Top 58 Slang For Among Other Things – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to casual conversations and online interactions, staying up-to-date with the latest slang is key. “Among other things” is a phrase that pops up frequently, adding a touch of mystery and depth to discussions. Curious to learn more about how this expression is used in everyday language? Let us guide you through a fun and informative list of slang terms that include this intriguing phrase. Stay tuned and get ready to level up your slang game!

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1. AOT

This abbreviation is used to refer to additional items or topics that are not explicitly mentioned but are included in a list or discussion. It is often used to indicate that there are more things to consider or discuss.

  • For example, in a sentence like “I need to buy groceries, do laundry, and AOT,” AOT implies that there are other tasks or responsibilities that need to be done.
  • In a meeting agenda, there might be a section titled “AOT” to indicate that there are additional topics to be covered.
  • A user might comment on a post saying, “Great points! AOT, we should also consider the environmental impact.”

2. ETC

This Latin phrase is used to indicate that there are more things to add to a list or discussion. It is often used to avoid listing every single item or to indicate that the list is not exhaustive.

  • For instance, in a sentence like “I bought apples, bananas, oranges, etc.,” etc. implies that there are other fruits that were purchased.
  • In a conversation about favorite movies, someone might say, “I love action movies like Die Hard, The Avengers, etc.”
  • A user might comment on a post saying, “I’ve traveled to many countries in Europe – France, Italy, Spain, etc.”

3. YMMV

This phrase is used to indicate that the results, experiences, or opinions may differ from person to person. It acknowledges that individual circumstances can impact the outcome or perception of something.

  • For example, in a product review, someone might say, “I found this moisturizer to be very effective, but YMMV.”
  • In a discussion about a restaurant, someone might comment, “The service was excellent for me, but YMMV.”
  • A user might reply to a travel recommendation saying, “YMMV, but I had a terrible experience at that hotel.”

4. TBD

This abbreviation is used to indicate that something has not yet been decided or finalized. It implies that a decision or announcement will be made at a later time.

  • For instance, in an event schedule, a time slot might be labeled “TBD” to indicate that the specific activity is still being determined.
  • In a project plan, a task might be marked as “TBD” if the details or requirements are not yet known.
  • A user might comment on a post saying, “I’m interested in attending, but the location is still TBD.”

5. FYI

This abbreviation is used to provide information or share something with someone. It is often used to communicate a message or update that the recipient may find useful or interesting.

  • For example, in an email subject line, someone might write “FYI: Updated Meeting Time.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “FYI, the restaurant we wanted to go to is closed today.”
  • A user might reply to a comment saying, “FYI, there’s a typo in your post.”

6. BTW

A phrase used to introduce or add additional information or a side note to a conversation or statement. It is commonly used in informal communication.

  • For example, “BTW, I forgot to mention that the party starts at 8pm.”
  • In a text message, someone might say, “BTW, did you see the latest episode of that show?”
  • During a conversation, a person might say, “BTW, I heard they’re opening a new restaurant downtown.”

7. IMHO

This acronym is used to express a personal opinion. It is often used to soften the tone and show humility or modesty.

  • For instance, “IMHO, that movie was amazing and definitely worth watching.”
  • In a discussion about music, someone might say, “IMHO, this artist is the best in the industry.”
  • During a debate, a person might say, “IMHO, the government should prioritize education funding.”

8. TL;DR

This abbreviation is often used to summarize a lengthy piece of text or to express disinterest in reading a long explanation. It is commonly used in online forums and discussions.

  • For example, “TL;DR: The article talks about the benefits of exercising regularly.”
  • In a comment thread, someone might say, “TL;DR: Can you give a brief summary of your argument?”
  • When sharing a long article, a person might add, “TL;DR: This is a must-read for anyone interested in environmental issues.”

9. AFAIK

An acronym used to indicate that the following information is based on the speaker’s current knowledge or understanding, which may not be complete or entirely accurate.

  • For instance, “AFAIK, the event is still scheduled for next week.”
  • In a discussion about a recent news story, someone might say, “AFAIK, the investigation is still ongoing.”
  • When asked about a specific topic, a person might respond, “AFAIK, there haven’t been any major updates on that issue.”

10. IIRC

This abbreviation is used to indicate that the following statement is based on the speaker’s memory, which may not be entirely accurate or complete.

  • For example, “IIRC, we met at that coffee shop last year.”
  • In a conversation about a past event, someone might say, “IIRC, he arrived late to the party.”
  • When recalling a previous conversation, a person might add, “IIRC, she mentioned wanting to travel to Europe.”

11. SMH

This acronym is used to express disappointment, disbelief, or disapproval. It signifies that something is so ridiculous or absurd that it leaves the user shaking their head in disbelief.

  • For example, “SMH, I can’t believe she said that.”
  • A user might comment on a foolish mistake with, “SMH, how did they manage to mess that up?”
  • In response to a ridiculous statement, someone might simply reply, “SMH.”

12. TBH

This abbreviation is used to preface an honest opinion or statement. It is often used when someone wants to express their true thoughts or feelings.

  • For instance, “TBH, I didn’t really like the movie.”
  • A user might comment on a friend’s new outfit with, “TBH, it’s not really my style.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “TBH, I think both sides have valid points.”

13. IDK

This abbreviation is used to indicate that the user does not have the answer or is unsure about something. It is a quick and casual way to express uncertainty.

  • For example, “IDK, I haven’t heard anything about that.”
  • Someone might respond to a question with, “IDK, I’ll have to look it up.”
  • In a group chat, a user might ask, “IDK, what do you guys want to do tonight?”

14. TMI

This acronym is used to indicate that someone has shared an excessive or inappropriate amount of personal information. It is often used in response to someone oversharing.

  • For instance, “TMI, I did not need to know all those details.”
  • A user might comment on a friend’s graphic description with, “TMI, I didn’t need that mental image.”
  • In a conversation about a sensitive topic, someone might say, “TMI, let’s keep it PG.”

15. NSFW

This acronym is used to indicate that the content being shared is inappropriate or explicit and should not be viewed in a professional or public setting. It is often used as a warning.

  • For example, “NSFW, this video contains explicit content.”
  • A user might comment on a link with, “NSFW, don’t open this at work.”
  • In a discussion about internet etiquette, someone might remind others to mark NSFW content appropriately.
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16. NBD

This acronym is used to convey that something is not a significant or important matter. It is often used to downplay a situation or to show nonchalance.

  • For example, if someone apologizes for a small mistake, you might respond with “NBD, it happens.”
  • In a conversation about a minor inconvenience, someone might say, “It’s NBD, we can easily fix it.”
  • A person might use NBD to brush off a compliment, saying “Oh, it was just a lucky shot, NBD.”

17. BFF

A term used to describe a close and enduring friendship. BFFs are often considered as close as family and share a deep bond.

  • For instance, someone might introduce their best friend by saying, “This is my BFF, we’ve been inseparable since kindergarten.”
  • In a heartfelt message, someone might write, “Thank you for always being there for me, BFF.”
  • A person might use BFF to express their loyalty, saying “I’ll always have your back, BFF.”

18. DIY

This acronym is used to describe the practice of completing tasks or projects on your own, without professional help or assistance. It is often associated with home improvement or craft projects.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m going to DIY my Halloween costume this year.”
  • In a discussion about home repairs, a person might mention, “I prefer DIY projects because they save money.”
  • A person might use DIY to express their independence, saying “I love the satisfaction of DIY, it’s empowering.”

19. FOMO

This acronym is used to describe the anxiety or unease that arises from the fear of not being present or involved in an exciting or interesting event. It is often associated with social media and the pressure to participate in activities.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I didn’t go to the party because of FOMO, but I ended up having a great night at home.”
  • In a conversation about a popular event, a person might confess, “I didn’t want to miss out on the concert, so I bought tickets last minute.”
  • A person might use FOMO to explain their decision to attend multiple events, saying “I have serious FOMO, I can’t say no to any invitation.”

20. LMK

This acronym is used to request information or to ask someone to inform you about something. It is often used when making plans or seeking updates.

  • For example, someone might say, “LMK if you’re free this weekend, I’d love to hang out.”
  • In a discussion about a future event, a person might ask, “LMK if you need any help with the preparations.”
  • A person might use LMK to express their willingness to assist, saying “I’m here to support you, just LMK what you need.”

21. ROFL

This acronym is used to indicate that something is extremely funny. It is often used in online conversations and social media to express laughter.

  • For example, “That joke was so hilarious, I was ROFL!”
  • In response to a funny video, someone might comment, “ROFL, I can’t stop laughing!”
  • A user might say, “I just watched a comedy special and I was ROFL the whole time!”

22. TTYL

A common abbreviation used to indicate that the person will talk to the other person at a later time. It is often used in text messages or online chats.

  • For instance, “I have to go now, TTYL!”
  • When ending a phone conversation, someone might say, “I’ll see you tomorrow, TTYL!”
  • A person might send a text message saying, “I’m busy right now, TTYL!”

23. NVM

An abbreviation used to indicate that something previously mentioned should be disregarded or forgotten. It is often used in online conversations or text messages.

  • For example, “I thought I left my keys at home, but they were in my bag. NVM!”
  • If someone asks for clarification on a previous statement, a user might respond, “NVM, it’s not important.”
  • A person might say, “I was going to ask for your help, but NVM, I figured it out.”

24. ASAP

An acronym used to indicate that something needs to be done or completed without delay. It is often used in professional or urgent contexts.

  • For instance, “Please send me the report ASAP.”
  • When requesting assistance, someone might say, “I need your help with this project ASAP.”
  • A person might send an email saying, “Please review and provide feedback ASAP.”

25. LOL

An acronym used to indicate laughter or amusement. It is often used in online conversations and social media.

  • For example, “That joke was hilarious, LOL!”
  • In response to a funny meme, someone might comment, “LOL, I can’t stop laughing!”
  • A user might say, “I just watched a comedy show and I was LOL the whole time!”

26. OMG

This acronym is used to express surprise, shock, or excitement. It is often used in text messages or online conversations.

  • For example, “OMG, I can’t believe I won the lottery!”
  • A person might use OMG in response to a funny video or meme, saying, “OMG, that is hilarious!”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity sighting, someone might exclaim, “OMG, I saw Taylor Swift at the mall today!”

27. BRB

This abbreviation is used to let someone know that you will be temporarily leaving the conversation or activity, but will return shortly.

  • For instance, “BRB, I need to grab a drink from the kitchen.”
  • A person might use BRB in a group chat to inform others, saying, “BRB, I have to take a quick phone call.”
  • In an online gaming session, someone might say, “BRB, my pizza just arrived!”

28. GTG

This abbreviation is used to indicate that you have to leave or end the conversation.

  • For example, “GTG, it’s getting late and I have work early in the morning.”
  • A person might use GTG to inform others in a group chat, saying, “GTG, I have a meeting to attend.”
  • In a text message, someone might say, “GTG, my friend just arrived to pick me up.”

29. IRL

This abbreviation is used to distinguish between online or virtual interactions and real-life interactions.

  • For instance, “I met my online friend IRL and we had a great time.”
  • A person might use IRL to clarify in a text message, saying, “I can’t make it to the virtual meeting, but I’ll be there IRL.”
  • In a conversation about hobbies, someone might say, “I love playing video games online, but I also enjoy playing sports IRL.”

30. YOLO

This acronym is used to encourage taking risks or seizing opportunities because life is short.

  • For example, “I’m going skydiving tomorrow. YOLO!”
  • A person might use YOLO to justify indulging in a spontaneous adventure, saying, “I booked a last-minute trip to Paris. YOLO!”
  • In a conversation about trying new things, someone might say, “I decided to take up painting. YOLO!”

31. TGIF

An expression used to celebrate the end of the workweek and the upcoming weekend. It signifies the relief and excitement of having a break from work or school.

  • For example, on social media, someone might post, “TGIF! Can’t wait to relax and unwind this weekend.”
  • In a conversation with friends, someone might say, “I’m so glad it’s Friday. TGIF!”
  • A coworker might send an email saying, “Just a reminder that we have a team lunch today. TGIF!”

32. RIP

An acronym used to express condolences or to pay respects to someone who has passed away. It is often used in social media posts or messages.

  • For instance, in response to news of someone’s death, a person might comment, “RIP. They will be missed.”
  • When sharing a tribute to a celebrity who has died, someone might write, “RIP to a true legend.”
  • In a conversation about a deceased loved one, someone might say, “I still can’t believe they’re gone. RIP.”

33. TBA

An abbreviation used to indicate that information or details about a specific event or topic are not yet known or finalized. It is commonly used in schedules, agendas, or announcements.

  • For example, a conference organizer might list a session as “TBA” if the speaker has not been confirmed yet.
  • When discussing upcoming plans, someone might say, “We’re still waiting for the venue to be announced. It’s TBA.”
  • In a conversation about a movie release date, someone might mention, “The release date for that film is still TBA.”

34. RSVP

A French phrase that translates to “Please respond” in English. It is used to request a response from invited guests to confirm their attendance or non-attendance at an event.

  • For instance, on an invitation, there might be a line that says, “Please RSVP by May 1st.”
  • When discussing party planning, someone might say, “We need to know the final headcount, so please RSVP as soon as possible.”
  • In a conversation about wedding preparations, someone might ask, “Have you received many RSVPs yet?”

35. AMONGST

A less common variant of the word “among,” often used in formal or poetic contexts. It means being surrounded by or in the midst of a group or collection of things or people.

  • For example, in a literary analysis, someone might write, “The protagonist finds himself amongst a diverse cast of characters.”
  • When describing a crowded event, someone might say, “We were packed tightly amongst the crowd.”
  • In a conversation about a group project, someone might mention, “I’m looking forward to collaborating amongst my teammates.”

36. AMONG OTHERS

This phrase is used to indicate that there are additional things or people that are not explicitly mentioned. It suggests that there are more examples or options, but they are not being listed at that moment.

  • For example, “She enjoys reading books by Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, and among others.”
  • In a conversation about favorite movies, someone might say, “I love action movies like Die Hard, Lethal Weapon, and among others.”
  • A person discussing their hobbies might mention, “I enjoy painting, hiking, and among others.”

37. AMONGST OTHERS

Similar to “among others,” this phrase is used to indicate that there are additional things or people that are not explicitly mentioned. It suggests that there are more examples or options, but they are not being listed at that moment. “Amongst” is an alternative spelling of “among.”

  • For instance, “He has worked with actors like Tom Hanks, Brad Pitt, and amongst others.”
  • In a discussion about favorite foods, someone might say, “I enjoy Italian cuisine, Mexican food, and amongst others.”
  • A person talking about their travel experiences might mention, “I’ve been to Paris, Tokyo, and amongst others.”

38. AMONGST OTHER THINGS

This phrase is used to indicate that there are additional things or items that are not explicitly mentioned. It suggests that there are more examples or options, but they are not being listed at that moment. “Amongst” is an alternative spelling of “among.”

  • For example, “She enjoys hiking, swimming, and amongst other things.”
  • In a conversation about favorite books, someone might say, “I love fantasy novels like Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings, and amongst other things.”
  • A person discussing their skills might mention, “I can play the piano, guitar, and amongst other things.”

39. AMONGST OTHER STUFF

Similar to “amongst other things,” this phrase is used to indicate that there are additional things or items that are not explicitly mentioned. It suggests that there are more examples or options, but they are not being listed at that moment. “Amongst” is an alternative spelling of “among.”

  • For instance, “He enjoys playing soccer, basketball, and amongst other stuff.”
  • In a discussion about favorite movies, someone might say, “I love romantic comedies like When Harry Met Sally, Crazy Rich Asians, and amongst other stuff.”
  • A person talking about their hobbies might mention, “I enjoy painting, cooking, and amongst other stuff.”

40. AMONGST OTHER ITEMS

Similar to “amongst other things,” this phrase is used to indicate that there are additional things or items that are not explicitly mentioned. It suggests that there are more examples or options, but they are not being listed at that moment. “Amongst” is an alternative spelling of “among.”

  • For example, “She enjoys collecting stamps, coins, and amongst other items.”
  • In a conversation about favorite fashion accessories, someone might say, “I love wearing hats, scarves, and amongst other items.”
  • A person discussing their hobbies might mention, “I enjoy painting, knitting, and amongst other items.”

41. AMONGST OTHER OPTIONS

This phrase is used to indicate that there are multiple options or choices available, among which the speaker is referring to one specifically.

  • For example, “Amongst other options, I would recommend the blue shirt.”
  • In a discussion about travel destinations, someone might say, “Amongst other options, I’m considering visiting Paris.”
  • A person giving advice on meal ideas might suggest, “Amongst other options, you could try making a salad.”

42. AMONGST OTHER CHOICES

This phrase is used to imply that there are various choices or alternatives available, and the speaker is mentioning one specifically.

  • For instance, “Amongst other choices, I prefer the red dress.”
  • In a conversation about career paths, someone might say, “Amongst other choices, I’m considering becoming a teacher.”
  • A person discussing menu options might suggest, “Amongst other choices, you could order the salmon.”

43. AMONGST OTHER POSSIBILITIES

This phrase is used to suggest that there are multiple possibilities or potential options, and the speaker is highlighting one specifically.

  • For example, “Amongst other possibilities, we could go hiking.”
  • In a discussion about weekend plans, someone might say, “Amongst other possibilities, I’m thinking of going to the beach.”
  • A person brainstorming ideas for a project might suggest, “Amongst other possibilities, we could create a video.”

44. AMONGST OTHER ALTERNATIVES

This phrase is used to indicate that there are various alternatives or choices available, and the speaker is mentioning one specifically.

  • For instance, “Amongst other alternatives, we could take the train.”
  • In a conversation about transportation options, someone might say, “Amongst other alternatives, I’m considering biking.”
  • A person discussing housing options might suggest, “Amongst other alternatives, you could rent a studio apartment.”

45. AMONGST OTHER SOLUTIONS

This phrase is used to imply that there are multiple solutions or answers available, and the speaker is referring to one specifically.

  • For example, “Amongst other solutions, we could hire a professional.”
  • In a discussion about solving a problem, someone might say, “Amongst other solutions, I suggest using a different approach.”
  • A person giving advice on fixing a computer issue might suggest, “Amongst other solutions, you could try restarting the device.”

46. AMONGST OTHER RESOURCES

This phrase is used to indicate that something is included along with other resources. It implies that there are multiple resources being considered or used.

  • For example, “You can find information about the topic in the library, amongst other resources.”
  • In a discussion about research methods, someone might say, “I used interviews, surveys, and analysis of documents, amongst other resources.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Remember to cite your sources, including books, articles, and websites, amongst other resources.”

47. AMONGST OTHER CATEGORIES

This phrase is used to indicate that something is included along with other categories. It implies that there are multiple categories being considered or discussed.

  • For instance, “The product can be classified under electronics, fashion, and amongst other categories.”
  • In a brainstorming session, someone might suggest, “Let’s consider marketing our product to millennials, baby boomers, and amongst other categories.”
  • A blogger might write, “This recipe falls into the dessert category, but it can also fit amongst other categories like comfort food or holiday treats.”

48. AMONGST OTHER GROUPS

This phrase is used to indicate that something is included along with other groups. It implies that there are multiple groups being considered or referenced.

  • For example, “The study compared the results of the experiment amongst other groups.”
  • In a discussion about social dynamics, someone might say, “The organization aims to promote inclusivity amongst other groups.”
  • A manager might explain, “We have different teams working on different projects, but they also collaborate amongst other groups when necessary.”

49. AMONGST OTHER PEOPLE

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is included along with other people. It implies that there are multiple people being considered or mentioned.

  • For instance, “I had dinner with my family, friends, and amongst other people.”
  • In a conversation about a party, someone might ask, “Who was there amongst other people?”
  • A traveler might say, “I met locals, tourists, and amongst other people during my trip.”

50. AMONGST OTHER INDIVIDUALS

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is included along with other individuals. It implies that there are multiple individuals being considered or referred to.

  • For example, “The award was given to scientists, artists, and amongst other individuals.”
  • In a discussion about leadership, someone might mention, “The president worked closely with advisors, experts, and amongst other individuals.”
  • An organizer might say, “The event attracted entrepreneurs, professionals, and amongst other individuals.”

51. AMONGST OTHER ENTITIES

This phrase is used to indicate that there are other entities or things included in a particular situation or group. It implies that there are other important factors to consider.

  • For example, “The new policy will affect businesses, individuals, and amongst other entities, non-profit organizations.”
  • In a discussion about a complicated issue, someone might say, “We need to take into account the opinions of experts, stakeholders, and amongst other entities, the general public.”
  • A person explaining a decision might say, “We chose this option because it aligns with our values, goals, and amongst other entities, our long-term strategy.”

52. AMONGST OTHER THOUGHTS

This phrase is used to indicate that there are other thoughts or considerations in addition to the ones mentioned. It implies that there are other factors to take into account.

  • For instance, “When I think about my future, I have career goals, personal aspirations, and amongst other thoughts, the desire for a balanced lifestyle.”
  • In a discussion about a complex issue, someone might say, “We need to consider the economic impact, environmental consequences, and amongst other thoughts, the social implications.”
  • A person reflecting on a decision might say, “I chose this path because it aligned with my values, passions, and amongst other thoughts, my long-term happiness.”

53. AMONGST OTHER IDEAS

This phrase is used to indicate that there are other ideas or concepts included in a particular situation or discussion. It implies that there are other perspectives or possibilities to consider.

  • For example, “When brainstorming for the project, we came up with innovative solutions, creative approaches, and amongst other ideas, out-of-the-box thinking.”
  • In a debate about a controversial topic, someone might say, “We should explore different viewpoints, diverse opinions, and amongst other ideas, alternative solutions.”
  • A person explaining their decision might say, “I chose this option because it aligns with my values, goals, and amongst other ideas, my vision for the future.”

54. AMONGST OTHER CONCEPTS

This phrase is used to indicate that there are other concepts or principles that are relevant to a particular situation or topic. It implies that there are other important factors to consider.

  • For instance, “When studying physics, we learn about laws of motion, principles of energy, and amongst other concepts, the theory of relativity.”
  • In a discussion about a philosophical idea, someone might say, “We should explore different theories, philosophical frameworks, and amongst other concepts, ethical principles.”
  • A person explaining a decision might say, “I chose this approach because it aligns with my values, goals, and amongst other concepts, my understanding of human behavior.”

55. AMONGST OTHER NOTIONS

This phrase is used to indicate that there are other notions or beliefs that are relevant to a particular situation or topic. It implies that there are other perspectives or ideas to consider.

  • For example, “When discussing cultural diversity, we should consider different customs, traditional practices, and amongst other notions, the concept of cultural relativism.”
  • In a debate about a social issue, someone might say, “We need to listen to different voices, diverse experiences, and amongst other notions, marginalized perspectives.”
  • A person explaining their decision might say, “I chose this path because it aligns with my values, goals, and amongst other notions, my belief in equality.”

56. AMONGST OTHER BELIEFS

This phrase is used to indicate that there are other beliefs or perspectives that should be considered alongside the one being discussed.

  • For example, “Amongst other beliefs, some people think that astrology can predict the future.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “We should take into account amongst other beliefs before making a decision.”
  • Another usage could be, “Amongst other beliefs, there are those who believe in ghosts and spirits.”

57. AMONGST OTHER OPINIONS

This phrase is used to acknowledge that there are other opinions or viewpoints on a particular matter that should be taken into consideration.

  • For instance, “Amongst other opinions, some people believe that climate change is not caused by human activity.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “Amongst other opinions, there are those who argue for stricter gun control.”
  • Another usage could be, “Amongst other opinions, some people think that vaccinations are harmful.”

58. AMONGST OTHER VIEWS

This phrase is used to recognize that there are other perspectives or viewpoints on a given subject that should be acknowledged.

  • For example, “Amongst other views, some people believe that art should be subjective and open to interpretation.”
  • In a conversation about literature, someone might say, “Amongst other views, there are those who see the protagonist as an anti-hero.”
  • Another usage could be, “Amongst other views, some people argue that technology is detrimental to society.”