Top 20 Slang For A Thousand Dollars – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to money, there’s always a slang term or two to spice things up. From the streets to the boardrooms, slang for a thousand dollars has its own unique flavor. We’ve scoured the depths of the English language to bring you the most interesting and creative ways that people refer to this hefty sum. Get ready to learn some new lingo and maybe even impress your friends with your financial slang knowledge!

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1. Grand

In slang terms, “grand” is used to refer to one thousand dollars. It is believed to have originated from the use of “grand” to describe large sums of money in the early 1900s.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made a grand selling my old guitar.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, one might say, “I spent a grand on concert tickets.”
  • A person discussing savings might say, “I managed to save up five grand for my vacation.”

2. G

The letter “G” is often used as a shorthand way to represent “grand,” which means one thousand dollars. It is commonly used in informal contexts such as text messages or online chats.

  • For instance, someone might text, “I owe you 2G for the concert tickets.”
  • In a discussion about expenses, one might say, “I spent 3G on a new laptop.”
  • A person discussing a large purchase might say, “I just dropped 5G on a new TV.”

3. Stack

In slang terms, “stack” is used to refer to one thousand dollars. The term is derived from the visual representation of a stack of one hundred dollar bills, which adds up to one thousand dollars.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to save up another stack for my vacation.”
  • In a conversation about making money, one might say, “I just made a quick stack from my side hustle.”
  • A person discussing expenses might say, “I spent a stack on new clothes this month.”

4. Rack

In slang terms, “rack” is used to refer to one thousand dollars. The term is believed to have originated from the use of “rack” to describe a stack of money, similar to how “stack” is used.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just made a rack from selling my old video games.”
  • In a discussion about expenses, one might say, “I spent a rack on dinner at that fancy restaurant.”
  • A person discussing savings might say, “I managed to save up five racks for a down payment.”

5. K

In slang terms, “K” is used as a shorthand way to represent “thousand.” It is commonly used in informal contexts such as text messages or online chats.

  • For example, someone might text, “I just made 10K from my freelance work.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, one might say, “I spent 5K on a vacation.”
  • A person discussing savings might say, “I need to save up another 2K for a new car.”

6. Band

In slang, “band” is used as a shorthand for a thousand dollars. It is derived from the idea of a stack of hundred-dollar bills, which resembles a band.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made a band from selling my old clothes.”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, a person might mention, “That designer bag cost me a whole band.”
  • A rapper might boast, “I make bands every time I drop a new album.”

7. G-note

A “G-note” is another term used to refer to a thousand dollars. The “G” represents the Roman numeral for one thousand.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I owe you a G-note for that favor you did.”
  • In a conversation about saving money, a person might mention, “I managed to save up a few G-notes.”
  • A gambler might say, “I lost a couple of G-notes at the casino last night.”

8. Big one

The term “big one” is slang for a thousand dollars. It emphasizes the significant amount of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made a big one from my latest freelance project.”
  • In a conversation about financial goals, a person might mention, “I’m trying to save up for a big one.”
  • A person celebrating a financial milestone might say, “I finally hit my savings goal of a big one.”

9. Large

In slang, “large” is used to refer to a thousand dollars. It implies a significant amount of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just got paid a large for this month’s work.”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, a person might mention, “That luxury watch cost me a whole large.”
  • A person bragging about their financial success might say, “I’m sitting on a large right now.”

10. Grand slam

The term “grand slam” is slang for a thousand dollars. It is derived from the game of baseball, where a grand slam refers to a home run hit with all the bases loaded, resulting in four runs.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made a grand slam from my latest investment.”
  • In a conversation about financial achievements, a person might mention, “I hit a grand slam with that business deal.”
  • A person celebrating a financial windfall might say, “I just received a grand slam bonus at work.”

11. Big K

This term is derived from the letter “K” representing the abbreviation for “kilo,” which means thousand. It is used to refer to a large sum of money, specifically one thousand dollars.

  • For example, “He just dropped big K on a new gaming console.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might say, “I had to pay big K for car repairs.”
  • A person discussing a significant purchase might mention, “I saved up big K to buy my dream vacation package.”

12. Big band

This slang term refers to a thousand dollars. It is believed to have originated from the idea of a band, or stack, of one thousand-dollar bills.

  • For instance, “He made a big band from his successful business venture.”
  • In a discussion about expensive items, someone might say, “That luxury handbag costs a big band.”
  • A person talking about saving money might mention, “I managed to save up a big band for my emergency fund.”

13. Big G-note

This slang term is derived from the letter “G” representing the Roman numeral for one thousand. It is used to refer to a thousand dollars.

  • For example, “He just won a big G-note in the lottery.”
  • In a conversation about financial goals, someone might say, “I want to save at least a big G-note by the end of the year.”
  • A person discussing a significant expense might mention, “I had to pay a big G-note for my medical bills.”

14. Big grand

This slang term refers to a thousand dollars. It is derived from the word “grand,” which is often used to mean a thousand in various contexts, such as in music or sports.

  • For instance, “He spent a big grand on a new television.”
  • In a discussion about financial milestones, someone might say, “I just reached my savings goal of a big grand.”
  • A person talking about a large purchase might mention, “I had to fork over a big grand for that designer handbag.”

15. Big money

This term is used to refer to a large sum of money, specifically one thousand dollars. It emphasizes the significant amount of money being discussed.

  • For example, “He made big money from his successful business venture.”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, someone might say, “That luxury watch costs big money.”
  • A person discussing a financial windfall might mention, “I just received a bonus of big money from my employer.”

16. Big shot

This term refers to someone who is powerful, influential, or successful. It can also be used to describe someone who is arrogant or full of themselves.

  • For example, “He thinks he’s a big shot because he drives a fancy car.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “The CEO is a big shot in the industry.”
  • Another usage could be, “She’s a big shot lawyer with her own firm.”

17. Big spender

This slang term is used to describe someone who spends a lot of money, especially on luxury items or experiences. It can also be used sarcastically to imply that someone is wasteful with their money.

  • For instance, “He’s always buying expensive clothes and eating at fancy restaurants. He’s a big spender.”
  • In a conversation about shopping habits, someone might say, “I used to be a big spender, but now I’m trying to save more.”
  • Another example could be, “She’s known for being a big spender when she goes on vacation.”

18. Bigwig

This term is used to describe someone who holds a high-ranking or influential position, especially in a particular organization or industry. It is often used in a slightly sarcastic or mocking tone.

  • For example, “The bigwigs in the company made all the decisions without consulting the employees.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “The bigwigs in Washington don’t understand the struggles of everyday Americans.”
  • Another usage could be, “He’s a bigwig in the tech industry and has made a fortune.”

19. Big time

This slang term is used to describe something or someone that is considered significant, important, or successful. It can also be used to emphasize the magnitude or extent of something.

  • For instance, “He’s a big time movie producer who has won multiple awards.”
  • In a conversation about accomplishments, someone might say, “She made it to the big time with her latest album.”
  • Another example could be, “We’re going to have to prepare big time for this upcoming event.”

20. Big wig

This term is similar to “big shot” and “bigwig” in that it refers to someone who holds a high-ranking or influential position. It is often used in a slightly derogatory or mocking manner.

  • For example, “The big wigs in the company never listen to the ideas of the lower-level employees.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “The big wigs in Washington are out of touch with the needs of the people.”
  • Another usage could be, “He’s a big wig in the fashion industry and is always attending glamorous events.”
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