Top 20 Slang For 5 Dollar Bill – Meaning & Usage

The five dollar bill, a common denomination in the United States, has its own set of slang terms that may leave you scratching your head. But fear not, as we’ve got you covered! Our team has delved into the world of colloquialisms and come up with a list of the top slang for the five dollar bill. From quirky nicknames to cultural references, this listicle will not only keep you in the loop but also give you some conversation starters for your next trip to the store. So, grab your Lincolns and get ready to explore the colorful language surrounding the five dollar bill!

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1. Abe Lincoln

This term refers to the portrait of Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States, that is featured on the front of the 5 dollar bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I only have an Abe Lincoln left in my wallet.”
  • In a conversation about currency, one might ask, “Do you have any Abe Lincolns on you?”
  • A person might mention, “I found an Abe Lincoln on the ground and picked it up.”

2. Fiver

This slang term is used to refer to the 5 dollar bill, emphasizing its value as a five-unit denomination.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Can you lend me a fiver until payday?”
  • In a discussion about money, a person might ask, “How many fivers do you have in your wallet?”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll pay you back that fiver I owe you.”

3. Five-spot

This slang term is used to refer to the 5 dollar bill, highlighting the spot or place it holds in the hierarchy of currency denominations.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found a five-spot in my pocket.”
  • In a conversation about cash, a person might ask, “Can you break a five-spot for me?”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll give you a five-spot for that sandwich.”

4. Fin

This slang term is a shortened form of the word “fin,” referring to the 5 dollar bill.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just earned a fin for mowing the lawn.”
  • In a discussion about money, a person might ask, “Can you lend me a fin until tomorrow?”
  • A friend might say, “I owe you a fin for covering my lunch.”

5. Lincoln

This slang term is used to refer to the 5 dollar bill, specifically referencing the portrait of Abraham Lincoln on the front.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to break this Lincoln into smaller bills.”
  • In a conversation about currency, a person might ask, “Do you have any Lincolns on you?”
  • A friend might say, “I found a Lincoln in the parking lot.”

6. Five bones

This slang term refers to a five-dollar bill. It is derived from the idea that the bill is made of paper, similar to bones.

  • For example, someone might say, “I only have a few five bones left in my wallet.”
  • In a conversation about money, a person might mention, “I need to break a five bone to pay for my coffee.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Do you have any five bones to make change?”

7. Five smackers

This slang term is used to refer to a five-dollar bill. The term “smackers” is a playful way to refer to money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I found a five smacker on the ground!”
  • In a discussion about finances, a person might mention, “I’m short on cash, but I do have a few five smackers.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me a five smacker until payday?”

8. Five greenbacks

This slang term is used to refer to a five-dollar bill. It originated from the color of the bill, which is predominantly green.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to break a five greenback to pay for this snack.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might mention, “I found a few five greenbacks in my jacket pocket.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Do you have any five greenbacks to pay for your purchase?”

9. Five singles

This slang term refers to a five-dollar bill. It is derived from the fact that the bill is a single unit of currency.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to break a five single to pay for parking.”
  • In a discussion about money, a person might mention, “I only have a few five singles in my wallet.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me a five single until I get paid?”

10. Five bucks

This slang term is used to refer to a five-dollar bill. “Bucks” is a common slang term for money in general.

  • For example, someone might say, “I owe you five bucks for lunch.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might mention, “I found a few five bucks in my coat pocket.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Do you have any five bucks to pay for your purchase?”

11. Abe

This term refers to the image of Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States, that appears on the front of the five-dollar bill. It is a way to refer to the bill without explicitly saying “five-dollar bill”.

  • For example, “I only have an Abe in my wallet.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might say, “I need to save up a few more Abes for that concert.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break an Abe? I need change for the bus.”

12. Five clams

This term is derived from the slang term “clam” which is used to refer to a dollar. “Five clams” specifically refers to a five-dollar bill.

  • For instance, “I owe you five clams for lunch.”
  • In a discussion about expenses, someone might say, “I spent twenty clams on groceries, but all I have left is a five.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me a few clams? I need to buy a coffee.”

13. Five grand

While “grand” typically refers to one thousand dollars, in this context it is used to refer to a five-dollar bill. It is a way to emphasize the value of the bill.

  • For example, “I found a five grand in my jacket pocket.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I need to save up five grand for a vacation.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break a five grand? I need change for parking.”

14. Five potatoes

This term is derived from the rhyming slang for “five” and is used to refer to a five-dollar bill. “Potatoes” rhymes with “fives”.

  • For instance, “I only have five potatoes on me.”
  • In a discussion about money, someone might say, “I need to withdraw some potatoes from the bank.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any potatoes? I need change for the vending machine.”

15. Five-dollar note

This is the official term used to describe a five-dollar bill. It is a more formal way to refer to the bill.

  • For example, “I need to exchange my five-dollar note for smaller bills.”
  • In a conversation about currency, someone might say, “The five-dollar note features a portrait of Abraham Lincoln.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any five-dollar notes? I need change for the bus.”

16. Five dollar bill

This is a slang term for a five dollar bill, often used in casual conversation or when referring to money in a playful way.

  • For example, “Can you lend me a fiver? I forgot my wallet.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might say, “I’m trying to save up fivers for my vacation.”
  • A person might boast, “I found a fiver on the street today!”

17. Five-dollar banknote

This slang term refers to the five dollar banknote, which features a portrait of Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ve got a few Lincolns in my wallet.”
  • In a discussion about currency, someone might ask, “Do you have any spare Lincolns?”
  • A person might comment, “I always keep a Lincoln in my pocket for emergencies.”

18. Five ones

This term refers to a five dollar bill by breaking it down into five individual one dollar bills. It is often used when splitting a larger bill or when referring to a specific amount of money.

  • For example, “I’ll give you a five ones for that item.”
  • In a discussion about splitting a bill, someone might say, “Let’s each pay five ones.”
  • A person might comment, “I only have five singles, so I can’t give you change.”

19. Five big ones

This slang term refers to a five dollar bill, using the word “bucks” as a casual way to refer to money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll give you five big ones for that item.”
  • In a discussion about the cost of something, someone might ask, “How much did that cost? Five big ones?”
  • A person might comment, “I saved up five big ones to buy this.”

20. Five skins

This is a slang term for a five dollar bill, often used in informal conversation or when referring to money in a lighthearted way.

  • For example, “I found five skins in my pocket.”
  • In a discussion about money, someone might ask, “Do you have any spare five skins?”
  • A person might comment, “I need to get some change for these five skins.”
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