Top 50 Slang For $50 – Meaning & Usage

Are you looking to up your slang game without breaking the bank? Look no further! We’ve scoured the depths of the internet to bring you the top slang words and phrases for just $50. From trendy phrases to hidden gems, this list has got you covered. Get ready to impress your friends and keep up with the latest lingo, all for a bargain price. Don’t miss out on this budget-friendly opportunity to level up your language skills!

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1. Fifty bucks

This slang term is used to refer to a sum of $50 in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, “I’ll give you fifty bucks for that old record player.”
  • A person might say, “I spent fifty bucks on these new shoes.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you lend me fifty bucks until payday?”

2. Half a C-note

This slang term refers to $50, which is half the value of a one-hundred-dollar bill (also known as a “C-note”).

  • For instance, “I’ll pay you back with half a C-note.”
  • A person might say, “I only have half a C-note left in my wallet.”
  • Another might jokingly ask, “Can you spot me half a C-note for lunch?”

3. Two twenties and a ten

This slang term describes a combination of two twenty-dollar bills and one ten-dollar bill, which adds up to a total of $50.

  • For example, “I paid for the concert tickets with two twenties and a ten.”
  • A person might say, “I need to break a fifty, so I’ll give you two twenties and a ten.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you give me change for a fifty? I only have two twenties and a ten.”

4. Two fives and a forty

This slang term refers to a combination of two five-dollar bills and one forty-dollar bill, which adds up to a total of $50.

  • For instance, “I paid for dinner with two fives and a forty.”
  • A person might say, “I found two fives and a forty in my pocket, so I have enough for the movie.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you break a fifty? I only have two fives and a forty.”

5. A Grant

This slang term is derived from the portrait of Ulysses S. Grant, the 18th President of the United States, which appears on the fifty-dollar bill.

  • For example, “I’ll give you a Grant for that collectible comic book.”
  • A person might say, “I earned a Grant from my part-time job.”
  • Another might joke, “I wish I had a Grant to spend on a new video game.”

6. A 50-spot

This slang term refers to a fifty-dollar bill. It is often used in informal settings to casually refer to this specific denomination of currency.

  • For example, “I’ll pay you back with a 50-spot.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might say, “I found a 50-spot in my old jacket pocket.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break a 50-spot for me?”

7. A 50-piece

Similar to “A 50-spot,” this slang term also refers to a fifty-dollar bill. It is another casual way to mention this specific amount of money.

  • For instance, “I’m short on cash, can you lend me a 50-piece?”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might say, “I only have a few 50-pieces left.”
  • A person might comment, “I found a 50-piece on the street today!”

8. A half-yard

This slang term refers to the amount of fifty dollars. The term “half-yard” is derived from the fact that fifty dollars is half of a hundred-dollar bill, which is also called a “yard.”

  • For example, “I owe you a half-yard for the concert tickets.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might say, “I spent a half-yard on groceries this week.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me a half-yard until payday?”

9. A stack

Although this term is not specific to fifty dollars, it is sometimes used to refer to a stack of fifty-dollar bills, which would equal one thousand dollars. It is a slang term often used in informal contexts.

  • For instance, “I lost a stack at the casino last night.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might say, “I saved up a stack for vacation.”
  • A person might comment, “I found a stack of cash hidden in an old book!”

10. A fin

While “A fin” is not specifically related to fifty dollars, it is worth mentioning as it is a popular slang term for a five-dollar bill. It is often used in casual conversations.

  • For example, “Can you spot me a fin for lunch?”
  • In a discussion about money, someone might say, “I found a fin in my pocket.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have change for a fin?”

11. A double sawbuck

This slang term refers to a twenty-dollar bill. It is derived from the term “sawbuck,” which is slang for a ten-dollar bill. So, a “double sawbuck” is twice the value of a regular sawbuck.

  • For example, someone might say, “I paid a double sawbuck for that concert ticket.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might ask, “Do you have change for a double sawbuck?”
  • A person might complain, “I had to give the cashier a double sawbuck for a simple meal.”

12. A Jackson

This slang term is used to refer to a twenty-dollar bill. It originates from the image of Andrew Jackson, the seventh President of the United States, featured on the front of the bill.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need a Jackson to pay for this dinner.”
  • In a conversation about cash, a person might ask, “Can you break a Jackson?”
  • A person might boast, “I found a Jackson on the street today!”

13. A blue lobster

This slang term is used to refer to a fifty-dollar bill. It is derived from the rare occurrence of blue lobsters, which are extremely uncommon and thus valuable.

  • For example, someone might say, “I had to pay a blue lobster for that concert ticket.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might ask, “Do you have change for a blue lobster?”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t believe I spent a blue lobster on that meal.”

14. A 5-0

This slang term is used to refer to a fifty-dollar bill. It is derived from the police code “5-0” which is used to indicate the presence of law enforcement.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I had to shell out a 5-0 for that new video game.”
  • In a conversation about cash, a person might ask, “Can you break a 5-0?”
  • A person might brag, “I found a 5-0 on the ground today!”

15. A half-century

This slang term is used to refer to a fifty-dollar bill. It is derived from the fact that fifty dollars is equal to half of a hundred dollars, which is commonly referred to as a “century” in slang.

  • For example, someone might say, “I had to fork over a half-century for those concert tickets.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might ask, “Do you have change for a half-century?”
  • A person might grumble, “I can’t believe I spent a half-century on that meal.”

16. A five-oh

This slang term refers to a fifty-dollar bill. It is derived from the fact that the bill features the number “50” prominently on its face.

  • For example, “I just found a five-oh in my pocket!”
  • A person might say, “I need to withdraw some cash, can you give me a few five-ohs?”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I had to pay fifty bucks for that concert ticket, it was all five-ohs.”

17. A half-a-C

This slang term is a shorter way of saying “half a century,” which is a common term for fifty dollars.

  • For instance, “Can you lend me a half-a-C until payday?”
  • In a discussion about expenses, someone might say, “I spent a half-a-C on groceries this week.”
  • A person might ask, “How much does that shirt cost? About a half-a-C?”

18. A half-a-yard

This slang term is derived from the fact that a “yard” is a common term for one hundred dollars. Therefore, “half-a-yard” refers to fifty dollars.

  • For example, “I only have a half-a-yard left in my wallet.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might say, “I can lend you a half-a-yard if you need it.”
  • A person might mention, “I found a half-a-yard on the ground today, lucky me!”

19. Half a Benjamin

This slang term combines the name “Benjamin” (referring to Benjamin Franklin, whose portrait appears on the one hundred dollar bill) with the phrase “half a,” indicating a fifty-dollar bill.

  • For instance, “I’ll pay you back with half a Benjamin.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might say, “I need to save up half a Benjamin for that concert.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have change for a twenty? I need half a Benjamin.”

20. Two Jacksons

This slang term refers to the fact that there are two twenty-dollar bills in a standard U.S. currency denomination. Therefore, “two Jacksons” adds up to fifty dollars.

  • For example, “I’ll give you two Jacksons for that video game.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might ask, “Can you break a fifty? I have two Jacksons.”
  • A person might say, “I need to withdraw some cash, can you give me two Jacksons?”

21. A 50 spot

This is a slang term for a fifty-dollar bill, which is the currency denomination. It is often used in informal settings or among friends.

  • For instance, if someone owes you money, you might say, “Can you pay me back that 50 spot?”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might mention, “I found a 50 spot in my old jeans pocket.”
  • A person might joke, “I wish I had a 50 spot to spare right now.”

22. A 50-bill

Similar to “a 50 spot,” this is another slang term for a fifty-dollar bill. It is commonly used in casual conversations or among friends.

  • For example, if someone asks you for change, you might say, “Sorry, I only have a 50-bill.”
  • In a discussion about expenses, someone might mention, “I had to break a 50-bill to pay for groceries.”
  • A person might say, “I’m saving up all my 50-bills for a vacation.”

23. A 50-note

This is another slang term for a fifty-dollar bill. It is often used in informal or colloquial settings.

  • For instance, if someone asks you for money, you might say, “Sorry, I only have a 50-note.”
  • In a conversation about shopping, someone might mention, “I found a 50-note in my wallet and treated myself.”
  • A person might say, “I need to break this 50-note into smaller bills.”

24. A 50-buckaroos

This slang term refers to fifty dollars in general. It is a playful way to refer to the currency denomination.

  • For example, if someone asks you how much something costs, you might say, “It’s gonna set you back 50 buckaroos.”
  • In a discussion about saving money, someone might say, “I managed to save up 50 buckaroos this month.”
  • A person might joke, “I wish I could find 50 buckaroos on the street.”

25. A 50-smackers

Similar to “a 50-buckaroos,” this slang term also refers to fifty dollars. It is a casual and lighthearted way to talk about the currency denomination.

  • For instance, if someone asks you for money, you might say, “Sorry, I only have 50 smackers.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might mention, “I spent 50 smackers on dinner last night.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up 50 smackers for a concert ticket.”

26. A 50-clams

This slang term refers to a fifty-dollar bill. It is derived from the term “clam” which is a colloquial term for a dollar.

  • For example, “I paid 50 clams for that concert ticket.”
  • A person might say, “I owe you 50 clams for dinner.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might mention, “I spent 50 clams on groceries this week.”

27. A 50-bones

This slang term refers to a fifty-dollar bill. It is derived from the term “bone” which is a colloquial term for a dollar.

  • For instance, “I can’t believe I paid 50 bones for this shirt.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up 50 bones for a new video game.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might mention, “I set aside 50 bones for entertainment expenses.”

28. A 50-gees

This slang term refers to a fifty-dollar bill. It is derived from the term “gees” which is a colloquial term for money.

  • For example, “I spent 50 gees on this fancy dinner.”
  • A person might say, “I need to borrow 50 gees to pay my rent.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might mention, “I can’t afford to spend 50 gees on a new phone.”

29. A 50-greenbacks

This slang term refers to a fifty-dollar bill. It is derived from the color of US currency, which is predominantly green.

  • For instance, “I gave the cashier 50 greenbacks for the purchase.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up 50 greenbacks for my vacation.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, someone might mention, “My target is to save 50 greenbacks each month.”

30. A 50-dollars

This slang term simply refers to a fifty-dollar bill.

  • For example, “I owe you 50 dollars for the concert tickets.”
  • A person might say, “I need to withdraw 50 dollars from the ATM.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might mention, “I spent 50 dollars on gas this week.”

31. A fifty-buckaroonies

This slang term is used to refer to a fifty-dollar bill. It is a playful and informal way to talk about money.

  • For example, “I owe you fifty-buckaroonies for dinner last night.”
  • A person might say, “I found a fifty-buckaroonies in my old jacket pocket!”
  • Another might ask, “Can you lend me fifty-buckaroonies until payday?”

32. A half-a-C-note

This slang term is derived from the Roman numeral for one hundred (C) and is used to refer to a fifty-dollar bill. It is a casual way to talk about money.

  • For instance, “I need to withdraw a half-a-C-note from the ATM.”
  • A person might say, “I spent a half-a-C-note on concert tickets.”
  • Another might ask, “How much do you want to bet? A half-a-C-note?”

33. A half-a-century

This slang term refers to a fifty-dollar bill and is derived from the word “century” which means one hundred. It is a lighthearted way to talk about money.

  • For example, “I found a half-a-century in my coat pocket.”
  • A person might say, “I’m saving up to buy a new gadget, I already have a half-a-century.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you lend me a half-a-century until payday?”

34. A half-a-benjamin

This slang term is derived from the first name of Benjamin Franklin, whose portrait appears on the one-hundred-dollar bill. It is used to refer to a fifty-dollar bill in a playful and familiar way.

  • For instance, “I need to break a half-a-benjamin for change.”
  • A person might say, “I owe you a half-a-benjamin for that favor.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you lend me a half-a-benjamin until next week?”

35. A half-a-grant

This slang term is derived from the first name of Ulysses S. Grant, whose portrait appears on the fifty-dollar bill. It is used to refer to a fifty-dollar bill in a casual and familiar way.

  • For example, “I need to withdraw a half-a-grant from the bank.”
  • A person might say, “I spent a half-a-grant on new shoes.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you lend me a half-a-grant until payday?”

36. A half-a-fifty

This slang term refers to half of a fifty-dollar bill, or $25. It is often used when splitting a bill or sharing expenses.

  • For example, if two friends are splitting the cost of dinner, one might say, “I’ll give you a half-a-fifty for my share.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might mention, “I only have a half-a-fifty left in my wallet.”
  • A person discussing a financial transaction might say, “I can sell it to you for a half-a-fifty.”

37. Fiddy

This slang term is a shortened version of the word “fifty” and is used to refer to a fifty-dollar bill.

  • For instance, if someone owes you money, you might ask, “Can you give me a fiddy?”
  • In a discussion about expensive purchases, someone might say, “I spent a whole fiddy on these new shoes.”
  • A person sharing a shopping tip might say, “You can get a great meal for under a fiddy at that restaurant.”

38. Five dimes

This slang term refers to five ten-dollar bills, which adds up to fifty dollars. It is often used when discussing a payment or the cost of something.

  • For example, if someone owes you money, you might say, “Can you pay me back with five dimes?”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might mention, “I need to save up five dimes for that concert ticket.”
  • A person discussing a financial transaction might say, “I’ll give you this item for five dimes.”

39. Two quarters and a nickel

This slang term refers to a combination of coins that adds up to fifty cents. It consists of two quarters (each worth twenty-five cents) and one nickel (worth five cents).

  • For instance, if someone needs to pay fifty cents, they might say, “I only have two quarters and a nickel.”
  • In a discussion about loose change, someone might mention, “I found two quarters and a nickel in my pocket.”
  • A person sharing a money-saving tip might say, “You can save two quarters and a nickel every day by avoiding vending machines.”

40. Two score and ten

This slang term refers to forty dollars. It is a play on words using “score,” which means twenty, and “ten.” The term is not commonly used but can be found in older literature or historical contexts.

  • For example, in a conversation about a payment, someone might say, “I owe you two score and ten.”
  • In a discussion about historical prices, someone might mention, “Back in the day, you could buy a nice meal for two score and ten.”
  • A person discussing an old-fashioned transaction might say, “I bought this antique for two score and ten.”

41. Two finnies

This slang term refers to having two $5 bills, which adds up to a total of $10.

  • For example, “I found two finnies in my pocket and used them to buy lunch.”
  • A person might say, “I owe you $10, let me give you two finnies.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I only have two finnies left in my wallet.”

42. A pair of twenties and a ten-spot

This slang term refers to having two $20 bills and a $10 bill, which adds up to a total of $50.

  • For instance, “I had a pair of twenties and a ten-spot in my wallet, so I treated myself to a nice dinner.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to withdraw some cash because all I have is a pair of twenties and a ten-spot.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, a person might mention, “I set aside a pair of twenties and a ten-spot for groceries.”

43. Two greenbacks and a sawbuck

This slang term refers to having two $1 bills (also known as “greenbacks”) and a $10 bill (also known as a “sawbuck”), which adds up to a total of $12.

  • For example, “I found two greenbacks and a sawbuck in my pocket, but I needed more money for the concert.”
  • A person might say, “I only have two greenbacks and a sawbuck on me, so I can’t afford to buy anything expensive.”
  • In a conversation about splitting a bill, someone might mention, “I’ll pay my share with two greenbacks and a sawbuck.”

44. A half Benjamin

This slang term refers to a $50 bill, which features the portrait of Benjamin Franklin. The term “half Benjamin” implies that the bill is worth half of a $100 bill, which features Benjamin Franklin on the front.

  • For instance, “I found a half Benjamin in my wallet and used it to pay for my groceries.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to break this half Benjamin into smaller bills so I can tip the server.”
  • In a discussion about cash gifts, a person might mention, “I received a half Benjamin for my birthday.”

45. A pair of twenties and a deuce

This slang term refers to having two $20 bills and a $2 bill, which adds up to a total of $42.

  • For example, “I only had a pair of twenties and a deuce on me, so I couldn’t afford the new shoes.”
  • A person might say, “I found a pair of twenties and a deuce in my jacket pocket, I forgot I had them.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might mention, “I set aside a pair of twenties and a deuce for entertainment expenses.”

46. A double sawbuck and a tenner

This slang refers to having a total of $30, with a “sawbuck” representing a ten-dollar bill and a “tenner” representing a ten-dollar bill. The term is used to describe a specific amount of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I owe you a double sawbuck and a tenner for that favor.”
  • In a conversation about splitting a bill, someone might say, “I’ll give you a double sawbuck and a tenner for my share.”
  • Another person might comment, “I found a double sawbuck and a tenner in my old jeans pocket!”

47. A pair of tens and a fin

This slang refers to having a total of $25, with a “ten” representing a ten-dollar bill and a “fin” representing a five-dollar bill. The term is used to describe a specific amount of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll give you a pair of tens and a fin for that concert ticket.”
  • In a discussion about a purchase, someone might mention, “I found a pair of tens and a fin in my wallet, just enough for this item.”
  • Another person might comment, “I need to withdraw a pair of tens and a fin from the ATM to cover lunch.”

48. Two twenties and a five-spot

This slang refers to having a total of $45, with “twenties” representing twenty-dollar bills and a “five-spot” representing a five-dollar bill. The term is used to describe a specific amount of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll pay you back with two twenties and a five-spot for that loan.”
  • In a conversation about splitting expenses, someone might suggest, “Let’s each contribute two twenties and a five-spot for the hotel room.”
  • Another person might comment, “I found two twenties and a five-spot on the ground while walking to work!”

49. A stack of fives and a twenty

This slang refers to having a total of $25, with a “stack of fives” representing multiple five-dollar bills and a “twenty” representing a twenty-dollar bill. The term is used to describe a specific amount of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll give you a stack of fives and a twenty for that item.”
  • In a discussion about splitting costs, someone might suggest, “Let’s each contribute a stack of fives and a twenty for the meal.”
  • Another person might comment, “I found a stack of fives and a twenty in an old jacket pocket!”

50. A pair of twenties and a five-dollar bill

This slang refers to having a total of $45, with “twenties” representing twenty-dollar bills and a “five-dollar bill” representing a five-dollar bill. The term is used to describe a specific amount of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I owe you a pair of twenties and a five-dollar bill for that favor.”
  • In a conversation about splitting expenses, someone might suggest, “Let’s each contribute a pair of twenties and a five-dollar bill for the event.”
  • Another person might comment, “I found a pair of twenties and a five-dollar bill in my coat pocket!”
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