could be, “If someone is constantly seeking Tuss or exhibiting changes in behavior after taking it, they may be addicted.”

26. Hillbilly speedball

This term refers to the dangerous practice of mixing heroin and methamphetamine, usually by injecting both drugs together. It is called a “speedball” because it combines the sedative effects of heroin with the stimulant effects of methamphetamine. The term “hillbilly” is often used to refer to rural, working-class individuals who may be more prone to substance abuse.

  • For example, someone might say, “He overdosed after doing a hillbilly speedball.”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, a user might warn, “Mixing heroin and meth is extremely dangerous. Avoid hillbilly speedballs.”
  • Another might ask, “Has anyone tried a hillbilly speedball? What are the effects like?”

27. Cheese

This term refers to the combination of heroin and over-the-counter cold medicine, specifically one that contains diphenhydramine. The cold medicine is crushed and mixed with heroin before being injected. The term “cheese” is often used in urban areas, particularly among young people.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He got caught with cheese in his possession.”
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, a user might ask, “What are the dangers of using cheese?”
  • Another might share a personal experience, “I used to be addicted to cheese, but I’ve been clean for two years now.”

28. OC

This term is an abbreviation for OxyContin, which is a brand name for the prescription opioid painkiller oxycodone. OxyContin is a highly addictive drug that is often abused for its euphoric effects. The abbreviation “OC” is commonly used in online forums and among individuals familiar with opioid slang.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s addicted to OC.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid epidemic, a user might comment, “OC is one of the most commonly abused prescription drugs.”
  • Another might ask, “How can we help someone struggling with OC addiction?”

29. Fizzies

This term refers to oxycodone pills, which are a type of opioid painkiller. The term “fizzies” is often used to describe the fizzing sound the pills make when crushed and snorted. It is a slang term commonly used among individuals who abuse opioids.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s always carrying around a bottle of fizzies.”
  • In a conversation about the dangers of opioid abuse, a user might warn, “Fizzies can lead to addiction and overdose.”
  • Another might ask, “Where can I find help for someone addicted to fizzies?”

30. Captain Cody

This term refers to codeine cough syrup, which contains the opioid codeine. The term “Captain Cody” is a slang term often used to describe codeine cough syrup, particularly among individuals who abuse it for its euphoric effects. The name “Cody” is a reference to the brand name “Tylenol with Codeine” (T3), which is commonly associated with codeine cough syrup.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s sipping on Captain Cody.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of cough syrup abuse, a user might comment, “Captain Cody can be highly addictive.”
  • Another might share a personal story, “I used to be hooked on Captain Cody, but I’ve been clean for a year now.”

31. Cody

Codeine is a narcotic pain medication that is used to treat mild to moderate pain. It is derived from the opium poppy plant and is often prescribed in pill form.

  • For example, a person might say, “I took a Cody to help with my headache.”
  • In a discussion about pain management, someone might ask, “Has anyone tried Cody for chronic pain?”
  • A doctor might prescribe Cody to a patient, saying, “Take one pill every 4-6 hours as needed for pain relief.”

32. Schoolboy

Heroin is a highly addictive opioid drug that is synthesized from morphine. It is typically sold as a white or brown powder or as a black sticky substance known as black tar heroin.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He used to be a straight-A student, but now he’s just a schoolboy.”
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, someone might share their experience with heroin, saying, “I was a schoolboy for years before I finally got clean.”
  • A parent might express concern for their child, saying, “I’m worried that my son is using schoolboy.”

33. Tootsie roll

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that is 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine. It is typically used to treat severe pain, but it is also illegally produced and sold on the black market.

  • For example, a person might say, “He was found dead with a tootsie roll in his pocket.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid crisis, someone might mention the prevalence of tootsie roll overdoses.
  • A news article might report, “Authorities seized a large quantity of tootsie roll in a recent drug bust.”

34. Juice

Juice is a slang term used to refer to opioids, which are a class of drugs that include prescription pain relievers, synthetic opioids, and heroin.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need some juice to numb the pain.”
  • In a conversation about drug abuse, someone might share their struggle with juice addiction.
  • A doctor might ask a patient, “Have you been using juice to manage your pain?”

35. Pancakes and syrup

Pancakes and syrup is a slang term used to refer to opioids, which are a class of drugs that include prescription pain relievers, synthetic opioids, and heroin.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m craving some pancakes and syrup.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of opioid addiction, someone might mention the allure of pancakes and syrup.
  • A news headline might read, “Authorities seize large quantities of pancakes and syrup in drug busts.”

36. Purple drank

A recreational beverage made by combining prescription-strength cough syrup, soda, and sometimes hard candy. The drink contains codeine, a narcotic opioid that produces a sedative and euphoric effect when consumed in large amounts.

  • For example, “He mixed some cough syrup with soda to make purple drank.”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, someone might say, “Purple drank is a dangerous concoction that can lead to addiction and health problems.”
  • A person sharing their experience might mention, “I tried purple drank once at a party and felt extremely relaxed and drowsy.”

37. Sizzurp

Also known as “purple drank” or “lean,” sizzurp is a recreational drug made by mixing prescription-strength cough syrup, soda, and sometimes hard candy. The term “sizzurp” is often used in hip-hop culture and popularized in songs and music videos.

  • For instance, a rapper might boast about sippin’ on sizzurp in their lyrics.
  • In a conversation about drug trends, someone might ask, “Have you heard of sizzurp? It’s becoming popular among young people.”
  • A person discussing the dangers of drug abuse might say, “Sizzurp can lead to respiratory depression and other serious health problems.”

38. Lean on a stick

A slang term for purple drank, referring to the practice of pouring the codeine-based drink into a styrofoam cup and leaning it against a stick or object for support. The term is often used in hip-hop culture and references the act of consuming the drink in a leisurely manner.

  • For example, “He was seen sipping on lean on a stick at the party.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, someone might mention, “The prevalence of lean on a stick among young people is concerning.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I tried lean on a stick once and felt a strong sense of relaxation and euphoria.”

39. Purple jelly

Another name for purple drank, purple jelly refers to the codeine-based drink made by mixing prescription-strength cough syrup, soda, and sometimes hard candy. The term “purple jelly” is often used in urban communities and references the purple color of the drink.

  • For instance, a person might ask, “Where can I get some purple jelly?”
  • In a conversation about drug abuse, someone might say, “Purple jelly is a dangerous concoction that can lead to addiction and health problems.”
  • A person sharing their experience might mention, “I’ve heard about people getting hooked on purple jelly and it’s really sad.”

40. Purple stuff

Purple stuff is a slang term used to refer to purple drank, a recreational beverage made by combining prescription-strength cough syrup, soda, and sometimes hard candy. The term “purple stuff” is often used casually and may not explicitly reference the codeine-based nature of the drink.

  • For example, a person might ask, “You got any of that purple stuff?”
  • In a discussion about drug trends, someone might mention, “Purple stuff is gaining popularity among certain communities.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I’ve tried purple stuff a few times and it definitely has a strong sedative effect.”

41. Dirty Sprite

Dirty Sprite, also known as “lean” or “purple drank,” is a recreational drug that combines prescription-strength cough syrup containing codeine and promethazine with a carbonated soft drink and sometimes a hard candy. The mixture is typically purple in color and produces a sedative and euphoric effect when consumed.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m sippin’ on some dirty sprite to relax.”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, one might warn, “The consumption of dirty sprite can have serious health consequences.”
  • A rapper might reference dirty sprite in their lyrics, such as “Sippin’ on that purple drank, I’m feeling so fly.”

42. Vic

Vic is a slang term for Vicodin, which is a prescription pain medication that contains a combination of hydrocodone and acetaminophen. It is used to relieve moderate to severe pain and can produce feelings of euphoria and relaxation when abused.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to pick up my Vic prescription from the pharmacy.”
  • In a discussion about opioid addiction, one might discuss the dangers of Vicodin abuse, stating, “Vic can be highly addictive and should only be used as prescribed.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any Vic left? I’m in pain and my prescription ran out.”

43. Snow

Snow is a slang term for heroin, which is a highly addictive opioid drug made from morphine. It typically appears as a white powder or brown sticky substance and can be snorted, smoked, or injected. The term “snow” is often used to refer to the white, powdery appearance of heroin.

  • For example, someone might say, “He got arrested for possession of snow.”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, one might explain, “Snow is a dangerous and illegal substance that can lead to severe addiction and overdose.”
  • A person might warn others by saying, “Stay away from snow, it will ruin your life.”

44. Demmies

Demmies is a slang term for Demerol, which is a brand name for the prescription medication meperidine. It is a powerful opioid painkiller that is used to treat moderate to severe pain. Demmies can produce a euphoric and sedative effect when abused.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to take my demmies for my chronic pain.”
  • In a discussion about opioid addiction, one might discuss the risks of demmies abuse, stating, “Demerol can be highly addictive and should only be used under medical supervision.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you know where I can get some demmies? I’m in a lot of pain.”

45. M30s

M30s is a street name for Oxycodone, which is a prescription opioid pain medication. M30s refer to the 30mg dosage of Oxycodone, which is a high strength. It is often abused for its euphoric effects and can lead to addiction and overdose.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s selling M30s on the street.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid crisis, one might discuss the prevalence of M30 abuse, stating, “M30s are a dangerous and addictive drug that is contributing to the epidemic.”
  • A person might ask, “Where can I find some M30s? I need something strong for my pain.”

46. Blueberries

“Blueberries” is a slang term for oxycodone pills, which are a type of opioid pain medication. The term is derived from the blue color of many oxycodone pills.

  • For example, a person might say, “I need to pick up some blueberries to help with my back pain.”
  • In a discussion about prescription drug abuse, someone might mention, “Blueberries are commonly abused because of their powerful pain-relieving effects.”
  • A news article might report, “Police seized a large quantity of blueberries during a drug bust.”

47. Tootsie rolls

“Tootsie rolls” is a slang term for heroin, a highly addictive opioid drug derived from morphine. The term is used to refer to the brown color and sticky consistency of heroin, which can resemble a Tootsie Roll candy.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He was caught with a bag of tootsie rolls in his pocket.”
  • In a conversation about the dangers of drug addiction, someone might mention, “Tootsie rolls are a potent and dangerous form of heroin.”
  • A news headline might read, “Police seize large quantity of tootsie rolls in drug raid.”

48. Brown sugar

“Brown sugar” is a slang term for heroin, a powerful and illegal opioid drug. The term is used to describe the brown color and powdery texture of heroin, which can resemble brown sugar.

  • For example, a person might say, “I heard he’s hooked on brown sugar.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid epidemic, someone might mention, “Brown sugar is a highly addictive and dangerous drug.”
  • A documentary about drug addiction might feature interviews with individuals who have struggled with brown sugar addiction.
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49. Skag

“Skag” is a slang term for heroin, a highly addictive opioid drug. The term is often used in urban settings to refer to heroin, particularly in the context of drug addiction and abuse.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s been using skag for years.”
  • In a conversation about the impact of drugs on communities, someone might mention, “Skag is destroying lives and tearing families apart.”
  • A news report might state, “Police arrested several individuals involved in the skag trade.”

50. Smackie

“Smackie” is a slang term for heroin, a potent and illegal opioid drug. The term is often used to refer to heroin in urban settings, particularly in the context of drug addiction and abuse.

  • For example, a person might say, “He’s a smackie, always chasing his next hit.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of drug use, someone might mention, “Smackie is a highly addictive and destructive drug.”
  • A news article might report, “Authorities are cracking down on the distribution of smackie in the city.”

51. Skittles

Skittles is a slang term used to refer to prescription pills, particularly those that are abused or taken recreationally. The term is derived from the colorful appearance of Skittles candy, which resembles the various types of pills.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found a bag of Skittles in my brother’s room, but they weren’t candy.”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, one might mention, “Skittles are a common form of opioid abuse among young people.”
  • A news article might warn, “Parents should be aware of the dangers of Skittles and educate their children about the risks of prescription pill abuse.”

52. Dance fever

Dance fever is a slang term used to refer to heroin, a highly addictive opioid drug. The term suggests that using heroin can induce a state of euphoria and increased energy, leading to a desire to dance or move.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s been struggling with dance fever for years.”
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, one might mention, “Dance fever is a dangerous and deadly drug.”
  • A news report might state, “The rise in dance fever use has led to an increase in overdoses and deaths.”

53. Murder 8

Murder 8 is a slang term used to refer to OxyContin, a powerful prescription opioid medication. The term is derived from the pill’s imprint, which often includes the number 80, resembling the word “eight.” The term “murder” is used to emphasize the drug’s potency and potential for addiction and overdose.

  • For example, someone might say, “I scored some murder 8 for a party tonight.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid epidemic, one might mention, “Murder 8 is one of the most abused prescription drugs.”
  • A news article might warn, “The misuse of murder 8 can have deadly consequences and lead to addiction.”