Top 55 Slang For Hello – Meaning & Usage

In a world where greetings are evolving faster than ever, it can be hard to keep up with the latest slang for hello. Whether you’re looking to impress your friends or simply want to stay in the loop, we’ve got you covered. Our team of language enthusiasts have scoured the depths of the internet to bring you a list of the most popular and trendy greetings that are sure to make you feel like the coolest kid on the block. So, get ready to level up your greeting game and say hello in style!

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1. Hey

This is a casual way to say hello to someone. It is commonly used among friends or acquaintances.

  • For example, “Hey, how’s it going?”
  • A person might say, “Hey, what’s up?” to start a conversation.
  • In a text message, someone might simply say, “Hey!” to greet a friend.

2. Hi

This is a common and polite way to say hello to someone. It is appropriate in most situations and can be used with anyone.

  • For instance, “Hi, nice to meet you.”
  • A person might say, “Hi, how can I help you?” in a professional setting.
  • In a phone call, someone might answer with, “Hi, who is this?”

3. Yo

This is a slang term used to say hello to someone. It is often used among friends or in informal settings.

  • For example, “Yo, what’s up?”
  • A person might say, “Yo, long time no see!” to greet an old friend.
  • In a text message, someone might say, “Yo, you coming to the party?”

4. What’s up?

This is a common way to ask someone how they are or what they are doing. It is often used among friends or in casual conversations.

  • For instance, “Hey, what’s up?”
  • A person might say, “What’s up with you?” to start a conversation.
  • In a text message, someone might ask, “What’s up tonight?”

5. Howdy

This is a slang term used to say hello, especially in Southern regions of the United States. It is often associated with a friendly and welcoming attitude.

  • For example, “Howdy, y’all!”
  • A person might say, “Howdy, partner!” in a Western-themed event.
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “Howdy, how’s your day going?”

6. Sup?

This is a casual greeting used to ask someone how they are or what they are currently doing. It is a shortened form of “What’s up?”

  • For instance, a friend might text you, “Sup? Wanna hang out tonight?”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “Sup? Long time no see!”
  • When answering the phone, a person might say, “Hey, sup?”

7. G’day

This is a greeting commonly used in Australia, short for “good day”. It is often used as a substitute for “hello” or “hi”.

  • For example, when meeting someone in Australia, you might say, “G’day, mate!”
  • In a conversation with an Australian friend, you might say, “G’day! How’s it going?”
  • An Australian might answer the phone with, “G’day, who’s calling?”

8. Salut

This is a casual greeting used in French-speaking countries, equivalent to “hello” or “hi” in English.

  • For instance, when entering a room, you might say, “Salut, everyone!”
  • In a conversation with a French-speaking friend, you might say, “Salut! Comment ça va?” (Hello! How are you?)
  • When answering the phone, a person might say, “Salut, qui est à l’appareil?” (Hello, who is calling?)

9. Ciao

This is a casual greeting used in Italian, equivalent to both “hello” and “goodbye” in English. It can be used to greet someone or bid them farewell.

  • For example, when meeting a friend in Italy, you might say, “Ciao! Come stai?” (Hello! How are you?)
  • In a conversation with an Italian-speaking friend, you might say, “Ciao! Ci vediamo dopo!” (Goodbye! See you later!)
  • When answering the phone, a person might say, “Ciao, chi parla?” (Hello, who is speaking?)

10. Aloha

This is a greeting commonly used in Hawaii, equivalent to both “hello” and “goodbye” in English. It is also associated with the Hawaiian spirit of love, peace, and hospitality.

  • For instance, when arriving in Hawaii, you might be greeted with “Aloha! Welcome to the islands!”
  • In a conversation with a Hawaiian friend, you might say, “Aloha! How’s it going?”
  • When leaving a gathering in Hawaii, you might say, “Aloha! Mahalo for the great time!”

11. Hola

Hola is the Spanish word for hello. It is commonly used to greet someone in Spanish-speaking countries or when speaking Spanish.

  • For example, when meeting someone in Spain, you might say, “Hola, ¿cómo estás?” which means “Hello, how are you?”
  • In a conversation with a Spanish-speaking friend, you might greet them with a simple “Hola!”
  • If you’re learning Spanish and want to practice, you might start a conversation with “¡Hola! ¿Podemos hablar en español?” which means “Hello! Can we speak in Spanish?”

12. Bonjour

Bonjour is the French word for hello. It is commonly used to greet someone in French-speaking countries or when speaking French.

  • For instance, when meeting someone in France, you might say, “Bonjour, comment ça va?” which means “Hello, how are you?”
  • In a conversation with a French-speaking colleague, you might greet them with a friendly “Bonjour!”
  • If you’re learning French and want to practice, you might start a conversation with “Bonjour! Parlez-vous français?” which means “Hello! Do you speak French?”

13. Konnichiwa

Konnichiwa is the Japanese word for hello. It is commonly used to greet someone in Japan or when speaking Japanese.

  • For example, when meeting someone in Japan, you might say, “Konnichiwa, ogenki desu ka?” which means “Hello, how are you?”
  • In a conversation with a Japanese friend, you might greet them with a cheerful “Konnichiwa!”
  • If you’re learning Japanese and want to practice, you might start a conversation with “Konnichiwa! Nihongo ga hanasemasu ka?” which means “Hello! Can you speak Japanese?”

14. Namaste

Namaste is a greeting commonly used in India and Nepal. It is a respectful way to say hello, often accompanied by a slight bow or placing the palms together in front of the chest.

  • For instance, when meeting someone in India, you might say, “Namaste, kaise ho?” which means “Hello, how are you?”
  • In a yoga class, the instructor might greet the students with a warm “Namaste.”
  • If you’re learning Hindi and want to practice, you might start a conversation with “Namaste! Aap Hindi samajhte hain?” which means “Hello! Do you understand Hindi?”

15. Salaam

Salaam is the Arabic word for hello. It is commonly used to greet someone in Arabic-speaking countries or when speaking Arabic.

  • For example, when meeting someone in Saudi Arabia, you might say, “As-salamu alaykum” which means “Hello, peace be upon you.”
  • In a conversation with an Arabic-speaking friend, you might greet them with “Salaam!”
  • If you’re learning Arabic and want to practice, you might start a conversation with “Salaam! Hal tatakallam al-arabiyya?” which means “Hello! Do you speak Arabic?”

16. Shalom

This is a Hebrew word that means “peace” and is used as a greeting. It is commonly used among Jewish people and in Israel.

  • For example, a person might say, “Shalom! How are you today?”
  • When meeting someone for the first time, it is common to say, “Shalom, nice to meet you.”
  • A Jewish person might use the word when entering a synagogue, saying, “Shalom, I am here to pray.”

17. Hallo

This is a variant spelling of “hello” and is used as a greeting in various European languages. It is commonly used in German-speaking countries.

  • For instance, when answering the phone, a person might say, “Hallo, who is this?”
  • When seeing a friend on the street, one might say, “Hallo, long time no see!”
  • A person might use the word when entering a room full of people, saying, “Hallo everyone, how are you doing?”

18. Hej

This is a Swedish word that is used as a casual greeting. It is commonly used in Sweden and other Scandinavian countries.

  • For example, when meeting a friend, one might say, “Hej, how have you been?”
  • When passing someone on the street, a person might say, “Hej, have a great day!”
  • A person might use the word when entering a café, saying, “Hej, can I get a coffee please?”

19. Merhaba

This is a Turkish word that is used as a greeting. It is commonly used in Turkey and other Turkish-speaking countries.

  • For instance, when meeting someone for the first time, one might say, “Merhaba, nice to meet you.”
  • When answering the phone, a person might say, “Merhaba, how can I help you?”
  • A person might use the word when entering a store, saying, “Merhaba, I’m looking for a gift.”

20. Privet

This is a Russian word that is used as a greeting. It is commonly used in Russia and other Russian-speaking countries.

  • For example, when meeting a friend, one might say, “Privet, how have you been?”
  • When entering a room full of people, a person might say, “Privet everyone, I hope you’re all doing well.”
  • A person might use the word when answering the phone, saying, “Privet, who is calling?”

21. Dia duit

This phrase is a traditional Irish greeting meaning “good day” or “hello.” It is commonly used in Ireland and among Irish speakers.

  • For example, when meeting someone in Ireland, you might say, “Dia duit!”
  • In a conversation, you might hear, “Dia duit! Conas atá tú?” which means “Hello! How are you?”
  • When leaving, you can say, “Slán agat! Dia is Muire duit!” meaning “Goodbye! God and Mary be with you!”

22. Sawasdee

This is a common greeting in the Thai language, used to say “hello” or “hi.” It is a polite and formal way to address someone.

  • For instance, when entering a shop in Thailand, you might hear the shopkeeper say, “Sawasdee kha” (if spoken by a female) or “Sawasdee krub” (if spoken by a male).
  • When meeting someone for the first time, you can say, “Sawasdee kha/krub, I’m [your name].”
  • In a casual conversation, you might hear, “Sawasdee mai?,” which means “How are you?”

23. Xin chào

This is a common greeting in Vietnamese, used to say “hello” or “hi.” It is a polite and formal way to address someone.

  • For example, when meeting someone in Vietnam, you can say, “Xin chào!”
  • In a conversation, you might hear, “Xin chào! Bạn có khỏe không?” which means “Hello! How are you?”
  • When leaving, you can say, “Tạm biệt! Xin chào!” meaning “Goodbye! Hello!”

24. Kumusta

This is a common greeting in Filipino, used to ask “how are you?” or “how’s it going?” It is a casual and friendly way to start a conversation.

  • For instance, when meeting someone in the Philippines, you might say, “Kumusta?”
  • In a conversation, you can ask, “Kumusta ka?” which means “How are you?”
  • When replying, you can say, “Mabuti naman. Kumusta ka?” meaning “I’m good. How about you?”

25. Selamat

This is a general term used in various languages in Southeast Asia, such as Malay and Indonesian, to convey greetings or well-wishes. It can be used to say “hello,” “goodbye,” or “congratulations,” depending on the context.

  • For example, in Malaysia, you might hear “Selamat datang” which means “welcome.”
  • In a conversation, you can say “Selamat pagi” (good morning), “Selamat tengah hari” (good afternoon), or “Selamat malam” (good evening).
  • When leaving, you can say “Selamat tinggal” which means “goodbye.”

26. Jambo

Jambo is a Swahili greeting that is commonly used in East Africa. It is a casual way to say hello and is often used to greet friends or acquaintances.

  • For example, when meeting someone in Kenya, you might say, “Jambo!”
  • If you want to ask how someone is doing, you can say, “Jambo, habari?”
  • When leaving, you can say, “Kwaheri, jambo!”

27. Kia ora

Kia ora is a Māori greeting that is commonly used in New Zealand. It can be used to say hello, thank you, or as a general expression of goodwill.

  • For instance, when entering a Māori marae (meeting grounds), you might say, “Kia ora!”
  • If someone gives you a gift, you can say, “Kia ora!” as a way of saying thank you.
  • When meeting someone for the first time, you can say, “Kia ora, nice to meet you!”

28. Marhaba

Marhaba is an Arabic greeting that is commonly used in the Middle East. It is a friendly way to say hello and is often used to welcome someone or show hospitality.

  • For example, when entering someone’s home in Saudi Arabia, you might say, “Marhaba!”
  • If you see a friend on the street, you can say, “Marhaba, kifak?” which means hello, how are you?
  • When leaving, you can say, “Marhaba, ma’a salama!” which means hello, goodbye!
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29. Salve

Salve is a Latin greeting that is commonly used in formal settings or in academic contexts. It is a respectful way to say hello and is often used to greet someone of higher status.

  • For instance, when meeting a professor, you might say, “Salve, professor!”
  • In a formal ceremony, you can say, “Salve, distinguished guests!”
  • When addressing a group of people, you can say, “Salve, everyone!”

30. Ayubowan

Ayubowan is a Sinhala greeting that is commonly used in Sri Lanka. It is a warm way to say hello and is often used to welcome someone or wish them well.

  • For example, when entering a Buddhist temple in Sri Lanka, you might say, “Ayubowan!”
  • If someone is going on a trip, you can say, “Ayubowan, have a safe journey!”
  • When meeting someone for the first time, you can say, “Ayubowan, nice to meet you!”

31. Sawubona

This is a Zulu greeting that means “I see you” or “I acknowledge you.” It is a way of recognizing someone’s presence and showing respect.

  • For example, when meeting someone for the first time, you can say, “Sawubona!”
  • When entering a room, you might greet everyone by saying, “Sawubona, everyone!”
  • It can also be used as a farewell, like saying, “Sawubona, until we meet again.”

32. Habari

This is a Swahili greeting that means “What’s the news?” or “How are you?” It is a common way of asking someone about their well-being or what’s happening in their life.

  • For instance, when meeting a friend, you can say, “Habari za leo?” which means “What’s the news today?”
  • When answering the greeting, you can say, “Nzuri,” which means “I’m fine.”
  • It can also be used as a general greeting, like saying, “Habari yako?” which means “How are you?”

33. Bonjourno

This is an Italian greeting that means “Good day.” It is a friendly way of saying hello and wishing someone a pleasant day.

  • For example, when entering a shop, you can say, “Bonjourno!” to the shopkeeper.
  • When meeting someone for the first time, you can say, “Bonjourno, nice to meet you.”
  • It can also be used as a goodbye, like saying, “Bonjourno, see you later.”

34. Dobry den

This is a Czech greeting that means “Good day.” It is a polite way of saying hello and acknowledging someone’s presence.

  • For instance, when entering a room, you can say, “Dobry den!” to greet everyone.
  • When meeting someone for the first time, you can say, “Dobry den, my name is…”
  • It can also be used as a goodbye, like saying, “Dobry den, have a nice day.”

35. Goddag

This is a Danish greeting that means “Good day.” It is a formal way of saying hello and wishing someone a good day.

  • For example, when entering an office, you can say, “Goddag!” to greet the receptionist.
  • When meeting someone for the first time, you can say, “Goddag, pleased to meet you.”
  • It can also be used as a goodbye, like saying, “Goddag, see you tomorrow.”

36. Szia

This is a casual way to say hello in Hungarian. It can be used in both formal and informal settings.

  • For example, when greeting a friend, you might say, “Szia, hogyan vagy?” (Hi, how are you?)
  • When entering a store, you can greet the shopkeeper with “Szia!”
  • In a more formal setting, you might say “Szia, örülök hogy találkoztunk!” (Hello, nice to meet you!)
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37. Olá

This is the Portuguese word for hello. It is commonly used in Brazil and other Portuguese-speaking countries.

  • For instance, when answering the phone, you might say “Olá, quem fala?” (Hello, who is speaking?)
  • When greeting a friend, you can say “Olá, como você está?” (Hello, how are you?)
  • In a business setting, you might greet a client with “Olá, seja bem-vindo!” (Hello, welcome!)

38. Ahoj

This is a casual way to say hello in Czech and Slovak. It can be used in both formal and informal settings.

  • For example, when greeting a friend, you might say “Ahoj, jak se máš?” (Hello, how are you?)
  • When entering a shop, you can greet the shopkeeper with “Ahoj!”
  • In a more formal setting, you might say “Ahoj, těší mě!” (Hello, nice to meet you!)

39. Salam

This is a common greeting in Arabic-speaking countries. It is used to say hello and can also mean peace.

  • For instance, when greeting a friend, you might say “Salam, keefak?” (Hello, how are you?)
  • When entering a room, you can greet everyone with a general “Salam!”
  • In a religious context, you might say “Assalamu alaikum” (Peace be upon you) as a form of greeting.

40. Zdravo

This is a casual way to say hello in Serbian, Croatian, Bosnian, and Montenegrin. It can be used in both formal and informal settings.

  • For example, when greeting a friend, you might say “Zdravo, kako si?” (Hello, how are you?)
  • When entering a store, you can greet the shopkeeper with “Zdravo!”
  • In a more formal setting, you might say “Zdravo, drago mi je!” (Hello, nice to meet you!)
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41. Hiya

Hiya is a casual and friendly way to say hello. It is often used among friends or acquaintances.

  • For example, “Hiya, how’s it going?”
  • A person might use hiya to greet someone they haven’t seen in a while by saying, “Hiya, long time no see!”
  • In a text message, someone might start the conversation with, “Hiya! What’s up?”

42. How’s it going?

This phrase is a common way to ask someone how they are doing or how things are going in their life. It is often used as a casual greeting.

  • For instance, “Hey, how’s it going?”
  • Someone might reply with, “It’s going well, thanks for asking. How about you?”
  • In a conversation, a person might say, “I haven’t seen you in a while, how’s it going?”

43. Wassup?

Wassup is a slang variation of the phrase “What’s up?” It is a casual way to greet someone and ask about their current situation or what they have been up to.

  • For example, “Hey, wassup?”
  • A person might respond with, “Not much, just hanging out. Wassup with you?”
  • In a text message, someone might start the conversation with, “Wassup? How’s your day going?”

44. Howdy-do

Howdy-do is a colloquial and informal way to say hello. It is often associated with Southern American English and is commonly used in rural or western regions.

  • For instance, “Howdy-do, partner!”
  • A person might use howdy-do to greet someone they know by saying, “Howdy-do, neighbor!”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might start with, “Howdy-do, folks?”

45. Greetings

Greetings is a more formal or generic way to say hello. It is often used in professional or formal settings.

  • For example, “Greetings, ladies and gentlemen.”
  • A person might use greetings to address a group of people by saying, “Greetings, everyone!”
  • In a formal email or letter, someone might start with, “Greetings, [Recipient’s Name].”

46. Hey there

A casual way of saying hello or getting someone’s attention. It is often used among friends or acquaintances.

  • For example, “Hey there, how’s it going?”
  • Someone might use this greeting in a text message, saying “Hey there! Just wanted to check in.”
  • When meeting someone for the first time, you could say, “Hey there, nice to meet you.”

47. What’s happening?

This phrase is used to inquire about what someone is currently doing or experiencing.

  • For instance, “Hey, what’s happening with you?”
  • If you haven’t seen a friend in a while, you might ask, “What’s happening in your life these days?”
  • In a casual conversation, you could say, “So, what’s happening with work?”

48. How’s life?

This phrase is used to ask about someone’s general state or how things are going in their life.

  • For example, “Hey, how’s life treating you?”
  • If you want to catch up with a friend, you might ask, “So, how’s life been for you lately?”
  • When checking in on someone, you could say, “Just wanted to see how life is going for you.”

49. What’s cracking?

This slang phrase is used to ask about what is happening or what is new in someone’s life.

  • For instance, “Hey, what’s cracking with you?”
  • If you want to catch up with a friend, you might ask, “So, what’s cracking in your world?”
  • In a casual conversation, you could say, “Tell me, what’s cracking?”

50. How’s everything?

This phrase is used to inquire about how things are going in someone’s life or how they are doing in general.

  • For example, “Hey, how’s everything with you?”
  • If you want to check in on a friend, you might ask, “So, how’s everything been going for you lately?”
  • When catching up with someone, you could say, “Just wanted to see how everything is going for you.”

51. Good day

This phrase is used as a polite and formal way to say hello, often used in professional or formal settings.

  • For example, when entering a business meeting, one might say, “Good day, everyone.”
  • In a formal email, a person might begin with, “I hope this message finds you having a good day.”
  • A customer service representative might greet a customer with, “Good day, how may I assist you?”

52. Ni hao

This is the Mandarin Chinese phrase for hello, commonly used by Mandarin speakers around the world.

  • For instance, when meeting someone for the first time, one might say, “Ni hao, nice to meet you.”
  • In a Mandarin language class, the teacher might greet the students with, “Ni hao, class.”
  • A tourist visiting China might learn to say, “Ni hao, where is the nearest subway station?”

53. Guten Tag

This is the German phrase for hello, used by German speakers in various contexts.

  • For example, when entering a store in Germany, one might say, “Guten Tag, can you help me find this item?”
  • In a German language class, the teacher might begin with, “Guten Tag, students.”
  • A person visiting Germany might greet a local with, “Guten Tag, is there a good restaurant nearby?”

54. Selamat pagi

This is the Indonesian phrase for good morning, used by Indonesian speakers to greet each other in the morning.

  • For instance, when arriving at work, one might say, “Selamat pagi, everyone.”
  • In an Indonesian household, a parent might wake up their child by saying, “Selamat pagi, time to get ready for school.”
  • A person visiting Indonesia might greet a local with, “Selamat pagi, do you know where I can find a taxi?”

55. Hei

This is an informal way to say hello, often used in casual or friendly settings.

  • For example, when meeting a friend, one might say, “Hei, long time no see!”
  • In a group chat with close friends, someone might start the conversation with, “Hei, what’s everyone up to?”
  • A person passing by a neighbor might greet them with a quick “Hei” and a wave.