Top 86 Slang For French Canadian – Meaning & Usage

French Canadian, with its unique blend of French and English, has its own vibrant slang that adds flavor to the language. From colorful expressions to playful phrases, we’ve got you covered with the top slang words and phrases used by French Canadians. Get ready to expand your linguistic horizons and impress your friends with this fun and informative listicle. So, whether you’re planning a trip to Quebec or just want to sound like a true Canadian, this is the perfect guide to get you started on your journey to speaking like a local.

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1. Attache ta tuque!

This phrase is used to express excitement or anticipation. It is often used when something thrilling or unexpected is about to happen.

  • For example, if someone is about to perform a daring stunt, a friend might say, “Attache ta tuque!”
  • In a sports game, a fan might shout, “Attache ta tuque, it’s going to be a close match!”
  • When a surprise announcement is made, someone might exclaim, “Attache ta tuque, this is going to blow your mind!”

2. Fais-le au plus sacrant!

This phrase is used to urge someone to do something quickly or without hesitation. It conveys a sense of urgency or impatience.

  • For instance, if someone is taking too long to make a decision, someone might say, “Fais-le au plus sacrant!”
  • When someone is procrastinating, a friend might say, “Stop wasting time and fais-le au plus sacrant!”
  • In a time-sensitive situation, someone might instruct, “We need to finish this task, fais-le au plus sacrant!”

3. C’est le fun!

This phrase is used to express enjoyment or excitement about something. It conveys a sense of fun and pleasure.

  • For example, if someone suggests going to an amusement park, someone might respond, “C’est le fun!”
  • When attending a party, someone might comment, “C’est le fun, there’s great music and good company!”
  • When describing a fun activity, someone might say, “We went skiing last weekend, c’était le fun!”

4. Jaser

This verb is used to describe the act of chatting or having a conversation. It can refer to casual or friendly conversations.

  • For instance, if someone is talking to a friend on the phone, they might say, “Je jase avec mon ami.”
  • When catching up with someone, a person might say, “On devrait se jaser autour d’un café.”
  • In a social gathering, someone might suggest, “Asseyons-nous et jasons un peu!”

5. Mets-en

This phrase is used to express agreement or affirmation. It is similar to saying “definitely” or “for sure” in English.

  • For example, if someone asks if you want to go to a concert, you might respond, “Mets-en!”
  • When someone suggests a plan that you find exciting, you might say, “Mets-en, ça va être génial!”
  • In a conversation where someone makes a statement you strongly agree with, you might exclaim, “Mets-en, je suis complètement d’accord!”

6. Franchement?

Franchement? is a French Canadian slang term that is used to express surprise, disbelief, or incredulity. It is similar to saying “Seriously?” in English.

  • For example, if someone tells you an unbelievable story, you might respond with, “Franchement? I can’t believe that!”
  • In a conversation where someone is exaggerating, you might interject with, “Franchement? That’s a bit of a stretch.”
  • If someone shares a surprising fact, you might react with, “Franchement? I had no idea!”

7. Le chum… La blonde

In French Canadian slang, “le chum” is a term used to refer to a boyfriend, while “la blonde” is used to refer to a girlfriend. These terms are commonly used in casual conversations.

  • For instance, if someone asks about your significant other, you might respond with, “Mon chum” (my boyfriend) or “Ma blonde” (my girlfriend).
  • In a group of friends, someone might say, “J’ai un nouveau chum” (I have a new boyfriend) or “Ma blonde est venue me voir hier” (My girlfriend came to see me yesterday).
  • When discussing relationships, someone might ask, “Comment va ton chum?” (How is your boyfriend?) or “Tu es toujours avec ta blonde?” (Are you still with your girlfriend?)

8. Chanter la pomme

“Chanter la pomme” is a French Canadian slang phrase that means to flatter or compliment someone excessively. It is often used in a playful or joking manner.

  • For example, if someone is being overly complimentary, you might say, “Arrête de chanter la pomme!” (Stop flattering).
  • In a conversation about someone who is trying to win favor, you might comment, “Il essaie toujours de chanter la pomme pour obtenir ce qu’il veut” (He always tries to flatter to get what he wants).
  • When teasing a friend who is being overly nice, you might say, “T’as vraiment envie de me chanter la pomme aujourd’hui!” (You really want to flatter me today!)

9. Domper quelqu’un

In French Canadian slang, “domper quelqu’un” is a phrase used to refer to breaking up with someone or ending a romantic relationship. It is similar to saying “to dump someone” in English.

  • For instance, if someone asks about your ex-partner, you might say, “Je l’ai dompé il y a quelques mois” (I dumped him a few months ago).
  • In a conversation about relationship troubles, someone might say, “J’ai décidé de le domper parce qu’il ne me traitait pas bien” (I decided to dump him because he wasn’t treating me well).
  • When giving advice to a friend who is considering ending a relationship, you might say, “Si tu n’es pas heureux, tu devrais le domper” (If you’re not happy, you should dump him).

10. La bobette

In French Canadian slang, “la bobette” is a term used to refer to underwear, specifically women’s underwear. It is a colloquial and playful term.

  • For example, if someone asks about your laundry, you might say, “Je dois laver mes bobettes” (I need to wash my underwear).
  • In a conversation about shopping, someone might comment, “J’ai acheté de nouvelles bobettes hier” (I bought new underwear yesterday).
  • When discussing clothing preferences, someone might say, “Je préfère les bobettes en coton” (I prefer cotton underwear).

11. T’es ben chix

This phrase is used to compliment someone and acknowledge their coolness or awesomeness. It can be used to express admiration or approval.

  • For example, if someone shows off their new car, you might say, “T’es ben chix avec ta nouvelle voiture!”
  • In a conversation about a talented musician, you could say, “Il joue de la guitare comme un dieu. T’es ben chix!”
  • When a friend accomplishes something impressive, you might say, “T’es ben chix d’avoir terminé ce projet à temps!”

12. Partir sur une balloune

This phrase is used to describe going on a wild and indulgent spree, often involving excessive drinking or partying. It implies a state of uninhibited fun and letting loose.

  • For instance, if someone plans a weekend getaway with their friends, they might say, “On va partir sur une balloune et profiter de la vie!”
  • In a discussion about memorable nights out, someone might say, “La dernière fois que je suis parti sur une balloune, j’ai fini dans une fontaine!”
  • When reminiscing about a crazy party, you could say, “C’était une soirée légendaire où tout le monde est parti sur une balloune!”

13. Virer une brosse

This phrase is used to describe getting extremely drunk or intoxicated. It implies a loss of control and often leads to wild or unpredictable behavior.

  • For example, if someone asks how your night was, you might respond, “J’ai viré une brosse hier soir!”
  • In a conversation about a friend’s party, you could say, “Tout le monde a viré une brosse et ça a fini en chaos!”
  • When warning someone about the dangers of excessive drinking, you might say, “Attention à ne pas virer une brosse et regretter tes actions!”

14. Être paqueté… Être saoul

This phrase is used to describe being heavily intoxicated or drunk. It emphasizes a state of being completely under the influence of alcohol and often implies a loss of control.

  • For instance, if someone asks how you’re feeling after a night of partying, you might say, “J’étais complètement paqueté hier soir!”
  • In a discussion about memorable nights out, someone might say, “La dernière fois que j’étais saoul, j’ai dansé sur une table!”
  • When describing a friend’s behavior at a party, you could say, “Il était tellement paqueté qu’il a embrassé un inconnu!”

15. Avoir mal aux cheveux

This phrase is used to describe the physical discomfort and pain experienced after excessive drinking. It specifically refers to the headache that often accompanies a hangover.

  • For example, if someone asks how you’re feeling the morning after a party, you might say, “J’ai mal aux cheveux!”
  • In a conversation about the consequences of drinking too much, someone might say, “Le pire de la gueule de bois, c’est d’avoir mal aux cheveux.”
  • When giving advice on how to prevent a hangover, you could say, “Bois de l’eau entre chaque verre pour éviter d’avoir mal aux cheveux!”

16. Être sous raide

This phrase translates to “to be high” in English. It is commonly used to describe someone who is under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

  • For example, “Il est sous raide après avoir fumé de l’herbe” (He is high after smoking weed).
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “Je suis sous raide après avoir pris quelques verres” (I am high after having a few drinks).

17. Calice de Crisse!

This phrase is an exclamation of surprise or frustration. It is considered a vulgar expression and is often used to express strong emotions.

  • For instance, if someone drops something and it breaks, they might exclaim, “Calice de Crisse!”
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “Arrête de me parler, calice de crisse!” (Stop talking to me, holy shit!).
  • A person might use this phrase to express excitement, saying, “Calice de crisse, c’est incroyable!” (Holy shit, that’s amazing!)

18. Tabarnak!

This word is a strong expletive and is considered highly vulgar. It is often used to express anger, frustration, or surprise.

  • For example, if someone stubs their toe, they might yell, “Tabarnak!”
  • In a moment of extreme frustration, someone might say, “Tabarnak, je ne peux pas croire que cela m’arrive!” (Fuck, I can’t believe this is happening!).
  • A person might use this word to express disbelief, saying, “Tabarnak, c’est fou!” (Fuck, that’s crazy!)

19. Osti!

This word is a vulgar expression and is often used to express frustration, anger, or surprise.

  • For instance, if someone accidentally spills their coffee, they might say, “Osti!”
  • In a moment of anger, someone might say, “Va te faire foutre, osti!” (Go fuck yourself, shit!).
  • A person might use this word to express surprise, saying, “Osti, je ne m’attendais pas à cela!” (Shit, I wasn’t expecting that!)

20. Un ostie d’innocent

This phrase is a derogatory term used to insult someone by calling them a “fucking idiot” in English.

  • For example, if someone does something foolish, they might be referred to as “un ostie d’innocent.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “T’es vraiment un ostie d’innocent!” (You’re really a fucking idiot!).
  • A person might use this phrase to express frustration, saying, “Cet ostie d’innocent ne comprend rien!” (This fucking idiot doesn’t understand anything!).

21. Être niaiseux… Être poche

Être niaiseux means to be silly or foolish, while être poche means to be lousy or disappointing. These expressions are commonly used in Quebec French.

  • For example, “Arrête d’être niaiseux, concentre-toi!” (Stop being silly, concentrate!)
  • On the other hand, someone might say, “Ce film est vraiment poche, je suis déçu.” (This movie is really lousy, I’m disappointed.)
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22. Ferme ta gueule!

This phrase is a strong and vulgar way of telling someone to be quiet or to shut up. It is considered offensive and should be used with caution.

  • For instance, if someone is being loud and annoying, you might say, “Ferme ta gueule!” (Shut up!)
  • In a heated argument, one person might yell, “Je t’ai dit de fermer ta gueule!” (I told you to shut up!)
  • It’s important to note that this phrase is not appropriate for formal or polite situations.

23. J’ai mon voyage

J’ai mon voyage is an expression used to indicate that someone has had enough of something or is fed up with a situation.

  • For example, if someone is constantly bothering you, you might say, “J’ai mon voyage de cette personne.” (I’ve had enough of this person.)
  • In a frustrating situation, you could exclaim, “J’ai mon voyage de cette situation, je veux que ça change!” (I’ve had enough of this situation, I want it to change!)

24. Je m’en sacre

Je m’en sacre is a colloquial expression used to say that someone doesn’t care about something or is indifferent to it.

  • For instance, if someone is trying to convince you to do something you don’t want to do, you might say, “Je m’en sacre, je ne veux pas le faire.” (I don’t care, I don’t want to do it.)
  • In a discussion about a trivial matter, someone might say, “Je m’en sacre, ça n’a pas d’importance.” (I don’t care, it doesn’t matter.)

25. Tu me gosses

Tu me gosses is an expression used to tell someone that they are annoying or bothering you.

  • For example, if someone keeps interrupting you, you might say, “Arrête de me gosser, je suis occupé.” (Stop annoying me, I’m busy.)
  • In a frustrating situation, you could exclaim, “Tu me gosses avec tes questions incessantes!” (You annoy me with your constant questions!)

26. Avoir le feu au cul

This phrase translates to “having fire in one’s ass” and is used to describe someone who is in a rush or in a hurry.

  • For example, “Je dois partir maintenant, j’ai le feu au cul!” (I have to leave now, I’m in a hurry!)
  • In a conversation about being late, someone might say, “Il est toujours en retard, il a toujours le feu au cul!” (He’s always late, he’s always in a hurry!)
  • A person describing a busy day might say, “J’ai couru partout aujourd’hui, j’avais le feu au cul!” (I ran everywhere today, I was in a hurry!)

27. Crever de faim

This expression translates to “dying of hunger” and is used to describe someone who is extremely hungry.

  • For instance, “Je n’ai pas mangé depuis des heures, je crève de faim!” (I haven’t eaten in hours, I’m starving!)
  • In a discussion about food, someone might say, “J’ai sauté le déjeuner ce matin et maintenant je crève de faim!” (I skipped breakfast this morning and now I’m starving!)
  • A person expressing their hunger might say, “Je pourrais manger un éléphant, je crève de faim!” (I could eat an elephant, I’m starving!)

28. Avoir l’estomac dans les talons

This phrase translates to “having the stomach in the heels” and is used to describe someone who is very hungry.

  • For example, “Je n’ai pas mangé de la journée, j’ai l’estomac dans les talons!” (I haven’t eaten all day, I’m very hungry!)
  • In a conversation about food cravings, someone might say, “J’ai envie de tout manger, j’ai l’estomac dans les talons!” (I feel like eating everything, I’m very hungry!)
  • A person expressing their extreme hunger might say, “Je pourrais manger un cheval, j’ai l’estomac dans les talons!” (I could eat a horse, I’m very hungry!)

29. Cogner des clous

This expression translates to “hitting nails” and is used to describe someone who is falling asleep or nodding off.

  • For instance, “Je n’ai pas dormi de la nuit, je cogne des clous!” (I didn’t sleep all night, I’m falling asleep!)
  • In a conversation about being tired, someone might say, “Je n’arrête pas de bâiller, je cogne des clous!” (I can’t stop yawning, I’m falling asleep!)
  • A person describing their drowsiness might say, “Je suis tellement fatigué que je cogne des clous partout!” (I’m so tired that I’m falling asleep everywhere!)

30. Se pogner le cul

This phrase translates to “grabbing one’s ass” and is used to describe someone who is being lazy or not doing anything productive.

  • For example, “Arrête de te pogner le cul et mets-toi au travail!” (Stop being lazy and get to work!)
  • In a conversation about procrastination, someone might say, “Je me pogne le cul au lieu de faire mes devoirs.” (I’m being lazy instead of doing my homework.)
  • A person criticizing someone’s lack of effort might say, “Il se pogne le cul toute la journée et ne fait rien.” (He’s being lazy all day and not doing anything.)

31. Toaster des deux bords

This slang phrase means to try to please everyone or to be indecisive. It refers to someone who is trying to stay on good terms with different groups or individuals, often by saying what they want to hear.

  • For example, “He’s always trying to toaster des deux bords and avoid conflict.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “Politicians often toaster des deux bords to appeal to different voter groups.”
  • A person describing a friend’s behavior might say, “She’s always trying to please everyone and ends up toaster des deux bords.”

32. Lache pas la patate

This phrase is a motivational slang expression that encourages someone to persevere or keep going, even in difficult situations. It literally translates to “don’t let go of the potato,” but figuratively means to not give up or lose hope.

  • For instance, a coach might say to their team, “Lache pas la patate, we can still win this!”
  • In a conversation about personal challenges, someone might say, “I’ve had a tough week, but I’m lache pas la patate.”
  • A friend might encourage another by saying, “You’ve got this! Lache pas la patate!”

33. Avoir des vers dans le cul

This slang phrase translates to “to have worms in one’s ass” and is used to describe someone who is restless, unable to sit still, or constantly moving around. It implies a sense of discomfort or impatience.

  • For example, “He’s always fidgeting and can’t stay in one place. Il doit avoir des vers dans le cul.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s energy level, a person might say, “She’s always on the go. Elle a sûrement des vers dans le cul.”
  • A friend teasingly commenting on someone’s restlessness might say, “Can’t you sit still for a minute? Tu as vraiment des vers dans le cul!”

34. C’est de valeur!

This phrase is used to express approval or satisfaction with something. It can be used to describe something that is enjoyable, valuable, or worth the effort.

  • For instance, after trying a delicious dessert, someone might exclaim, “C’est de valeur!”
  • In a conversation about a challenging project, someone might say, “It’s a lot of work, but the end result will be c’est de valeur.”
  • A person describing their favorite hobby might say, “I spend hours on it, but the satisfaction I get is c’est de valeur!”

35. Il fait frette

This phrase is used to describe cold weather. “Il fait” translates to “it is,” and “frette” is a slang term for cold.

  • For example, someone might say, “Il fait frette aujourd’hui, n’oublie pas ton manteau!”
  • In a conversation about winter temperatures, a person might comment, “Il fait vraiment frette cette année.”
  • A friend might complain about the cold weather by saying, “Je n’aime pas quand il fait frette, je préfère l’été.”

36. J’ai la langue à terre

This phrase translates to “I have my tongue on the ground” and is used to express extreme exhaustion or fatigue.

  • For example, after a long day of work, someone might say, “J’ai la langue à terre, je suis épuisé(e).” (I’m exhausted, I have my tongue on the ground)
  • If someone is feeling overwhelmed by a busy schedule, they might say, “J’ai tellement de choses à faire, j’ai la langue à terre.” (I have so much to do, I have my tongue on the ground)

37. Être vite sur ses patins

This phrase is used to describe someone who is quick or agile in their movements.

  • For instance, if someone is known for their quick reflexes, you might say, “Il est vite sur ses patins.” (He is quick on his skates)
  • In a sports context, you might say, “Les joueurs de hockey doivent être vite sur leurs patins pour éviter les adversaires.” (Hockey players need to be quick on their skates to avoid opponents)
  • If someone is able to react quickly in a difficult situation, you might say, “Elle est toujours vite sur ses patins, peu importe la situation.” (She is always quick on her skates, no matter the situation)

38. Avoir les shakes

This phrase is used to describe someone who is experiencing trembling or shaking, often as a result of nervousness or anxiety.

  • For example, if someone is feeling nervous before a big presentation, they might say, “J’ai les shakes.” (I have the shakes)
  • In a medical context, this phrase can also refer to someone experiencing tremors due to a health condition.
  • If someone is visibly shaking due to fear or stress, you might say, “Il a les shakes, il est vraiment stressé.” (He has the shakes, he is really stressed)

39. Québécois

This term refers to someone who is from the Canadian province of Quebec. It is used to describe the people, culture, and language of Quebec.

  • For instance, if someone asks where you are from, you might say, “Je suis Québécois(e).” (I am Québécois)
  • In a discussion about Canadian identity, you might say, “Les Québécois ont une culture distincte.” (Québécois people have a distinct culture)
  • If someone is speaking French with a Quebec accent, you might say, “Il parle français avec un accent québécois.” (He speaks French with a Québécois accent)

40. Tabarnak

This word is a strong exclamation used to express strong emotions such as frustration, anger, or surprise. It is considered a vulgar term in French Canadian slang.

  • For example, if someone accidentally drops something and gets hurt, they might exclaim, “Tabarnak!”
  • In a heated argument, someone might use this word to express their anger or frustration.
  • If someone is shocked by a surprising news, they might say, “Tabarnak, je n’aurais jamais cru ça!” (Tabarnak, I would have never believed that!)

41. Sacrebleu

This is a French Canadian expression used to express surprise or frustration. It is similar to the English expression “oh my god” or “oh my goodness”.

  • For example, if someone accidentally spills their coffee, they might exclaim, “Sacrebleu!”
  • In a moment of frustration, someone might say, “Sacrebleu, I can’t believe I forgot my keys again.”
  • When someone receives unexpected news, they might react with, “Sacrebleu, I never saw that coming!”

42. Poutine

Poutine is a popular French Canadian dish made of french fries topped with cheese curds and smothered in gravy. It is a comfort food that is often enjoyed as a late-night snack or a meal on its own.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m craving some poutine, let’s go to the nearest diner.”
  • In a discussion about Canadian cuisine, someone might mention, “Poutine is a must-try dish when visiting Quebec.”
  • A food enthusiast might describe their experience with poutine, saying, “The combination of crispy fries, melty cheese curds, and savory gravy in poutine is simply divine.”

43. Toune

Toune is a slang term used in French Canadian to refer to a song or a track of music. It is derived from the French word “chanson”, which means song.

  • For example, a person might ask, “Can you play my favorite toune?”
  • In a conversation about music, someone might recommend, “You should listen to this new toune, it’s really catchy.”
  • A music lover might say, “I can’t stop singing along to that toune, it’s stuck in my head.”

44. Tuque

A tuque is a type of knitted hat commonly worn in cold weather to keep the head warm. It is a staple accessory in French Canadian culture.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to find my tuque before going outside, it’s freezing.”
  • In a discussion about winter fashion, someone might mention, “A cozy tuque is a must-have accessory.”
  • A person might compliment someone’s outfit by saying, “I love your tuque, it adds a stylish touch to your look.”

45. Chum

Chum is a slang term used in French Canadian to refer to a friend or a boyfriend. It is similar to the English terms “buddy” or “mate”.

  • For example, someone might say, “Hey chum, want to grab a coffee?”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might ask, “How long have you been with your chum?”
  • A person might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my chum, we’ve known each other since childhood.”

46. Blonde

In French Canadian slang, “blonde” is used to refer to a woman. It is similar to the English slang term “chick” or “babe”.

  • For example, a guy might say to his friend, “Check out that hot blonde over there.”
  • In a conversation about dating, someone might ask, “Have you met any interesting blondes lately?”
  • A person might compliment their friend by saying, “You’re looking gorgeous, blonde!”

47. Câlisse

Câlisse is a strong swear word in French Canadian slang, equivalent to the English word “fuck”. It is often used to express frustration or anger.

  • For instance, if someone drops something and it breaks, they might exclaim, “Câlisse!”
  • In a heated argument, one person might say to another, “Va te faire câlisser!” (Go fuck yourself!)
  • A person might use the word in a humorous way, saying, “J’ai perdu mes clés, câlisse!” (I lost my keys, fuck!)
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48. Ostie

Ostie is another strong swear word in French Canadian slang, equivalent to the English word “damn” or “shit”. It is often used to express surprise or frustration.

  • For example, if someone spills a drink, they might say, “Ostie!”
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, someone might say, “C’est ben de l’ostie!” (This is some damn shit!)
  • A person might use the word to emphasize a point, saying, “J’ai vraiment besoin de vacances, ostie!” (I really need a vacation, damn!)

49. Char

In French Canadian slang, “char” is used to refer to a car. It is similar to the English slang term “ride” or “wheels”.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just got a new char, it’s a beauty!”
  • In a conversation about road trips, someone might ask, “Who’s driving? Do you have a char?”
  • A person might compliment their friend’s car by saying, “Nice char! It’s so shiny!”

50. Boucane

In French Canadian slang, “boucane” is used to refer to smoke, particularly from a fire or a cigarette. It is similar to the English slang term “smoke” or “fog”.

  • For example, someone might say, “Ça sent la boucane ici!” (It smells like smoke here!)
  • In a conversation about camping, someone might ask, “Did you bring any boucane for the campfire?”
  • A person might warn their friend, “Tu devrais arrêter de fumer, ça fait de la mauvaise boucane pour ta santé!” (You should quit smoking, it’s bad smoke for your health!)

51. Magasiner

Magasiner is a verb in French Canadian slang that means “to shop.” It is commonly used to refer to the act of going shopping or browsing in stores.

  • For example, “Je vais magasiner pour des vêtements ce weekend” (I’m going shopping for clothes this weekend).
  • In a conversation about buying groceries, someone might say, “Je vais magasiner au supermarché” (I’m going grocery shopping at the supermarket).
  • A person discussing their weekend plans might mention, “Je vais magasiner des cadeaux pour mon ami” (I’m going shopping for gifts for my friend).

52. Dépanneur

Dépanneur is a noun in French Canadian slang that refers to a convenience store. It is commonly used to describe small, local stores that sell a variety of items, including snacks, drinks, and basic household goods.

  • For instance, “Je vais au dépanneur pour acheter des chips” (I’m going to the convenience store to buy some chips).
  • In a discussion about late-night cravings, someone might say, “J’ai acheté une glace au dépanneur” (I bought an ice cream at the convenience store).
  • A person asking for directions might inquire, “Est-ce qu’il y a un dépanneur près d’ici?” (Is there a convenience store nearby?)

53. Toaster

Toaster is a verb in French Canadian slang that means “to flirt.” It is commonly used to describe the act of showing romantic or sexual interest in someone.

  • For example, “Il m’a toasté toute la soirée” (He flirted with me all night).
  • In a conversation about dating, someone might say, “J’aime bien toaster les gens que je rencontre” (I enjoy flirting with people I meet).
  • A person discussing their friend’s flirting skills might comment, “Elle est vraiment bonne pour toaster les garçons” (She’s really good at flirting with boys).

54. Pitoune

Pitoune is a noun in French Canadian slang that is used to describe an attractive woman. It is a colloquial term often used in a casual or playful manner.

  • For instance, “Elle est une vraie pitoune” (She’s a real hottie).
  • In a discussion about physical attractiveness, someone might say, “Il aime sortir avec des pitounes” (He likes to date hot girls).
  • A person complimenting their friend’s appearance might say, “Tu es une belle pitoune” (You’re a beautiful babe).

55. Chiac

Chiac is a noun in French Canadian slang that refers to a mixed language combining French and English. It is commonly spoken in certain regions of Eastern Canada, particularly in Acadian communities.

  • For example, “Les jeunes parlent souvent en chiac entre eux” (Young people often speak in chiac with each other).
  • In a conversation about language diversity, someone might say, “Le chiac est un mélange intéressant de français et d’anglais” (Chiac is an interesting mix of French and English).
  • A person discussing their bilingualism might mention, “Je suis capable de parler en chiac avec mes amis acadiens” (I’m able to speak in chiac with my Acadian friends).

56. Tanné

This word is used to describe someone who is annoyed or fed up with something or someone. It can also be used to express frustration or exasperation.

  • For example, “Je suis tanné de cette situation” translates to “I’m tired of this situation.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult coworker, someone might say, “Il me tanné avec ses plaintes” meaning “He annoys me with his complaints.”
  • A person might exclaim, “Je suis tanné de cette pluie” which means “I’m fed up with this rain.”

57. Niaiseux

This word is used to describe someone or something that is silly, foolish, or not serious. It can also be used to express disbelief or surprise.

  • For instance, “Arrête d’être niaiseux!” translates to “Stop being silly!”
  • In a conversation about a funny video, someone might say, “C’est vraiment niaiseux” meaning “That’s really silly.”
  • A person might exclaim, “Je niaise pas, c’est vrai!” which means “I’m not kidding, it’s true!”

58. Crosseur

This word is used to describe someone who is dishonest or involved in fraudulent activities. It can also be used to refer to a person who takes advantage of others for personal gain.

  • For example, “Il est un crosseur professionnel” translates to “He is a professional scammer.”
  • In a conversation about a deceptive salesperson, someone might say, “Méfiez-vous de cet homme, c’est un crosseur” meaning “Beware of that man, he’s a scammer.”
  • A person might warn others by saying, “Ne lui faites pas confiance, c’est un crosseur” which means “Don’t trust him, he’s a scammer.”

59. Patente

This word is used as a placeholder or generic term when referring to an object or thing whose name is unknown or forgotten. It can also be used to express frustration or annoyance.

  • For instance, “Passe-moi la patente là-bas” translates to “Pass me that thingamajig over there.”
  • In a conversation about a malfunctioning device, someone might say, “J’ai essayé de réparer la patente, mais ça ne fonctionne toujours pas” meaning “I tried to fix the thingamajig, but it still doesn’t work.”
  • A person might exclaim, “Je ne comprends rien à cette patente!” which means “I don’t understand anything about this thingamajig!”

60. Chérie

This word is used as an affectionate term to address someone, typically a romantic partner. It can also be used to express fondness or endearment.

  • For example, “Bonjour, ma chérie” translates to “Hello, my darling.”
  • In a conversation about a loved one, someone might say, “Je t’aime, ma chérie” meaning “I love you, my darling.”
  • A person might express affection by saying, “Tu es si belle, ma chérie” which means “You are so beautiful, my darling.”

61. Tarte au sucre

A traditional French Canadian dessert made with a filling of brown sugar, eggs, and cream, baked in a pastry shell. It is a sweet and rich treat often enjoyed during special occasions or as a comfort food.

  • For example, “I can’t wait to have a slice of tarte au sucre after dinner.”
  • During the holidays, it is common to see tarte au sucre on dessert tables.
  • A person might say, “My grandmother’s tarte au sucre recipe is the best.”

62. Câline

A term used in Quebec French to express affection or endearment. It can mean “hug” or “cuddle” and is often used in a playful or loving manner.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Viens ici, ma câline!” (Come here, my cuddle!).
  • A parent might say to their child, “Viens me faire un câline” (Come give me a hug).
  • When comforting a loved one, someone might say, “Viens, je vais te faire un câline” (Come, I’ll give you a cuddle).

63. Cabane à sucre

A traditional Quebecois establishment where maple syrup is produced and served with various dishes, such as pancakes, ham, and baked beans. It is a popular destination during the sugaring-off season, typically in the spring, and offers a unique cultural and culinary experience.

  • For example, “Let’s go to the cabane à sucre this weekend and indulge in maple syrup treats.”
  • Families often visit the cabane à sucre to enjoy a traditional meal and learn about maple syrup production.
  • A person might say, “I love the festive atmosphere at the cabane à sucre during sugaring-off season.”

64. Bec

A slang term used in Quebec French to refer to a person’s mouth or face. It can also be used to describe someone who talks a lot or has a big mouth.

  • For instance, “Ferme ton bec!” (Shut your mouth!)
  • A person might say, “Elle a un bec bien dessiné” (She has a well-defined mouth).
  • When teasing a friend, someone might say, “T’as un bec de canard!” (You have a duck’s beak!)
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65. Bouette

A colloquial term used in Quebec French to refer to trash or garbage. It can also be used metaphorically to describe something of poor quality or a failure.

  • For example, “Jette ça à la bouette” (Throw it in the garbage).
  • A person might say, “Ce film-là, c’est de la bouette” (That movie is garbage).
  • When criticizing a product, someone might say, “C’est de la bouette, ça ne fonctionne même pas!” (It’s garbage, it doesn’t even work!).

66. Chialeux

This term is used to describe someone who complains a lot or is constantly whining. It is derived from the verb “chialer,” which means “to complain” in French Canadian slang.

  • For example, “Stop being such a chialeux and find a solution.”
  • In a discussion about difficult customers, someone might say, “Dealing with chialeux can be exhausting.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “You’re such a chialeux, always finding something to complain about.”

67. Bécik

This word is a slang term for a bicycle in French Canadian. It is derived from the English word “bike” and is commonly used in casual conversation.

  • For instance, “I’m going to ride my bécik to work today.”
  • In a discussion about outdoor activities, someone might ask, “Do you have a bécik? Let’s go for a ride.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer using my bécik for short trips instead of driving.”

68. Vire-capot

This term is used to describe someone who frequently changes their opinion or stance on a particular issue. It is derived from the verb “virer” which means “to turn” and “capot” which means “hood” in French Canadian slang.

  • For example, “He’s such a vire-capot, he can never make up his mind.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “Politicians often get labeled as vire-capot for changing their positions.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “You’re such a vire-capot, you can’t stick to one decision.”

69. Bouffon

This word is used to describe someone who is a clown or a joker. It can also be used in a derogatory manner to insult someone by calling them a fool or an idiot.

  • For instance, “He always makes everyone laugh, he’s such a bouffon.”
  • In a discussion about comedy, someone might say, “A good bouffon knows how to make people smile.”
  • A person might jokingly call their friend a bouffon after a silly mistake, saying, “You’re such a bouffon, how did you manage to trip over your own feet?”

70. Biner

This word is used to describe the act of throwing something away or getting rid of it. It is derived from the verb “biner” which means “to throw away” in French Canadian slang.

  • For example, “I’m going to biner this old shirt, it’s too worn out.”
  • In a discussion about decluttering, someone might say, “It’s time to biner all the unnecessary stuff.”
  • A person might ask their friend, “Can you biner this trash for me?”

71. Pogner

This term is used to describe the act of picking up or hooking up with someone, often in a romantic or sexual context. It is derived from the French word “pogner,” which means “to catch” or “to grab.”

  • For example, a person might say, “J’ai réussi à pogner une fille hier soir” (I managed to pick up a girl last night).
  • In a conversation about dating, someone might ask, “Comment tu fais pour pogner autant?” (How do you manage to pick up so many people?).
  • A friend might tease, “T’as de la misère à pogner, hein?” (You’re having trouble picking up, huh?).

72. Débarquer

This slang term is used to describe the act of showing up or arriving at a place. It can also be used to convey the idea of “to come” or “to come over.”

  • For instance, someone might say, “Je vais débarquer chez toi dans 5 minutes” (I’ll show up at your place in 5 minutes).
  • In a conversation about a party, a person might ask, “Est-ce que tu vas débarquer ce soir?” (Are you going to show up tonight?).
  • A friend might say, “Je vais débarquer chez toi demain pour t’aider avec ton déménagement” (I’ll come over to your place tomorrow to help you with your move).

73. Blé d’Inde

This term is used to refer to corn on the cob, a popular food item. It is derived from the French words “blé” (wheat) and “Inde” (India).

  • For example, someone might say, “On va faire un BBQ et manger du blé d’Inde” (We’re going to have a BBQ and eat corn on the cob).
  • In a conversation about favorite summer foods, a person might say, “J’adore manger du blé d’Inde grillé” (I love eating grilled corn on the cob).
  • A friend might suggest, “On devrait acheter du blé d’Inde pour le souper” (We should buy some corn on the cob for dinner).

74. Franglais

This term is used to describe a mix of French and English, often in conversation or writing. It is a combination of the words “français” (French) and “anglais” (English).

  • For instance, someone might say, “J’utilise beaucoup de franglais dans mes textos” (I use a lot of Franglais in my text messages).
  • In a discussion about language, a person might ask, “Est-ce que tu parles le franglais?” (Do you speak Franglais?).
  • A friend might comment, “Le franglais est une façon intéressante de mélanger les deux langues” (Franglais is an interesting way to mix the two languages).

75. Gosses

This term is used to refer to testicles, the male reproductive organs. It is a colloquial and slang term often used in informal conversations.

  • For example, someone might say, “Il a reçu un coup dans les gosses” (He got hit in the testicles).
  • In a conversation about male anatomy, a person might ask, “Est-ce que tu as mal aux gosses?” (Do your testicles hurt?).
  • A friend might joke, “Fais attention, tu risques de te faire cogner dans les gosses” (Be careful, you might get hit in the testicles).

76. Poches

This term is used to refer to someone who is cheap or stingy. It can also be used to describe something that is of low quality or not worth much.

  • For example, “He never wants to pay for anything, he’s such a poches.”
  • A person might say, “I bought this shirt for cheap, but it’s poches quality.”
  • Another might comment, “The food at that restaurant was poches, I wouldn’t recommend it.”

77. Tounes

This word is used to refer to songs or music. It is commonly used in the context of listening to or discussing music.

  • For instance, “I love listening to tounes from the 90s.”
  • A person might say, “Do you have any recommendations for French tounes?”
  • Another might comment, “That band’s new tounes are really catchy.”

78. Patente à gosse

This term is used to refer to an object or thing whose name is unknown or forgotten. It is a colloquial expression often used when the speaker can’t remember the specific name of something.

  • For example, “Can you pass me that patente à gosse over there?”
  • A person might say, “I need to fix this patente à gosse, but I’m not sure how.”
  • Another might ask, “Have you seen my patente à gosse? I can’t find it anywhere.”

79. Chumette

This word is used to refer to a girlfriend or female partner. It is a colloquial term often used in casual conversations.

  • For instance, “I’m going out with my chumette tonight.”
  • A person might say, “My chumette and I are planning a weekend getaway.”
  • Another might comment, “I’m looking for a new chumette, any recommendations?”

80. Chumail

This term is used to refer to a boyfriend or male partner. It is a colloquial term often used in casual conversations.

  • For example, “I’m going on a date with my chumail.”
  • A person might say, “My chumail surprised me with flowers.”
  • Another might comment, “I’m introducing my chumail to my parents this weekend.”

81. Sac à puce

This term is used to refer to a person who is unkempt or messy in appearance. It can also be used to describe a place that is dirty or disorganized.

  • For example, “Look at that guy’s messy hair and wrinkled clothes, he’s a real sac à puce.”
  • In a conversation about a dirty apartment, someone might say, “I went to visit my friend, and their place was a total sac à puce.”
  • Another example could be, “I need to clean my room, it looks like a sac à puce in here.”

82. Tête carrée

This term is used to describe someone who is rigid, inflexible, or stubborn. It can also refer to someone who is not very imaginative or creative.

  • For instance, “He never wants to try anything new, he’s such a tête carrée.”
  • In a discussion about someone who is resistant to change, one might say, “My boss is a real tête carrée when it comes to implementing new ideas.”
  • Another example could be, “I asked him to come up with a creative solution, but he’s just a tête carrée.”

83. Crinqué

This term is used to describe someone who is very excited or enthusiastic about something.

  • For example, “She was crinqué about going to the concert.”
  • In a conversation about a highly anticipated event, someone might say, “I’m so crinqué for the party tomorrow.”
  • Another example could be, “The team was crinqué before the big game.”

84. S’arracher

This term is used to describe someone leaving a place or situation in a hurry or hastily.

  • For instance, “He had to s’arracher from the meeting to catch his flight.”
  • In a discussion about someone abruptly leaving a party, one might say, “She just s’arrached without saying goodbye.”
  • Another example could be, “I need to s’arracher from work early today.”

85. Fourrer

This term is used to describe messing with or playing a prank on someone.

  • For example, “He likes to fourrer with his friends by hiding their belongings.”
  • In a conversation about someone playing a practical joke, someone might say, “He’s always fourring with people, it’s his way of having fun.”
  • Another example could be, “I’m going to fourrer with my sister by pretending to be a ghost.”

86. Capoter

This term is used to describe someone who is extremely angry or upset. It can also mean to go crazy or lose control of one’s emotions.

  • For example, “Il a complètement capoté quand il a découvert qu’il avait perdu son portefeuille” (He completely flipped out when he discovered he had lost his wallet).
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “Arrête de capoter, ça ne vaut pas la peine” (Stop flipping out, it’s not worth it).
  • If someone is acting irrational or irrational, you might say, “Il est en train de capoter, il faut le calmer” (He’s going crazy, we need to calm him down).