Top 57 Slang For Animosity – Meaning & Usage

Feeling some animosity towards a certain someone? Well, you’re not alone. In today’s fast-paced world, expressing emotions like animosity has its own set of slang terms that can be hard to keep up with. Lucky for you, our team at Fluentslang has put together a list of the top slang for animosity that will have you speaking like a pro in no time. Get ready to level up your vocab game and navigate those tense situations with ease.

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1. Beef

This term is often used to describe a heated argument or a long-standing feud between individuals or groups. It can also refer to a sense of tension or hostility.

  • For example, “There’s been beef between those two rappers for years.”
  • In a sports context, one might say, “The teams have a long history of beef.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a personal conflict, saying, “I have beef with my neighbor over a property dispute.”

2. Bad blood

This phrase refers to a long-standing hostility or resentment between individuals or groups. It implies a strong negative history or unresolved issues.

  • For instance, “There’s bad blood between those two families that goes back generations.”
  • In a workplace context, someone might say, “There’s been bad blood between those two colleagues ever since the promotion.”
  • A person might use this phrase to describe a personal feud, saying, “I have some bad blood with my ex-partner.”

3. Grudge

A grudge refers to a deep-seated feeling of resentment or ill will towards someone. It implies holding onto negative feelings or a desire for revenge.

  • For example, “He’s been holding a grudge against his former friend for years.”
  • In a social setting, someone might say, “I can tell she’s still holding a grudge from that argument.”
  • A person might use this term to describe their own feelings, saying, “I admit I have a grudge against my former boss for how they treated me.”

4. Rivalry

A rivalry is a competition or ongoing conflict between individuals, groups, or teams. It often involves a sense of competitiveness and a desire to outperform or outdo the other party.

  • For instance, “The rivalry between those two sports teams is legendary.”
  • In a business context, one might say, “There’s a fierce rivalry between those two companies in the market.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a personal competition, saying, “I have a friendly rivalry with my sibling over who can run faster.”

5. Enmity

Enmity refers to a state of intense hostility or hatred between individuals or groups. It implies a strong and lasting animosity that goes beyond a simple disagreement.

  • For example, “There’s always been enmity between those two political factions.”
  • In a historical context, someone might say, “The enmity between those two nations dates back centuries.”
  • A person might use this term to describe their own feelings, saying, “I feel a deep enmity towards the person who wronged me.”

6. Hatred

– “I have a deep hatred for people who mistreat animals.”

7. Spite

– “He canceled the party out of spite because he wasn’t invited to another event.”

8. Resentment

– “She held onto her resentment towards her ex-husband for years.”

9. Antipathy

– “She felt an immediate antipathy towards her new neighbor.”

10. Discord

– “The political discord in the country led to protests and demonstrations.”

11. Bitterness

A feeling of anger, disappointment, or unhappiness towards someone or something.

  • For example, “There is a lot of bitterness between the two rival teams.”
  • A person might say, “I sense bitterness in her voice when she talks about her ex.”
  • In a discussion about a failed business partnership, someone might comment, “The bitterness between them is palpable.”

12. Disdain

A feeling of strong dislike or disapproval towards someone or something, often accompanied by a sense of superiority.

  • For instance, “She looked at him with disdain, as if he were beneath her.”
  • A person might say, “I have nothing but disdain for people who don’t follow the rules.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial public figure, someone might express, “I can’t stand him. He fills me with disdain.”

13. Malice

The intention or desire to do harm or cause suffering to someone.

  • For example, “He acted with malice towards his former friend.”
  • A person might say, “I can sense the malice in her words.”
  • In a discussion about a crime, someone might comment, “The act was committed with malice aforethought.”

14. Animus

A strong feeling of hostility or ill will towards someone or something.

  • For instance, “There is a deep animus between the two political parties.”
  • A person might say, “I can feel the animus in the room when they’re together.”
  • In a conversation about a heated argument, someone might comment, “The animus between them was evident.”

15. Hostility

A state of being unfriendly or antagonistic towards someone or something.

  • For example, “There was a clear atmosphere of hostility in the room.”
  • A person might say, “His hostility towards me is unwarranted.”
  • In a discussion about workplace conflict, someone might comment, “The hostility between the two colleagues is affecting the whole team.”

16. Vengeance

This term refers to the act of seeking revenge or retribution for a perceived wrong or injustice. It implies a strong desire to retaliate against someone or something that has caused harm or offense.

  • For example, “He swore vengeance against his enemies and plotted his revenge.”
  • In a movie, a character might say, “I will have my vengeance, no matter the cost.”
  • A person discussing a personal conflict might declare, “I won’t rest until I have vengeance for what they did to me.”

17. Contention

This word is used to describe a state of disagreement or discord between individuals or groups. It implies a verbal or physical struggle, often characterized by heated arguments or confrontations.

  • For instance, “There was contention between the two political parties during the debate.”
  • In a family dispute, someone might say, “There’s always contention between my siblings and me.”
  • A person discussing a contentious issue might state, “The contention between the two sides has escalated into violence.”

18. Spat

This term refers to a minor or petty quarrel or disagreement between individuals, often characterized by a brief exchange of heated words.

  • For example, “They had a spat over who should do the dishes.”
  • In a relationship, a couple might have a spat over a trivial matter like leaving the toilet seat up.
  • Two friends might have a spat over a difference in opinion, but quickly reconcile.
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19. Feud

A long-standing and bitter dispute or rivalry between individuals or groups. It implies a deep-seated animosity and a desire for revenge or dominance.

  • For instance, “The Hatfields and McCoys had a famous feud that lasted for generations.”
  • In a fictional story, two noble families might engage in a deadly feud over control of the kingdom.
  • A person discussing a family feud might say, “Our families have been feuding for as long as I can remember.”

20. Grievance

This term refers to a real or perceived injustice or wrongdoing that causes resentment or anger. It implies a sense of personal offense and a desire for resolution or redress.

  • For example, “He filed a grievance against his employer for unfair treatment.”
  • In a social justice context, someone might say, “We must address the grievances of marginalized communities.”
  • A person discussing a personal grievance might state, “I have a legitimate grievance against my neighbor for constantly playing loud music.”

21. Vendetta

A long-standing and bitter conflict or rivalry between two individuals or groups. A vendetta often involves seeking revenge or retribution for past wrongs.

  • For example, “The two families have had a vendetta for generations, constantly seeking to one-up each other.”
  • In a discussion about historical conflicts, one might mention, “The Hatfield-McCoy feud is one of the most famous vendettas in American history.”
  • A character in a novel might declare, “I will have my vendetta against those who wronged me, no matter the cost.”

22. Discordance

A state of disagreement or conflict between individuals or groups. Discordance often refers to a lack of harmony or agreement.

  • For instance, “The discordance between the two political parties is evident in their conflicting policies.”
  • In a discussion about music, one might say, “The dissonant chords create a sense of discordance in the song.”
  • A person describing a tense family gathering might comment, “There was a lot of discordance in the room, with everyone arguing and shouting.”

23. Alienation

The feeling of being excluded, separated, or disconnected from others. Alienation often refers to a sense of isolation or loneliness.

  • For example, “After moving to a new city, she felt a sense of alienation from her old friends.”
  • In a discussion about societal issues, one might say, “Many people experience alienation due to societal expectations and norms.”
  • A character in a novel might express, “His alienation from society led him down a dark path.”

24. Dislike

A feeling of not liking or having a negative opinion about someone or something. Dislike often refers to a mild form of animosity or a lack of preference.

  • For instance, “I have a dislike for spicy food, so I avoid it.”
  • In a discussion about movies, one might say, “I have a strong dislike for horror films.”
  • A person expressing their feelings might state, “I have a dislike for people who are dishonest.”

25. Displeasure

A feeling of dissatisfaction or unhappiness with someone or something. Displeasure often refers to a mild form of animosity or discontent.

  • For example, “She expressed her displeasure with the service she received at the restaurant.”
  • In a discussion about work, one might say, “I’ve voiced my displeasure with the new company policies.”
  • A character in a movie might show their displeasure through a frown or a scowl.

26. Detestation

Detestation refers to a strong feeling of dislike or hatred towards someone or something.

  • For example, “I have a detestation for people who are dishonest.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “I detest your attitude.”
  • A person might express their detestation towards a particular food by saying, “I detest olives.”

27. Acrimony

Acrimony refers to bitterness or hostility in a relationship or situation.

  • For instance, “Their divorce was filled with acrimony and arguments.”
  • In a political debate, one might accuse the other party of acrimony by saying, “Your acrimonious remarks are not helpful.”
  • A person might describe a tense workplace environment as one filled with acrimony.

28. Odium

Odium refers to intense hatred or disgust towards someone or something.

  • For example, “The criminal’s actions have brought odium upon his family.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial figure, someone might say, “He is viewed with great odium by many.”
  • A person might express their odium towards a particular ideology by saying, “I feel nothing but odium towards those who promote hate.”

29. Disaffection

Disaffection refers to a lack of trust or loyalty towards a person, group, or institution.

  • For instance, “The employees’ disaffection towards their company led to a strike.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “There is a growing disaffection among voters towards the current government.”
  • A person might express their disaffection towards a particular social movement by saying, “I have a deep disaffection for their methods.”

30. Mistrust

Mistrust refers to a lack of confidence or suspicion towards someone or something.

  • For example, “There is a deep mistrust between the two rival factions.”
  • In a relationship, one partner might express their mistrust by saying, “I can’t trust you anymore.”
  • A person might describe their general attitude as one of mistrust towards strangers.

31. Rancor

A deep-seated feeling of bitterness or resentment towards someone or something. “Rancor” is often used to describe intense and long-lasting animosity.

  • For example, “There has been rancor between the two families for generations.”
  • In a political debate, one might say, “The rancor between the two candidates was palpable.”
  • A person discussing a long-standing feud might say, “The rancor between the Hatfields and McCoys is legendary.”

32. Contempt

A strong feeling of disrespect or disregard towards someone or something. “Contempt” is often used to describe a deep-seated animosity based on a sense of superiority or moral judgment.

  • For instance, “She looked at him with nothing but contempt in her eyes.”
  • In a legal setting, one might say, “The witness showed contempt for the prosecutor.”
  • A person discussing a disliked public figure might say, “I have nothing but contempt for that politician.”

33. Animosity

A strong feeling of hostility or ill will towards someone or something. “Animosity” is a general term for intense dislike or hatred.

  • For example, “There is a deep animosity between the two rival gangs.”
  • In a sports rivalry, one might say, “The animosity between the two teams is palpable on the field.”
  • A person discussing a bitter breakup might say, “There is still a lot of animosity between us.”

34. Disagreement

A difference of opinion or a clash of ideas. “Disagreement” refers to a milder form of animosity or opposition compared to other slang terms for animosity.

  • For instance, “They had a disagreement about where to go for dinner.”
  • In a political debate, one might say, “There is a fundamental disagreement on this issue.”
  • A person discussing a heated argument might say, “We had a major disagreement, but we were able to resolve it.”

35. Antagonism

An active opposition or hostility towards someone or something. “Antagonism” often implies a deliberate effort to provoke or challenge.

  • For example, “The two neighbors had a history of antagonism.”
  • In a workplace setting, one might say, “There is a lot of antagonism between the two departments.”
  • A person discussing a confrontational encounter might say, “His antagonism towards me was unwarranted.”

36. Clashing

This term refers to a strong disagreement or conflict between two or more individuals or groups. It often implies a clash of ideas, beliefs, or values.

  • For example, “There was a lot of clashing between the two political parties during the debate.”
  • In a discussion about different musical genres, one might say, “There is always clashing between fans of rock and fans of pop music.”
  • A person describing a heated argument might say, “There was so much clashing between them that it was impossible to find common ground.”

37. Loathing

Loathing refers to an intense feeling of dislike or hatred towards someone or something. It often implies a deep-seated animosity or strong aversion.

  • For instance, “She felt nothing but loathing towards her ex-boyfriend after he cheated on her.”
  • In a discussion about a disliked public figure, one might say, “There is widespread loathing for the politician among the general population.”
  • A person expressing their distaste for a certain food might say, “I have a strong loathing for mushrooms and can’t stand the taste.”

38. Tension

Tension refers to a state of strained relations or unease between individuals or groups. It often implies a feeling of hostility or discomfort.

  • For example, “There was a lot of tension in the room after the argument.”
  • In a discussion about a high-stakes sporting event, one might say, “The tension between the rival teams was palpable.”
  • A person describing a difficult family gathering might say, “There was so much tension between my parents that it was hard to enjoy the dinner.”

39. Friction

Friction refers to a state of conflict or disagreement between individuals or groups. It often implies a clash of personalities or opposing views.

  • For instance, “There was a lot of friction between the two coworkers.”
  • In a discussion about social issues, one might say, “There is often friction between different groups with conflicting interests.”
  • A person describing a strained relationship might say, “There has always been friction between my sister and me.”

40. Strife

Strife refers to a state of conflict or struggle between individuals or groups. It often implies a long-standing or ongoing disagreement or animosity.

  • For example, “The country was torn apart by political strife.”
  • In a discussion about workplace dynamics, one might say, “There is a lot of strife between different departments.”
  • A person describing a turbulent period in their life might say, “I went through a lot of personal strife during that time.”

41. Discontent

This refers to a feeling of dissatisfaction or lack of contentment with a situation or condition.

  • For instance, “There was widespread discontent among the employees due to the company’s unfair policies.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “The discontent among the citizens led to protests and demonstrations.”
  • A person discussing their personal life might admit, “I’ve been feeling a sense of discontent lately, and I’m not sure why.”

42. Disgruntlement

This term describes a state of annoyance, dissatisfaction, or resentment towards someone or something.

  • For example, “The employees expressed their disgruntlement over the long working hours.”
  • In a customer service context, a person might say, “I called the helpline to voice my disgruntlement with their poor service.”
  • A disgruntled customer might leave a negative review and write, “I am extremely disgruntled with the quality of the product.”

43. Dissension

This refers to a disagreement or difference of opinion that leads to conflict or tension.

  • For instance, “There was a lot of dissension among the team members during the decision-making process.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “The dissension within the party led to a split and the formation of a new group.”
  • A person discussing a family dispute might say, “There has been a lot of dissension between my siblings and me regarding the distribution of our parents’ assets.”

44. Estrangement

This term describes a state of being emotionally or socially distanced or disconnected from someone or a group.

  • For example, “After the argument, there was a sense of estrangement between the two friends.”
  • In a family context, someone might say, “The estrangement between the siblings has been going on for years.”
  • A person discussing a failed relationship might admit, “The constant arguments and misunderstandings led to our estrangement.”

45. Foe

This refers to a person or entity that is regarded as an opponent or adversary.

  • For instance, “He saw his former friend as a foe after their falling out.”
  • In a war or conflict context, someone might say, “The soldiers faced their foes bravely on the battlefield.”
  • A person discussing their competition in a sports event might say, “We are determined to defeat our foes and win the championship.”

46. Conflict

A state of disagreement or opposition between two or more parties. Conflict can arise from differing opinions, interests, or goals.

  • For example, “There is an ongoing conflict between the two countries over territorial claims.”
  • In a workplace setting, a manager might say, “We need to address the conflict between these two employees.”
  • A person discussing a family dispute might say, “The conflict between siblings has been going on for years.”

47. Grudgeship

A term used to describe a long-lasting feeling of anger, bitterness, or resentment towards someone. Grudgeship often refers to a deep-seated animosity or hostility that is held onto for an extended period of time.

  • For instance, “He still holds grudgeship towards his ex-partner for betraying him.”
  • In a conversation about forgiveness, someone might say, “Letting go of grudgeship can be liberating.”
  • A person discussing a strained friendship might say, “We used to be close, but now there’s grudgeship between us.”

48. Clash

A term used to describe a direct and often heated disagreement or conflict between two or more parties. A clash typically involves a strong clash of opinions, ideas, or interests.

  • For example, “There was a clash between protesters and police during the demonstration.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “The clash between liberals and conservatives is becoming increasingly intense.”
  • A person describing a disagreement with a coworker might say, “We had a clash of personalities, and it affected our working relationship.”

49. Dispute

A term used to describe a verbal or written disagreement or argument between two or more parties. A dispute often involves a difference of opinion, interpretation, or perspective.

  • For instance, “The couple had a dispute over how to handle their finances.”
  • In a legal context, someone might say, “The two parties are in a dispute over the terms of the contract.”
  • A person discussing a neighborhood disagreement might say, “There’s a dispute between the residents about parking regulations.”

50. Quarrel

A term used to describe a heated or angry argument or disagreement between two or more people. A quarrel often involves shouting, name-calling, or other forms of verbal aggression.

  • For example, “The siblings had a quarrel over who would get to use the computer.”
  • In a relationship context, someone might say, “Couples often have minor quarrels, but it’s important to resolve them.”
  • A person describing a disagreement with a friend might say, “We had a quarrel, but we made up afterwards.”

51. Disunity

Disunity refers to a state of disagreement or lack of harmony among a group of people or entities. It describes a situation where there is a lack of agreement or cooperation.

  • For example, “The disunity among the team members led to a lack of progress.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “The disunity within the party is causing a divide among its members.”
  • A social commentator might argue, “Disunity among communities can hinder progress and social cohesion.”

52. Animadversion

Animadversion refers to a critical comment or remark made about someone or something. It implies a strong disapproval or criticism towards the subject.

  • For instance, “His animadversion towards the government’s policies was evident in his speech.”
  • In a review of a movie, a critic might write, “The animadversion towards the film’s plot twists was justified.”
  • A person might say, “I couldn’t help but express my animadversion towards his rude behavior.”

53. Opprobrium

Opprobrium refers to harsh criticism or public disgrace directed towards someone or something. It implies a strong disapproval or condemnation.

  • For example, “The politician faced widespread opprobrium for his controversial statements.”
  • In a scandal involving a public figure, the media might report, “The actor’s actions have brought opprobrium upon himself.”
  • A social media post might read, “The company’s unethical practices deserve nothing but opprobrium.”

54. Repugnance

Repugnance refers to an intense feeling of disgust or aversion towards someone or something. It implies a strong sense of dislike or revulsion.

  • For instance, “She couldn’t hide her repugnance towards the unpleasant smell.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might express, “I feel a deep repugnance towards discrimination.”
  • A person might say, “The idea of eating insects fills me with repugnance.”

55. Abhorrence

Abhorrence refers to an extreme feeling of hatred or loathing towards someone or something. It implies a strong aversion or detestation.

  • For example, “The abhorrence towards violence was evident in her actions.”
  • In a debate about a moral issue, someone might argue, “I have an abhorrence towards any form of cruelty.”
  • A person might say, “The abhorrence I feel towards injustice motivates me to fight for equality.”

56. Disapproval

Disapproval refers to the act of not liking or disagreeing with something or someone. It is a feeling of animosity or disfavor towards a particular thing or person.

  • For example, “I expressed my disapproval of his actions by refusing to speak to him.”
  • A parent might show disapproval by saying, “I strongly disapprove of your behavior.”
  • In a work setting, a manager might express disapproval by giving negative feedback on a project.
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57. Disfavor

Disfavor refers to an unfavorable opinion or treatment towards someone or something. It is a form of animosity or disapproval directed towards a particular person or thing.

  • For instance, “She fell out of favor with her boss and was treated with disfavor.”
  • A politician might face disfavor from the public due to a scandal.
  • In a social setting, someone might experience disfavor from a group for breaking a rule.