Top 36 Slang For Liking Someone – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing our feelings for someone special, sometimes words alone just don’t cut it. That’s where slang for liking someone comes in. We’ve scoured the depths of modern language to bring you a list of the most creative, fun, and endearing expressions used to describe that butterflies-in-your-stomach feeling. Whether you’re looking to impress your crush or simply want to stay up-to-date with the latest lingo, this article has got you covered. Get ready to dive into a world of affectionate slang that will have you swooning in no time!

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1. Crush

To have a crush on someone means to have strong feelings of romantic or sexual attraction towards them. It is often used to describe a one-sided infatuation or admiration for someone.

  • For example, “I have a crush on my coworker, but I’m too shy to tell them.”
  • A teenager might say, “I’ve had a crush on this guy in my math class for months.”
  • Someone might confess, “I can’t stop thinking about my crush, they’re always on my mind.”

2. Smitten

To be smitten with someone means to be deeply infatuated or captivated by them. It describes a strong and often sudden feeling of attraction or love.

  • For instance, “I’m completely smitten with my new partner, they make me feel so happy.”
  • A friend might say, “She’s been smitten with him ever since they met.”
  • Someone might gush, “I’m absolutely smitten with her smile, it’s so contagious.”

3. Dig

To dig someone means to really like them or have a strong interest in them. It can be used to express attraction or admiration.

  • For example, “I really dig this person’s sense of humor, we always have a great time together.”
  • A friend might say, “I can tell you dig him, the way you talk about him is so enthusiastic.”
  • Someone might confess, “I’ve been digging this person for a while now, I hope they feel the same way.”

4. Swept off my feet

To be swept off your feet means to be overwhelmed by feelings of love or infatuation. It describes a situation where someone’s emotions are so intense that they feel like they are being carried away.

  • For instance, “He completely swept me off my feet with his romantic gestures.”
  • A friend might say, “She was swept off her feet when he surprised her with a weekend getaway.”
  • Someone might gush, “I felt like I was being swept off my feet when they kissed me, it was so magical.”

To be head over heels means to be falling deeply and passionately in love with someone. It describes a state of being completely infatuated and consumed by feelings of love.

  • For example, “I’m head over heels for this person, they make me feel like I’m walking on air.”
  • A friend might say, “She’s head over heels in love with him, it’s adorable to see.”
  • Someone might confess, “I’ve fallen head over heels for them, I can’t imagine my life without them.”

6. Into

When someone is “into” someone else, it means they are interested in that person romantically or sexually.

  • For example, “I think he’s into her, they’ve been spending a lot of time together.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you into him? Should I set you guys up?”
  • Someone might confess, “I’m really into her, but I don’t know if she feels the same way.”

7. Infatuated

Being “infatuated” with someone means having an intense but short-lived passion or admiration for them.

  • For instance, “He’s completely infatuated with her, he can’t stop talking about her.”
  • A person might say, “I was infatuated with him in high school, but it was just a crush.”
  • Someone might admit, “I know it’s just infatuation, but I can’t help how I feel.”

8. Crushing

When someone has a “crush” on someone else, it means they have strong feelings of attraction or infatuation towards that person.

  • For example, “I have a huge crush on him, but I’m too nervous to talk to him.”
  • A friend might tease, “Who’s your latest crush? Spill the details!”
  • Someone might confess, “I’ve had a crush on her for years, but I’ve never told her.”

9. Fancy

When someone “fancies” someone else, it means they have a liking or attraction towards that person.

  • For instance, “I fancy him, he’s got a great sense of humor.”
  • A person might say, “I think she fancies you, she’s always looking in your direction.”
  • Someone might admit, “I fancy her, but I don’t know if she feels the same way.”

10. Sweet on

Being “sweet on” someone means having strong feelings of affection or fondness for that person.

  • For example, “He’s sweet on her, he buys her flowers every week.”
  • A friend might say, “I can tell you’re sweet on him, you’re always blushing around him.”
  • Someone might confess, “I’m really sweet on her, she’s always on my mind.”

11. Taken with

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is very interested in or attracted to another person. It implies that the person is captivated or infatuated with the other person.

  • For example, “She’s really taken with him. She can’t stop talking about him.”
  • In a conversation about a crush, someone might say, “I’m really taken with this guy I met at the party.”
  • A friend might ask, “Have you seen how taken with her he is? He can’t take his eyes off her.”

12. Falling for

This phrase is used to describe the process of developing romantic feelings for someone. It implies that the person is starting to fall in love or become emotionally invested in the other person.

  • For instance, “I think I’m falling for him. He’s always on my mind.”
  • In a conversation with a friend, someone might say, “I can’t help it, I’m falling for her. She’s amazing.”
  • A person might confess, “I didn’t expect it, but I’m falling for this person I’ve been seeing.”

13. Love-struck

This term describes the state of being completely infatuated or smitten with someone. It implies that the person is deeply in love and often unable to think clearly or focus on anything else.

  • For example, “Ever since they started dating, he’s been love-struck. He can’t stop talking about her.”
  • A person might say, “I’m completely love-struck by this amazing person I met.”
  • In a conversation about a crush, someone might say, “She’s so love-struck, she can’t stop blushing whenever he’s around.”

14. Adore

This word is used to express a deep affection or love for someone. It implies that the person has strong feelings of admiration and fondness for the other person.

  • For instance, “I absolutely adore him. He’s the most amazing person I’ve ever met.”
  • In a conversation with a friend, someone might say, “I adore her. She’s so kind and caring.”
  • A person might confess, “I can’t help it, I adore this person I’ve been getting to know.”

15. Smitten kitten

This phrase is a playful way to describe being completely infatuated or smitten with someone. It implies that the person is head over heels in love and often unable to contain their excitement or affection.

  • For example, “Ever since they started dating, he’s been a smitten kitten. He can’t stop smiling.”
  • A person might say, “I’m a smitten kitten whenever I’m around this person I like.”
  • In a conversation about a crush, someone might say, “She’s a smitten kitten. She can’t stop gushing about him.”

16. Have a thing for

This phrase is used to describe when someone has a particular interest or liking for someone else. It implies a deeper level of attraction or infatuation.

  • For example, “I have a thing for guys with tattoos.”
  • Someone might say, “She has a thing for older men.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have a thing for him? You’re always talking about him.”

17. Crushing hard

This phrase is used to describe when someone has a deep and intense romantic attraction towards someone else. It implies a strong desire and infatuation.

  • For instance, “I’m crushing hard on my co-worker.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been crushing hard on him for months.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you still crushing hard on that guy from the party?”

18. Heart eyes

This phrase is used to describe when someone is completely infatuated or enamored with someone else. It implies a strong attraction and admiration.

  • For example, “Whenever I see him, I get heart eyes.”
  • Someone might say, “She’s got heart eyes for that celebrity.”
  • A friend might comment, “You can’t hide your heart eyes whenever he’s around.”

19. Sweating someone

This phrase is used to describe when someone is strongly attracted or interested in someone else. It implies a sense of nervousness and anticipation.

  • For instance, “I’m totally sweating him, I can’t stop thinking about him.”
  • A person might say, “She’s been sweating that guy since they met.”
  • A friend might tease, “You’re sweating him so hard, it’s obvious!”

20. Feeling butterflies

This phrase is used to describe the feeling of excitement, nervousness, or anticipation that one experiences when thinking about someone they are attracted to. It implies a sense of butterflies in the stomach.

  • For example, “Every time I see him, I get butterflies.”
  • Someone might say, “I’ve been feeling butterflies whenever he texts me.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you still get butterflies when you see her?”

21. Lovey-dovey

This term is used to describe a couple who are very affectionate or romantic towards each other. It often implies a sense of being overly lovey or mushy.

  • For example, “They’re always holding hands and whispering sweet nothings to each other. They’re so lovey-dovey.”
  • A friend might say, “Whenever they’re together, they’re in their own little lovey-dovey world.”
  • Someone might comment, “I can’t handle all the lovey-dovey stuff. It’s too much for me.”

22. Taken a shine to

This phrase is used to express that someone has developed a liking or attraction towards another person. It suggests that the person has taken notice of someone and is interested in getting to know them better.

  • For instance, “Ever since they met, he’s really taken a shine to her.”
  • A friend might say, “I think she’s taken a shine to that new guy in her class.”
  • Someone might ask, “Have you taken a shine to anyone at the party?”

23. Thirsty

This slang term is used to describe someone who is desperate or overly eager for attention or affection from someone they are interested in. It implies a sense of desperation or neediness.

  • For example, “He’s always commenting on her posts and trying to get her attention. He’s so thirsty.”
  • A friend might say, “She’s been texting him non-stop. She’s so thirsty for his attention.”
  • Someone might comment, “I can’t stand when people act all thirsty. It’s so unattractive.”

24. Puppy love

This term is used to describe a temporary and often immature form of love or infatuation, typically experienced by young people. It suggests a sense of innocence and naivety in the feelings.

  • For instance, “They’re just kids, it’s just puppy love.”
  • A friend might say, “I remember my first crush in middle school. It was all puppy love.”
  • Someone might comment, “Puppy love can be cute, but it rarely lasts.”

25. Twitterpated

This word is used to describe a state of being infatuated or excited about someone, often to the point of being distracted or unable to focus on anything else. It is a playful and lighthearted term.

  • For example, “Ever since they started dating, she’s been completely twitterpated.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ve never seen her so twitterpated before. She’s head over heels.”
  • Someone might comment, “Being twitterpated can be fun, but don’t forget to stay grounded.”

26. Have the hots for

This phrase is used to describe a strong physical or romantic attraction towards someone.

  • For example, “I have the hots for my coworker, they’re so attractive.”
  • In a conversation about crushes, someone might say, “I’ve had the hots for them since high school.”
  • A friend might ask, “Have you ever had the hots for someone you couldn’t have?”

27. Swept away

To be “swept away” means to be completely captivated or overwhelmed by feelings of attraction or love towards someone.

  • For instance, “I was swept away by their charm and couldn’t resist falling for them.”
  • In a romantic comedy, a character might say, “I was swept away by their grand romantic gesture.”
  • A friend might ask, “Have you ever been swept away by someone you just met?”

28. Have a soft spot for

Having a “soft spot” for someone means to have a special fondness or affection for them.

  • For example, “I have a soft spot for people who are kind to animals.”
  • In a conversation about preferences, someone might say, “I have a soft spot for musicians.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have a soft spot for someone you’ve known for a long time?”

29. Love-stricken

Being “love-stricken” means to be deeply and intensely in love with someone.

  • For instance, “I became love-stricken the moment I saw them.”
  • In a romantic novel, a character might say, “She was love-stricken and couldn’t imagine her life without him.”
  • A friend might ask, “Have you ever been love-stricken by someone who didn’t feel the same way?”

30. Taken a liking to

To “take a liking to” someone means to develop a strong interest or attraction towards them.

  • For example, “I’ve taken a liking to my new neighbor, they’re really fun to be around.”
  • In a conversation about hobbies, someone might say, “I’ve taken a liking to painting recently.”
  • A friend might ask, “Have you ever taken a liking to someone you initially didn’t like?”

31. Catching feelings

– For example, “I’ve been catching feelings for my best friend lately.”

  • A person might say, “I didn’t expect to start catching feelings for him, but it happened.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might mention, “Catching feelings can be both exciting and scary at the same time.”

32. Butterflies in my stomach

– For instance, “Every time I see her, I get butterflies in my stomach.”

  • A person might say, “I had butterflies in my stomach before our first date.”
  • When discussing a crush, someone might ask, “Do you get butterflies in your stomach when you’re around them?”

33. Crushing on

– For example, “I’ve been crushing on him since we first met.”

  • A person might say, “I can’t help but have a crush on her.”
  • When discussing attraction, someone might mention, “I think I’m crushing on my coworker.”

34. Enamored

– For instance, “I’m completely enamored with her, she’s amazing.”

  • A person might say, “I’ve never felt so enamored in my life.”
  • When talking about a celebrity crush, someone might say, “I’ve been enamored with them since I was a teenager.”

35. Fond of

– For example, “I’m really fond of my coworker, we get along so well.”

  • A person might say, “I’ve always been fond of him, he’s such a great person.”
  • When discussing friendships turning into something more, someone might mention, “I started off just being fond of her, but now I think I’m developing stronger feelings.”

36. Into someone

When someone is “into” someone else, it means they have romantic feelings or attraction towards that person. It implies a desire to pursue a romantic relationship.

  • For example, “I think I’m into someone from my class, but I’m not sure if they feel the same way.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been into her for months now, but I haven’t had the courage to ask her out.”
  • Someone might ask their friend, “Have you ever been into someone who didn’t feel the same?”
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