Top 37 Slang For Addict – Meaning & Usage

Being up to date with the latest slang is essential, especially when it comes to understanding the language used by different communities. And when it comes to the world of addiction, there is a unique set of terms that are used to describe various aspects of this complex issue. In this article, we’ve gathered the top slang words and phrases commonly used by addicts, providing you with an insightful and comprehensive guide to better understand their experiences and challenges. From “junkie” to “chasing the dragon,” we’ve got you covered. So, let’s dive in and expand our knowledge together!

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1. Junkie

This term is often used to refer to someone who is addicted to drugs, particularly illegal substances. It carries a negative connotation and can be derogatory.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been a junkie for years, unable to kick his heroin addiction.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid crisis, someone might comment, “We need better resources to help these junkies get clean.”
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “I used to be a junkie, but I’ve been in recovery for five years now.”

2. Fiend

This term is used to describe someone who is intensely craving drugs or has a strong desire to use them. It implies a lack of control over their addiction.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s such a fiend for cocaine, he’ll do anything to get his next fix.”
  • In a conversation about substance abuse, someone might comment, “It’s heartbreaking to see someone you love turn into a fiend.”
  • A person in recovery might reflect, “I used to be a fiend, but now I’m focused on rebuilding my life.”

3. User

This term is a general way to refer to someone who consumes drugs, whether recreationally or habitually. It does not necessarily imply addiction.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s a casual user, only using drugs on weekends.”
  • In a discussion about drug policy, someone might comment, “We need to focus on harm reduction for all users, not just addicts.”
  • A person sharing their experiences might say, “I used to be a heavy user, but I’ve since cut back and am in a better place now.”

4. Tweaker

This term specifically refers to someone who is addicted to methamphetamine, a highly addictive stimulant drug. It is often used to describe individuals who display erratic behavior or are hyperactive due to meth use.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Stay away from that guy, he’s a tweaker and can be dangerous.”
  • In a conversation about the impact of meth on communities, someone might comment, “The presence of tweakers has led to an increase in property crime.”
  • A person in recovery might reflect, “I used to be a tweaker, but I’ve been clean for three years now.”

5. Pillhead

This term is used to describe someone who is addicted to prescription drugs, particularly painkillers or opioids. It highlights their reliance on pills to cope with physical or emotional pain.

  • For example, someone might say, “She’s a pillhead, constantly seeking out doctors to get more prescriptions.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid epidemic, someone might comment, “We need better education and resources to help pillheads recover.”
  • A person sharing their journey might say, “I used to be a pillhead, but I’ve found healthier ways to manage my pain and emotions.”

6. Dope fiend

This term is used to describe someone who is addicted to drugs, particularly illegal substances like heroin or cocaine. It carries a negative connotation and is often used to emphasize the destructive nature of addiction.

  • For example, “He used to be a successful businessman, but now he’s just a dope fiend.”
  • In a conversation about the opioid crisis, someone might say, “We need to help these dope fiends get the treatment they need.”
  • A news article about drug addiction might refer to “the struggles of dope fiends in urban areas.”

7. Speed freak

This term refers to someone who is addicted to amphetamines, which are stimulant drugs that increase energy and alertness. “Speed freak” is often used to describe individuals who abuse drugs like methamphetamine or prescription stimulants.

  • For instance, “He used to be a straight-A student, but now he’s just a speed freak.”
  • In a conversation about the dangers of methamphetamine, someone might say, “Speed freaks often experience severe physical and mental health problems.”
  • A rehabilitation center might offer programs specifically designed for speed freaks.

8. Crackhead

This slang term is used to describe someone who is addicted to crack cocaine, a highly addictive form of cocaine that is smoked. It is a derogatory term that stigmatizes individuals struggling with addiction.

  • For example, “She used to be a talented artist, but now she’s just a crackhead.”
  • In a conversation about the impact of crack cocaine on communities, someone might say, “Crackheads often resort to crime to support their addiction.”
  • A documentary about drug addiction might feature interviews with former crackheads who have turned their lives around.

9. Stoner

This term is used to describe someone who is addicted to marijuana, a psychoactive drug derived from the cannabis plant. “Stoner” is often used in a more lighthearted or casual manner compared to other slang terms for addicts.

  • For instance, “He’s always high. He’s such a stoner.”
  • In a conversation about the legalization of marijuana, someone might say, “Not all stoners are lazy and unmotivated.”
  • A comedy movie might feature a character who is a lovable stoner.
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10. Alkie

This slang term is used to describe someone who is addicted to alcohol. It is a shortened form of “alcoholic” and is often used informally or among friends.

  • For example, “He’s been drinking every day for years. He’s definitely an alkie.”
  • In a conversation about the impact of alcoholism on relationships, someone might say, “Living with an alkie can be incredibly challenging.”
  • A support group for family members of alkies might offer resources and counseling services.

11. Smackhead

This term is slang for a person who is addicted to heroin. It is derived from the word “smack,” which is another term for heroin.

  • For example, “He used to be such a talented musician, but now he’s just a smackhead.”
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, someone might say, “Smackheads face numerous health risks due to their heroin use.”
  • A news article might discuss the impact of heroin addiction by stating, “The number of smackheads in the city has been steadily increasing.”

12. Coke fiend

This phrase refers to someone who is addicted to cocaine. The term “fiend” implies a strong and uncontrollable desire for the drug.

  • For instance, “He’s always looking for his next fix. He’s a real coke fiend.”
  • In a discussion about substance abuse, someone might say, “Coke fiends often experience severe mood swings and paranoia.”
  • A rehab counselor might talk about the challenges of helping coke fiends overcome their addiction.

13. Meth head

This slang term is used to describe someone who is addicted to methamphetamine, commonly known as meth. The term “head” refers to a person who habitually uses a specific drug.

  • For example, “She used to be a successful lawyer, but now she’s just a meth head.”
  • In a conversation about the dangers of drug abuse, someone might mention, “Meth heads often experience rapid weight loss and dental problems.”
  • A documentary might explore the lives of meth heads and the impact of their addiction on their families.

14. Boozer

This term is slang for a person who is addicted to alcohol. It is often used to describe someone who frequently drinks to excess.

  • For instance, “He’s been a boozer for years. It’s really affecting his health.”
  • In a discussion about alcoholism, someone might say, “Boozers often struggle with maintaining relationships and holding down a job.”
  • A support group for alcoholics might use the term “boozer” to create a sense of camaraderie among its members.

15. Junky

This term is a slang synonym for a person who is addicted to drugs in general. It can refer to individuals addicted to various substances, such as heroin, cocaine, or methamphetamine.

  • For example, “He’s been a junky for years, trying to kick his addiction.”
  • In a conversation about the opioid crisis, someone might mention, “Junkies often resort to desperate measures to obtain their next fix.”
  • A news article might discuss the challenges faced by junkies in accessing proper healthcare and rehabilitation services.

16. Hophead

This term refers to someone who is addicted to drugs, particularly opioids or heroin. It is derived from the slang term “hop” which is a euphemism for opium or heroin.

  • For example, “He used to be a successful businessman, but now he’s just a hophead.”
  • In a conversation about addiction, someone might say, “It’s heartbreaking to see how many hopheads are struggling.”
  • A news article might discuss the rise in hophead-related crimes, stating, “The city is grappling with an increase in thefts committed by desperate hopheads.”

17. Acidhead

This term refers to someone who is addicted to LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide), a powerful hallucinogenic drug. It is a combination of “acid,” which is a common nickname for LSD, and “head,” which is a slang term for a drug user.

  • For instance, “He was known as an acidhead back in the 60s.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of drug use, someone might say, “Becoming an acidhead can have serious long-term effects on your mental health.”
  • A documentary about psychedelic culture might feature interviews with former acidheads who share their experiences with the drug.

18. Snowbird

This term refers to someone who is addicted to cocaine. It is derived from the slang term “snow,” which is a common nickname for cocaine, and “bird,” which is a slang term for a person.

  • For example, “He used to be a successful lawyer, but now he’s just a snowbird.”
  • In a conversation about substance abuse, someone might say, “Cocaine is a highly addictive drug, and many snowbirds struggle to quit.”
  • A news article might discuss the rise in snowbird-related crimes, stating, “Law enforcement is cracking down on drug dealers who prey on vulnerable snowbirds.”

19. Crack fiend

This term refers to someone who is addicted to crack cocaine, a highly addictive form of cocaine that is smoked. “Fiend” is a slang term for someone who is extremely addicted to a drug and will do anything to obtain it.

  • For instance, “He’s a crack fiend, always looking for his next hit.”
  • In a discussion about the devastating effects of crack cocaine, someone might say, “Crack fiends often suffer from severe health issues and financial ruin.”
  • A documentary about the crack epidemic might feature interviews with former crack fiends who share their experiences with addiction and recovery.
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20. Smack junkie

This term refers to someone who is addicted to heroin, a highly addictive opioid drug. “Smack” is a slang term for heroin, and “junkie” is a derogatory term for a drug addict.

  • For example, “He used to be a talented musician, but now he’s just a smack junkie.”
  • In a conversation about the opioid crisis, someone might say, “Smack junkies often struggle to break free from the grip of addiction.”
  • A news article might discuss the rise in overdose deaths among smack junkies, stating, “The city is facing a devastating heroin epidemic that is claiming the lives of countless individuals.”

21. Speedster

This term is often used to refer to someone who regularly uses amphetamines, such as methamphetamine or Adderall. The term “speedster” comes from the stimulant effects of these drugs, which can increase energy and alertness.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s a known speedster, always on the go.”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, a person might mention, “Speedsters often experience a crash after the effects wear off.”
  • A recovering addict might share their experience, saying, “I used to be a speedster, but I’ve been clean for two years now.”

22. Druggie

A derogatory term used to describe someone who is addicted to drugs, regardless of the specific substance. “Druggie” is often used in a negative or judgmental way to imply a lack of control or moral character.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Stay away from him, he’s a druggie.”
  • In a conversation about addiction, a person might discuss the challenges faced by druggies, saying, “Many druggies struggle to break free from the cycle of substance abuse.”
  • A recovering addict might share their story, saying, “I used to be a druggie, but I’ve turned my life around.”

23. Cokehead

This term is used to describe someone who is addicted to cocaine, a powerful stimulant drug. “Cokehead” is a slang term that is often used to emphasize the severity of the addiction and the negative consequences associated with cocaine abuse.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s a cokehead, always chasing the next high.”
  • In a discussion about drug rehabilitation, a person might mention the challenges faced by cokeheads, saying, “Cocaine addiction can be particularly difficult to overcome.”
  • A recovering addict might share their experience, saying, “I used to be a cokehead, but I’ve been clean for five years now.”

24. Pothead

This term refers to someone who regularly uses marijuana. “Pothead” is often used in a casual or lighthearted way to describe someone who enjoys smoking or consuming cannabis.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s a pothead, always lighting up.”
  • In a conversation about drug policy, a person might discuss the stigma faced by potheads, saying, “Society is starting to recognize that not all potheads are lazy or unmotivated.”
  • A marijuana enthusiast might proudly identify as a pothead, saying, “I’m a pothead and I’m proud of it.”

25. Trasher

This term is used to describe someone who is addicted to heroin, a highly addictive and dangerous opioid drug. “Trasher” is a slang term that is often used to convey the destructive nature of heroin addiction and the toll it takes on a person’s life.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s a known trasher, always looking for their next fix.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid epidemic, a person might mention the devastating impact on trashers and their families, saying, “We need to provide more resources for trashers to get help.”
  • A recovering addict might share their story, saying, “I used to be a trasher, but I’ve been clean for three years now.”

26. Smack fiend

This term is slang for someone who is addicted to heroin. “Smack” is a colloquial term for heroin, and “fiend” implies a strong craving or obsession.

  • For example, “He’s a smack fiend, always looking for his next fix.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, someone might say, “It’s important to provide support and resources for smack fiends seeking recovery.”
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “I used to be a smack fiend, but I’ve been clean for three years now.”

27. Drunkard

This term refers to someone who is addicted to alcohol and frequently drinks to excess. “Drunkard” carries a negative connotation and often implies a lack of control.

  • For instance, “He’s a notorious drunkard, always stumbling out of bars.”
  • In a conversation about alcoholism, someone might say, “It’s important to recognize that a drunkard needs professional help to overcome their addiction.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I used to be a drunkard, but I’ve been sober for five years now.”

28. Gambler

This term refers to someone who is addicted to gambling and has a strong compulsion to continue gambling despite negative consequences. “Gambler” is a more general term, while “compulsive gambler” emphasizes the addictive nature of the behavior.

  • For example, “He’s a compulsive gambler, always chasing the next big win.”
  • In a discussion about gambling addiction, someone might say, “It’s important to provide support and resources for compulsive gamblers seeking help.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I used to be a compulsive gambler, but I’ve been in recovery for two years now.”

29. Workaholic

This term refers to someone who is addicted to work and has an obsessive need to constantly work, often at the expense of other areas of life. “Workaholic” is a colloquial term that combines “work” and “alcoholic” to convey the addictive nature of the behavior.

  • For instance, “She’s a workaholic, always staying late at the office.”
  • In a conversation about work-life balance, someone might say, “It’s important to recognize the signs of a work addict and encourage them to take breaks.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I used to be a workaholic, but I’ve learned to prioritize my well-being and personal life.”

30. Shopaholic

This term refers to someone who is addicted to shopping and has an irresistible urge to constantly buy things, often leading to financial problems. “Shopaholic” is a colloquial term that combines “shop” and “alcoholic” to convey the addictive nature of the behavior.

  • For example, “She’s a shopaholic, always maxing out her credit cards.”
  • In a discussion about compulsive buying, someone might say, “It’s important to provide support and resources for shopaholics seeking to overcome their addiction.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I used to be a shopaholic, but I’ve learned to manage my impulses and prioritize saving.”

31. Chocoholic

A chocoholic is a person who has a strong craving or addiction for chocolate. It is often used humorously to describe someone who consumes chocolate in large quantities or frequently.

  • For example, “I’m a total chocoholic. I can’t go a day without eating chocolate.”
  • A person might jokingly say, “I’m not an addict, I’m a chocoholic!”
  • Someone might confess, “I know it’s bad for me, but I can’t resist. I’m a chocoholic.”

32. Internet addict

An internet addict is a person who has a compulsive need to spend excessive amounts of time online. It is often used to describe someone who prioritizes their online activities over other aspects of their life.

  • For instance, “I spend so much time online, I think I’m becoming an internet addict.”
  • A person might admit, “I can’t go a day without checking social media. I might be an internet addict.”
  • Someone might say, “I know I should be doing other things, but I can’t help it. I’m addicted to the internet.”

33. Video game addict

A video game addict is a person who has a compulsive need to play video games, often to the detriment of other responsibilities or activities. It is often used to describe someone who spends excessive amounts of time playing video games.

  • For example, “I skipped class today because I was playing video games all night. I think I’m becoming a video game addict.”
  • A person might confess, “I can’t stop playing. I might be a video game addict.”
  • Someone might say, “I know I should be doing other things, but I can’t tear myself away from my video games. I’m addicted.”

34. Adrenaline junkie

An adrenaline junkie is a person who constantly seeks out activities or experiences that provide an adrenaline rush. It is often used to describe someone who enjoys extreme sports, dangerous situations, or thrilling experiences.

  • For instance, “I love skydiving, bungee jumping, and anything that gets my heart racing. I’m an adrenaline junkie.”
  • A person might proudly say, “I live for the thrill. I’m an adrenaline junkie.”
  • Someone might confess, “I know it’s risky, but I can’t resist the adrenaline rush. I’m an adrenaline junkie.”

35. Nicotine fiend

A nicotine fiend is a person who has a strong craving or addiction for nicotine, often in the form of cigarettes or other tobacco products. It is often used humorously to describe someone who is heavily dependent on nicotine.

  • For example, “I can’t go more than an hour without a cigarette. I’m a nicotine fiend.”
  • A person might jokingly say, “I’m not addicted, I’m just a nicotine fiend!”
  • Someone might confess, “I know it’s bad for me, but I can’t quit. I’m a nicotine fiend.”

36. Serial procrastinator

This term refers to someone who consistently puts off tasks or responsibilities, often to the point of causing negative consequences. A serial procrastinator is someone who habitually avoids doing what they need to do.

  • For example, “I’m such a serial procrastinator that I always wait until the last minute to start my assignments.”
  • In a discussion about time management, someone might say, “I used to be a serial procrastinator, but I’ve learned strategies to overcome it.”
  • A person might self-reflect and admit, “I need to break the cycle of being a serial procrastinator and start taking action.”

37. Selfie addict

This term refers to someone who is excessively and compulsively obsessed with taking selfies, often to the point of it interfering with their daily life. A selfie addict constantly feels the need to capture and share photos of themselves.

  • For instance, “She’s a selfie addict and can’t go a day without posting a new picture of herself.”
  • In a conversation about social media habits, someone might say, “I think I’m becoming a selfie addict. I can’t resist taking photos of myself all the time.”
  • A person might jokingly admit, “I need a support group for my selfie addiction. I can’t stop snapping pictures of myself.”