Top 36 Slang For Cold Weather – Meaning & Usage

As the temperature drops and winter approaches, it’s time to bundle up and embrace the chilly weather. But have you ever wondered what the cool kids are saying to describe this frosty season? Look no further, because we’ve got you covered with our list of the top slang for cold weather. From cozy terms that will warm your heart to icy expressions that will give you a shiver, we’ve gathered the coolest words and phrases to help you navigate the winter months like a pro. So grab a cup of hot cocoa and get ready to chill with our frosty vocabulary guide!

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1. Arctic Outside

This term is used to describe weather conditions that are extremely cold, similar to the temperatures experienced in the Arctic region.

  • For instance, “I can’t believe how cold it is outside, it feels Arctic out here!”
  • In a conversation about the winter season, someone might say, “The weather forecast says it’s going to be Arctic outside tomorrow.”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t handle this Arctic outside, I need to move to a warmer climate!”

2. Baltic

This slang term is used to describe weather that is extremely cold, often to the point of freezing.

  • For example, “I’m not leaving the house today, it’s absolutely Baltic out there!”
  • In a discussion about winter clothing, someone might say, “Make sure you bundle up, it’s going to be Baltic tomorrow.”
  • A person might comment, “I miss summer, this Baltic weather is unbearable!”

3. Bitter

This term is used to describe weather that is not only very cold, but also unpleasant and harsh.

  • For instance, “I can’t stand this bitter cold, it’s freezing!”
  • In a conversation about winter activities, someone might say, “I love skiing, but I can’t handle the bitter cold on the slopes.”
  • A person might complain, “I’m so tired of this bitter weather, I can’t wait for spring to arrive.”

4. Blustery

This slang term is used to describe weather conditions that are characterized by strong winds and cold temperatures.

  • For example, “Hold onto your hats, it’s going to be blustery outside today!”
  • In a discussion about winter storms, someone might say, “The blustery weather knocked down power lines in our neighborhood.”
  • A person might comment, “I love the sound of the wind during a blustery winter night.”

5. Bone-Chilling

This term is used to describe weather that is not only extremely cold, but also gives a deep sense of coldness that seems to penetrate to the bones.

  • For instance, “I can’t feel my fingers, it’s bone-chilling outside!”
  • In a conversation about winter temperatures, someone might say, “The wind makes it even more bone-chilling.”
  • A person might shiver and say, “I hate going outside in this bone-chilling weather.”

6. Brass Monkey Weather

This slang term refers to weather that is so cold it can freeze the balls off a brass monkey. It is often used to describe temperatures that are below freezing.

  • For example, “Stay indoors, it’s brass monkey weather out there!”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe how cold it is today, it’s brass monkey weather for sure.”
  • Another might complain, “I can’t feel my toes in this brass monkey weather!”

7. Bundle up

This phrase means to wear multiple layers of clothing in order to stay warm in cold weather. It is a common expression used to remind someone to put on extra layers before going outside.

  • For instance, “Don’t forget to bundle up before going out in the snow.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Make sure you bundle up before going to school, it’s freezing outside.”
  • Another might say, “I always bundle up with a hat, scarf, and gloves when it’s cold.”

8. Chilly

This word is used to describe a cool or cold temperature, but not extremely cold. It is often used to describe weather that is slightly below comfortable or room temperature.

  • For example, “It’s a bit chilly outside, you might want to grab a jacket.”
  • A person might comment, “The wind makes it feel even chillier than the actual temperature.”
  • Another might say, “I love taking walks in the chilly autumn weather.”

9. Crule

This slang term combines the words “cold” and “cruel” to describe weather that is both extremely cold and harsh. It is often used to emphasize the discomfort and unforgiving nature of the cold weather.

  • For instance, “I can’t stand this crule weather, it’s freezing and miserable.”
  • A person might say, “The wind chill makes it even more crule outside.”
  • Another might complain, “I can’t wait for spring, I’m tired of this crule winter weather.”

10. Dead of Winter

This phrase refers to the middle or peak of winter when temperatures are at their coldest. It is often used to describe the period of time when winter is at its most intense and severe.

  • For example, “I always feel like hibernating in the dead of winter.”
  • A person might say, “The dead of winter is the perfect time for hot chocolate and cozy blankets.”
  • Another might comment, “The dead of winter can be beautiful with all the snow, but it’s also incredibly cold.”

11. Freezing

This term is used to describe a temperature that is extremely cold or to describe the feeling of being very cold.

  • For example, “It’s freezing outside, make sure to bundle up!”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t go out in this freezing weather, it’s too cold.”
  • A person experiencing cold weather might exclaim, “I’m freezing, I need to find some warmth!”

12. Hapwarm

This term is used to describe a temperature that is slightly warm or to describe the feeling of being somewhat warm in cold weather.

  • For instance, “I put on a sweater and now I’m feeling hapwarm.”
  • Someone might say, “The sun came out and it’s making the day feel hapwarm.”
  • A person might exclaim, “This cup of hot cocoa is making me hapwarm!”

13. Nippy

This term is used to describe a temperature that is chilly or to describe the feeling of being slightly cold.

  • For example, “It’s a bit nippy outside, you might want to grab a jacket.”
  • Someone might say, “I love going for a walk on a nippy morning.”
  • A person might exclaim, “The wind is making it nippy, I need to find some shelter!”

14. Nithered

This term is used to describe a temperature that is extremely cold or to describe the feeling of being very cold.

  • For instance, “I forgot my coat and now I’m absolutely nithered.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t feel my fingers, it’s nithered out here.”
  • A person might exclaim, “The wind chill is making it nithered, I need to find some warmth!”

15. Tater

This term is used to describe a temperature that is cold or to describe the feeling of being cold.

  • For example, “I forgot my gloves and now my hands are tater.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t stand being tater, I need to find some heat.”
  • A person might exclaim, “The snow is making it tater, I need to bundle up!”

16. There’s a nip in the air

This phrase is used to describe a slight chill in the air, indicating that the weather is getting colder.

  • For example, someone might say, “There’s a nip in the air, I think winter is coming.”
  • When discussing the change in seasons, a person might say, “I love the feeling of a nip in the air, it means fall is here.”
  • A weather report might mention, “Expect a nip in the air tomorrow morning, temperatures will be dropping.”

17. Frosty

This word describes extremely cold weather or temperatures.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Bundle up, it’s going to be frosty outside.”
  • A person might comment, “I can’t stand frosty weather, I prefer warmer climates.”
  • When discussing the winter season, someone might say, “I love waking up to a frosty morning, it’s so peaceful.”

18. Brrr

This is an onomatopoeic word used to mimic the sound or feeling of being cold.

  • For example, someone might say, “Brrr, it’s freezing in here, turn up the heat.”
  • When stepping outside into the cold, a person might exclaim, “Brrr, it’s so chilly!”
  • A person might comment, “Brrr, I hate winter, it’s too cold for me.”

19. Frigid

This word describes weather or temperatures that are extremely cold.

  • For instance, someone might say, “The frigid temperatures are unbearable, I can’t wait for spring.”
  • When discussing a cold snap, a person might say, “We’re experiencing a frigid winter this year.”
  • A weather report might mention, “Bundle up, it’s going to be frigid tonight with temperatures dropping below freezing.”

20. Icy

This word describes conditions that are covered in ice or extremely cold.

  • For example, someone might say, “Be careful, the roads are icy, drive slowly.”
  • When discussing a freezing rainstorm, a person might say, “The entire city is icy, it’s dangerous to walk outside.”
  • A person might comment, “I hate walking on icy sidewalks, I always slip and fall.”

21. Polar vortex

A polar vortex refers to a large area of low pressure and cold air that surrounds the Earth’s poles. During a polar vortex, frigid air from the Arctic is pushed southward, resulting in extremely cold temperatures.

  • For example, “The polar vortex brought record-breaking cold temperatures to the Midwest.”
  • A weather report might state, “Bundle up, the polar vortex is expected to bring freezing temperatures to the region.”
  • Someone might complain, “I can’t wait for this polar vortex to be over, I’m tired of shivering all the time.”

22. Arctic blast

An arctic blast refers to a sudden and severe drop in temperature, usually caused by a mass of very cold air moving into an area from the Arctic region.

  • For instance, “The arctic blast brought freezing temperatures and heavy snowfall to the East Coast.”
  • A meteorologist might say, “Be prepared for an arctic blast, as temperatures are expected to plummet.”
  • Someone might comment, “I wasn’t ready for the arctic blast, my car wouldn’t start in the freezing cold.”

23. Cold snap

A cold snap refers to a brief period of unusually cold weather, often lasting for a few days or a week.

  • For example, “We’re experiencing a cold snap, so make sure to bundle up when you go outside.”
  • A news report might state, “Farmers are worried about their crops during this cold snap.”
  • Someone might say, “I hope this cold snap passes quickly, I miss the warmer weather.”

24. Jack frost

Jack Frost is a personification of cold weather, often depicted as a mischievous sprite or elf who brings frost and ice.

  • For instance, “I woke up to find Jack Frost had painted beautiful patterns on my window.”
  • A children’s book might describe Jack Frost as, “The playful sprite who turns everything into a winter wonderland.”
  • Someone might say, “Bundle up, Jack Frost is nipping at our noses today.”

25. Winter wonderland

Winter wonderland refers to a magical and picturesque scene created by snow and ice during the winter season.

  • For example, “The fresh snowfall turned the city into a winter wonderland.”
  • A travel brochure might advertise, “Experience the charm of a winter wonderland in our mountain resort.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “Look outside, it’s a winter wonderland! Let’s go build a snowman!”

26. Snowpocalypse

This term is used to describe an extreme snowstorm or blizzard that causes significant disruption and chaos.

  • For example, “The city was completely shut down during the Snowpocalypse.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe how much snow we got. It’s a Snowpocalypse out there!”
  • A news headline might read, “Residents brace for Snowpocalypse, stock up on supplies.”

27. Slushy

This term refers to snow or ice that has started to melt, creating a wet and slushy mixture.

  • For instance, “Be careful when walking on the sidewalks, they’re covered in slushy.”
  • A person might say, “My shoes got soaked in the slushy mess on the streets.”
  • A weather report might mention, “Expect slushy conditions on the roads due to the warming temperatures.”

28. Shiver me timbers

This phrase is used to express feeling very cold, often in a humorous or exaggerated way.

  • For example, “Shiver me timbers, it’s freezing outside!”
  • A person might say, “I forgot my jacket and now I’m shivering me timbers.”
  • Someone might comment, “The wind chill is making me shiver me timbers.”

29. Cold as ice

This phrase is used to describe a temperature that is extremely cold.

  • For instance, “The water in the lake is cold as ice.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t go outside without a jacket, it’s cold as ice.”
  • A weather forecast might state, “Bundle up, temperatures will be cold as ice tonight.”

30. Winter chill

This term refers to the cold weather experienced during the winter season.

  • For example, “I love bundling up and embracing the winter chill.”
  • A person might say, “The winter chill is in the air, time to break out the warm coats.”
  • Someone might comment, “I can’t wait for the winter chill to start, I love the snow.”

31. Arctic

Refers to extremely cold temperatures, often associated with the Arctic region.

  • For example, “I can’t handle this arctic weather, I need to bundle up!”
  • Someone might say, “The wind chill makes it feel like we’re in the Arctic.”
  • A person might complain, “I hate driving in Arctic conditions, the roads are so icy.”

32. Brisk

Describes cool, refreshing temperatures that are invigorating but not extremely cold.

  • For instance, “It’s a bit brisk outside, but perfect for a walk.”
  • Someone might say, “I love the brisk air in the morning, it wakes me up.”
  • A person might comment, “The brisk wind is making my cheeks rosy.”

33. Polar

Refers to very cold temperatures, similar to those found in the polar regions.

  • For example, “I can’t go outside without my coat, it’s polar out there.”
  • Someone might say, “The polar weather is unbearable, I’m staying indoors.”
  • A person might comment, “I love the beauty of polar landscapes, but I can’t handle the cold.”

34. Wintry

Describes weather conditions that are characteristic of winter, including cold temperatures and snow.

  • For instance, “I love the wintry weather, it makes everything look magical.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m dreaming of a wintry Christmas with snow falling.”
  • A person might comment, “The wintry conditions are perfect for skiing and snowboarding.”

35. Gelid

Refers to extremely cold temperatures that feel icy and freezing.

  • For example, “The gelid wind is cutting through my clothes.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t feel my fingers, it’s so gelid outside.”
  • A person might comment, “The gelid water is too cold for swimming.”

36. Snowy

This term refers to something that is covered in snow or experiencing snowy conditions.

  • For example, “The mountain peak was snowy and beautiful.”
  • A person might say, “I love taking walks on snowy days.”
  • Another might comment, “The roads are dangerous when they’re snowy, so be careful when driving.”
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