Top 44 Slang For 500 Dollars – Meaning & Usage

Money talks, and so does slang! Whether you’re a seasoned hustler or just looking to expand your financial vocabulary, we’ve got you covered with our list of top slang for 500 dollars. From Benjamin to Big Ones, we’ll take you on a linguistic journey through the world of money. Get ready to up your slang game and impress your friends with your newfound financial fluency!

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1. Monkey

This slang term refers to $500. It is believed to have originated from the Indian rupee note, which featured a monkey on it and was worth 500 rupees. The term “monkey” is often used in informal conversations or in certain subcultures.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just won $500 at the casino, a whole monkey!”
  • In a discussion about saving money, a person might say, “I managed to save up a monkey for my vacation.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me a monkey? I’ll pay you back next week.”

2. Grand

In slang terms, “grand” is used to refer to one thousand dollars. The term is believed to have originated from the Latin word “grandis,” meaning great. It is commonly used in various contexts, including finance, music, and everyday conversations.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just made a grand selling my old car.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, a person might mention, “I need to save up five grand for my wedding.”
  • A musician might say, “I got paid a grand for that gig last night.”

3. G

The slang term “G” is used as an abbreviation for “grand,” which means a thousand dollars. It is commonly used in informal conversations, especially among younger generations or in certain subcultures.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made 10 G’s from that side hustle.”
  • In a discussion about buying a new phone, a person might mention, “It’s gonna cost me 1.5 G’s.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me a couple of G’s? I’ll pay you back next month.”

4. Stack

The term “stack” is slang for $1,000. It is used to refer to a stack of one hundred dollar bills, which adds up to a thousand dollars. The term is commonly used in urban culture or in discussions related to money and wealth.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just made a stack from my latest business venture.”
  • In a conversation about financial goals, a person might mention, “I’m trying to save up five stacks for a down payment.”
  • A rapper might boast, “I’m making stacks on stacks with my new album.”

5. Band

The slang term “band” is used to refer to $1,000. It is believed to have originated from the idea of a stack of money being wrapped with a rubber band. The term is commonly used in hip-hop culture or in conversations related to money and success.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made a band from my latest gig.”
  • In a discussion about luxury purchases, a person might mention, “I spent two bands on that designer handbag.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me a band? I’ll pay you back next week.”

6. Sawbuck

A “sawbuck” is slang for a ten-dollar bill. The term originated from the resemblance of the Roman numeral X (representing ten) to the legs of a sawbuck, a device used to hold logs for sawing.

  • For example, someone might say, “I paid a sawbuck for that cup of coffee.”
  • In a conversation about money, one might mention, “I found a sawbuck in my pocket and was pleasantly surprised.”
  • A person might complain, “I had to give up a sawbuck just to park my car.”

7. C-note

A “C-note” is a slang term for a one hundred-dollar bill. The “C” stands for “centum,” which is Latin for one hundred.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to break a C-note to pay for this meal.”
  • In a discussion about finances, one might mention, “I saved up a few C-notes for a vacation.”
  • A person might boast, “I made a couple of C-notes from selling my old belongings.”

8. Five bills

“Five bills” is a slang term for a five hundred-dollar bill. It refers to the fact that the bill has a value of five hundred units of currency.

  • For example, someone might say, “I had to break five bills to pay for that expensive item.”
  • In a conversation about large sums of money, one might mention, “I wish I had a stack of five bills.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I found five bills in an old jacket pocket!”

9. Jackson

A “Jackson” is slang for a twenty-dollar bill. The term is derived from the portrait of Andrew Jackson, the seventh President of the United States, that appears on the bill.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to withdraw a few Jacksons from the ATM.”
  • In a discussion about money, one might mention, “I only have a couple of Jacksons left in my wallet.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break a Jackson for me? I need change for the bus.”

10. Dub

A “dub” is slang for a twenty-dollar bill. The term originated from “double sawbuck,” with “sawbuck” being slang for a ten-dollar bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I paid a dub for that concert ticket.”
  • In a conversation about finances, one might mention, “I need to save up a few dubs for a new phone.”
  • A person might brag, “I made a dub from selling my old video games.”

11. Pony

In British slang, a “pony” is a term used to refer to £25. It comes from Cockney rhyming slang, where “pony and trap” rhymes with “crap,” which is slang for money.

  • For example, “I owe you a pony for that favor.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might say, “It cost me a pony to fix my car.”
  • A person discussing a bet might say, “I put a pony on that horse to win.”

12. Bullseye

In British slang, a “bullseye” is a term used to refer to £50. It comes from Cockney rhyming slang, where “bullseye’s a quid” rhymes with “squid,” which is slang for money.

  • For instance, “I found a bullseye in my pocket.”
  • In a discussion about the cost of a concert ticket, someone might say, “I paid a bullseye for the front row seats.”
  • A person bragging about a successful investment might say, “I made a bullseye on that stock.”

13. Bobby

In British slang, a “bobby” is a term used to refer to £100. It comes from Cockney rhyming slang, where “bobby moore” rhymes with “score,” which is slang for money.

  • For example, “I can lend you a bobby for the weekend.”
  • In a conversation about a large purchase, someone might say, “It cost me a bobby to buy that new TV.”
  • A person talking about a bonus might say, “I received a bobby for my hard work.”

14. Lady

In British slang, a “lady” is a term used to refer to £500. It comes from Cockney rhyming slang, where “lady Godiva” rhymes with “fiver,” which is slang for money.

  • For instance, “Can you lend me a lady to cover my expenses?”
  • In a discussion about the price of a vacation, someone might say, “It cost me a lady to book the flights.”
  • A person talking about a significant amount of cash might say, “I’ve got a lady in my pocket.”

15. Darwin

In British slang, a “Darwin” is a term used to refer to £10. It comes from Cockney rhyming slang, where “Darwin” rhymes with “tenner,” which is slang for money.

  • For example, “I found a Darwin on the street.”
  • In a conversation about splitting the bill, someone might say, “I’ll give you a Darwin for my share.”
  • A person discussing the cost of a taxi ride might say, “It cost me a Darwin to get home.”

16. Commodore

This slang term refers to the 500-dollar bill in some countries, particularly in the United States. The term “Commodore” is used because the bill features a portrait of Commodore Matthew Perry, an American naval officer.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t believe he paid me back with a Commodore!”
  • In a conversation about currency, one might ask, “Do they still print Commodores?”
  • A person discussing rare banknotes might mention, “The Commodore is highly sought after by collectors.”

17. Deep Sea Diver

In some contexts, “Deep Sea Diver” is used as slang to refer to a 500-dollar bill. The term is used due to the deep blue color of the bill, which resembles the color of the ocean depths.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He handed me a Deep Sea Diver for payment.”
  • In a discussion about slang for money, one might mention, “Have you ever heard of calling a 500-dollar bill a Deep Sea Diver?”
  • A person talking about unique nicknames for banknotes might say, “I’ve heard them called Deep Sea Divers, but never knew why.”

18. Winston

In certain contexts, “Winston” is used as a slang term for a 500-dollar bill. The origin of this term is unclear, but it may have originated from the brand name “Winston” being associated with wealth and luxury.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to save up a few Winstons before I can afford that.”
  • In a conversation about money, one might ask, “Do you have any Winstons on you?”
  • A person discussing slang for currency might mention, “Have you ever heard of calling a 500-dollar bill a Winston?”

19. Cockle

In some regions, “Cockle” is used as a slang term for a 500-dollar bill. The origin of this term is uncertain, but it may be derived from “cockle shells,” which were once used as a form of currency.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I had to hand over a few Cockles to cover the expense.”
  • In a discussion about slang for money, one might mention, “Cockle is an interesting term for a 500-dollar bill.”
  • A person talking about unique nicknames for banknotes might say, “I’ve heard them called Cockles, but I’m not sure why.”

20. Ayrton

In certain contexts, “Ayrton” is used as a slang term for a 500-dollar bill. The origin of this term is unclear, but it may have originated from the name of the Brazilian Formula One racing driver Ayrton Senna, who was associated with wealth and success.

  • For example, someone might say, “I had to pay him back with an Ayrton.”
  • In a conversation about money, one might ask, “Have you ever heard of calling a 500-dollar bill an Ayrton?”
  • A person discussing unique nicknames for banknotes might mention, “Ayrton is an interesting term for a 500-dollar bill.”

21. Five hundo

This slang term refers to a sum of five hundred dollars.

  • For example, “I just spent five hundo on a new pair of sneakers.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up five hundo for my upcoming vacation.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might mention, “I paid five hundo for my car repair.”

22. Five large

This slang term is used to represent a sum of five thousand dollars. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For instance, “I just won five large in a poker game.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up five large for a down payment on a house.”
  • In a discussion about a high-priced item, someone might mention, “That luxury watch costs five large.”

23. Half a grand

This slang term refers to a sum of five hundred dollars. It is derived from the term “grand,” which is slang for one thousand dollars.

  • For example, “I paid half a grand for this new phone.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up half a grand for my rent.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might mention, “I spent half a grand on groceries this month.”

24. Half a stack

This slang term represents a sum of five hundred dollars. It is derived from the term “stack,” which is slang for one thousand dollars.

  • For instance, “I just made half a stack from selling my old video games.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up half a stack for my upcoming trip.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might mention, “I have half a stack in my emergency fund.”

25. Five Benjamins

This slang term refers to a sum of five hundred dollars, specifically in the form of five one hundred dollar bills. It is a reference to Benjamin Franklin, whose portrait is featured on the one hundred dollar bill.

  • For example, “I just found five Benjamins in my jacket pocket.”
  • A person might say, “I need to withdraw five Benjamins from the bank.”
  • In a conversation about cash, someone might mention, “I always carry at least five Benjamins with me.”

26. Five C-notes

This slang term refers to five one-hundred dollar bills. It is named after the “C” in “C-note,” which is a common abbreviation for a one-hundred dollar bill in the United States.

  • For example, “I just won five C-notes in a poker game!”
  • A person might say, “I saved up five C-notes to buy a new phone.”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, someone might mention, “That purse costs five C-notes!”

27. Five greenbacks

This slang term refers to five one-dollar bills. The term “greenbacks” comes from the green color of U.S. currency.

  • For instance, “I found five greenbacks in my pocket.”
  • A person might say, “I need to break a twenty. Can you give me five greenbacks?”
  • In a discussion about tipping, someone might mention, “I always leave at least five greenbacks for good service.”

28. Five bones

This slang term refers to five dollars. It is named after the “bone” in “bones,” which is a common slang term for a dollar bill.

  • For example, “I owe you five bones.”
  • A person might say, “I spent five bones on a cup of coffee.”
  • In a conversation about a small amount of money, someone might mention, “It’s just five bones. No big deal.”

29. Five smackers

This slang term refers to five dollars. It is named after the “smack” in “smackers,” which is a colloquial term for a dollar.

  • For instance, “I found five smackers on the ground.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll give you five smackers if you help me carry these boxes.”
  • In a discussion about the cost of lunch, someone might mention, “I can’t believe I spent five smackers on a sandwich.”

30. Five dimes

This slang term refers to fifty dollars. It is named after the “dime” in “dimes,” which is a common slang term for a ten-dollar bill.

  • For example, “I just made five dimes selling my old textbooks.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up five dimes for concert tickets.”
  • In a conversation about a significant amount of money, someone might mention, “I can’t believe he lost five dimes gambling.”

31. Five big ones

This slang term refers to five hundred dollars. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, “I just spent five big ones on a new TV.”
  • A person might say, “I owe you five big ones for that favor.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might mention, “I need to save up five big ones for my vacation.”

32. Five stacks

This slang term also refers to five hundred dollars. It is commonly used in urban or hip-hop culture.

  • For instance, “He dropped five stacks on those new sneakers.”
  • A person might say, “I’m trying to save up five stacks for a down payment.”
  • In a discussion about money, someone might mention, “I had to pay five stacks for that car repair.”

33. Five G’s

This slang term stands for five grand, which is a thousand dollars. It is often used to refer to a significant amount of money.

  • For example, “I just made five G’s from that freelance gig.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up five G’s for a new computer.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might mention, “I spent five G’s on home renovations.”

34. Five clams

This slang term is another way to refer to five hundred dollars. It is a more lighthearted or playful expression.

  • For instance, “I found five clams in my pocket.”
  • A person might say, “I owe you five clams for that bet.”
  • In a discussion about expenses, someone might mention, “I need to budget five clams for groceries this week.”

35. Five gees

This slang term is a variation of “five G’s” and also refers to five hundred dollars. It is commonly used in casual or informal conversations.

  • For example, “I just spent five gees on concert tickets.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up five gees for a down payment.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might mention, “I made five gees from selling my old furniture.”

36. Five large ones

This slang term refers to five hundred dollars. It is often used casually or informally in conversation.

  • For example, “I just spent five large ones on a new laptop.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might say, “I need to save up five large ones for my vacation.”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t believe I had to pay five large ones for car repairs.”

37. Five grand

This slang term refers to five thousand dollars. It is commonly used in casual conversation or when talking about money.

  • For instance, “I won five grand in the lottery!”
  • In a discussion about a large purchase, someone might say, “I paid five grand for this vintage guitar.”
  • A person might brag, “I make five grand a month at my job.”

38. Five hundos

This slang term refers to five hundred dollars. It is a more informal way of saying “five hundred” and is often used in casual conversation.

  • For example, “I owe you five hundos for the concert tickets.”
  • In a discussion about expenses, someone might say, “I spent five hundos on groceries this week.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me five hundos until payday?”

39. Five yards

This slang term refers to five hundred dollars. It is a more casual way of saying “five hundred” and is commonly used in conversation.

  • For instance, “I need to save up five yards for a new phone.”
  • In a discussion about a recent purchase, someone might say, “I spent five yards on this designer handbag.”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t believe I had to pay five yards for car repairs.”

40. Five hunnies

This slang term refers to five hundred dollars. It is a more playful or lighthearted way of saying “five hundred” and is often used in casual conversation.

  • For example, “I just won five hunnies at the casino!”
  • In a discussion about saving money, someone might say, “I need to set aside five hunnies each month.”
  • A person might joke, “I wish I could find five hunnies on the ground.”

41. Five century

This is a slang term used to refer to five hundred dollars. It is derived from the fact that “century” is a word used to describe a period of one hundred years, and “five century” would therefore represent five hundred.

  • For example, “I spent five century on a new pair of shoes.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might say, “I had to pay five century for car repairs.”
  • A person might boast, “I saved up five century to buy a new phone.”

42. Five Franklins

This is a slang term used to refer to five hundred dollars. It originates from the image of Benjamin Franklin, whose portrait appears on the one hundred dollar bill. Therefore, “five Franklins” would represent five hundred dollars.

  • For instance, “I earned five Franklins for completing a freelance project.”
  • In a discussion about the cost of an item, someone might say, “I paid five Franklins for this designer handbag.”
  • A person might complain, “I lost five Franklins at the casino last night.”

43. Five blue faces

This is a slang term used to refer to five hundred dollars. It is derived from the color of the one hundred dollar bill, which is predominantly green. The term “blue faces” is used to describe the blue-toned portrait of Benjamin Franklin on the bill.

  • For example, “I owed my friend five blue faces and finally paid him back.”
  • In a conversation about financial goals, someone might say, “I’m trying to save up five blue faces for a vacation.”
  • A person might brag, “I made five blue faces in tips at my serving job last night.”

44. Five dough

This is a slang term used to refer to five hundred dollars. It is derived from the term “dough,” which is a colloquial term for money. “Five dough” therefore represents five hundred dollars.

  • For instance, “I need to withdraw five dough from the ATM.”
  • In a discussion about a purchase, someone might say, “I spent five dough on concert tickets.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I found five dough in my jacket pocket!”
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