Top 23 Slang For Anxiously – Meaning & Usage

Feeling on edge or jittery? We’ve got you covered with a list of slang terms for anxiously that will have you nodding in recognition. Whether you’re a worrywart or just feeling a bit on edge, our team has gathered the latest phrases to help you navigate the world of anxiety with a touch of humor and understanding. So sit back, relax, and get ready to dive into the world of slang for anxiously like never before!

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1. On edge

When someone is on edge, they are feeling tense, anxious, or nervous about something. It often implies a heightened state of alertness or unease.

  • For example, “I’ve been on edge all day waiting for the test results.”
  • A person might say, “I’m on edge about the upcoming job interview.”
  • Another might express, “The constant noise in the neighborhood has me on edge.”

2. Freaking out

When someone is freaking out, they are experiencing intense anxiety, panic, or fear. It implies a state of extreme distress or agitation.

  • For instance, “I’m freaking out about the deadline for this project.”
  • A person might say, “I started freaking out when I realized I lost my wallet.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I’m freaking out because I can’t find my keys!”

3. Jittery

When someone is jittery, they are feeling nervous, anxious, or uneasy. It can manifest in physical symptoms such as trembling or restlessness.

  • For example, “I feel jittery before every public speaking engagement.”
  • A person might say, “I get jittery when I have to make an important phone call.”
  • Another might explain, “I always feel jittery when I’m waiting for exam results.”

4. Nail-biting

When someone is nail-biting, they are feeling extremely anxious or nervous. It is a metaphorical term referring to the action of biting one’s nails, which is often done as a nervous habit.

  • For instance, “I’m nail-biting over the outcome of the job interview.”
  • A person might say, “The suspense of waiting for the test results has me nail-biting.”
  • Another might confess, “I’m a nail-biter when it comes to making important decisions.”

5. Sweating bullets

When someone is sweating bullets, they are feeling extremely anxious or nervous to the point where they are sweating profusely. It is a vivid metaphorical expression depicting the intensity of anxiety.

  • For example, “I was sweating bullets before going on stage to perform.”
  • A person might say, “The thought of giving a presentation makes me sweat bullets.”
  • Another might share, “I sweat bullets whenever I have to confront someone about a difficult issue.”

6. Jumping out of skin

This phrase is used to describe someone who is extremely anxious or nervous. It implies that the person is so on edge that they feel like their skin is about to jump off their body.

  • For example, “I was jumping out of my skin waiting for the test results.”
  • Someone might say, “The suspense was killing me, I was jumping out of my skin.”
  • Another person might describe their anxiety by saying, “I’m so nervous about the presentation, I feel like I’m jumping out of my skin.”

7. Twitchy

This term is used to describe someone who is easily startled or agitated. It suggests that the person is constantly on edge and prone to sudden movements or reactions.

  • For instance, “He’s always twitchy, you never know what’s going to set him off.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling really twitchy today, I can’t sit still.”
  • Another example would be, “The loud noises make me twitchy, I always jump when I hear them.”

8. Wound up

This phrase is used to describe someone who is feeling tense, anxious, or stressed. It implies that the person is tightly wound, like a spring that is ready to snap.

  • For example, “I’m really wound up about the big presentation tomorrow.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t relax, I’m too wound up.”
  • Another example would be, “I’m feeling really wound up, I need to take a break and unwind.”

9. Panic-stricken

This term is used to describe someone who is completely overcome with fear or anxiety. It suggests that the person is in a state of panic and unable to think or act rationally.

  • For instance, “She was panic-stricken when she realized she had lost her phone.”
  • A person might say, “I felt panic-stricken when I heard the loud crash.”
  • Another example would be, “The thought of public speaking makes me panic-stricken.”

10. Anxious as a cat on a hot tin roof

This phrase is used to describe someone who is extremely anxious or nervous. It suggests that the person is so on edge that they are as jumpy and restless as a cat walking on a hot tin roof.

  • For example, “I’m as anxious as a cat on a hot tin roof waiting for the test results.”
  • A person might say, “The anticipation is making me as anxious as a cat on a hot tin roof.”
  • Another example would be, “I always get anxious before a big presentation, I’m as nervous as a cat on a hot tin roof.”

11. Antsy

This term is used to describe a feeling of nervousness or unease, often accompanied by fidgeting or a desire to move or do something. It can also refer to a state of excitement or anticipation.

  • For example, “I’m getting antsy waiting for the bus to arrive.”
  • Someone might say, “I always get antsy before a big presentation.”
  • A person waiting for their turn might say, “I’m getting antsy in this long line.”

12. Nervous wreck

This phrase is used to describe someone who is in a state of extreme anxiety or stress, often to the point of being unable to function properly. It implies that the person is on the verge of breaking down or losing control.

  • For instance, “I’m a nervous wreck before exams.”
  • Someone might say, “She’s a nervous wreck every time she has to speak in public.”
  • A person might describe themselves as a nervous wreck during a particularly stressful period in their life.
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13. Hair-raising

This term is used to describe something that is extremely frightening or anxiety-inducing. It implies that the experience or situation is so intense that it makes one’s hair stand on end.

  • For example, “That roller coaster ride was hair-raising!”
  • Someone might say, “The horror movie I watched last night was truly hair-raising.”
  • A person recounting a near-death experience might say, “It was a hair-raising moment when the car swerved off the road.”

14. Strung out

This phrase is used to describe someone who is feeling worn out or depleted as a result of prolonged stress or anxiety. It can also refer to someone who is under the influence of drugs.

  • For instance, “I’ve been working long hours and I’m feeling really strung out.”
  • Someone might say, “She looks strung out from all the pressure she’s been under.”
  • A person might describe themselves as strung out after a sleepless night of worrying.

15. In a tizzy

This phrase is used to describe someone who is in a state of extreme agitation or panic. It implies a feeling of being overwhelmed or flustered.

  • For example, “She’s in a tizzy trying to get everything ready for the party.”
  • Someone might say, “I was in a tizzy when I realized I had lost my wallet.”
  • A person might describe themselves as being in a tizzy before a big presentation or performance.

16. Edgy

When someone is feeling edgy, they are on edge or easily agitated. It often implies a sense of unease or anxiety.

  • For example, “I have a big presentation tomorrow and I’m feeling really edgy about it.”
  • A person might say, “I always feel edgy when I’m in crowded places.”
  • Another might exclaim, “Don’t make me edgy with your loud music!”

17. Agitated

When someone is agitated, they are feeling restless, irritated, or anxious. It often implies a state of heightened emotion or nervousness.

  • For instance, “He was agitated and couldn’t sit still during the movie.”
  • A person might say, “I get agitated when I’m running late.”
  • Another might exclaim, “Stop tapping your foot, it’s making me agitated!”

18. Uneasy

When someone is uneasy, they are feeling uncomfortable, apprehensive, or anxious. It often implies a sense of unease or uncertainty.

  • For example, “I had an uneasy feeling about the situation.”
  • A person might say, “I always feel uneasy when I’m alone in the dark.”
  • Another might express, “Something about his tone made me feel uneasy.”

19. Panicky

When someone is panicky, they are feeling extreme fear, anxiety, or panic. It often implies a state of heightened distress or unease.

  • For instance, “She started to feel panicky when she realized she was lost.”
  • A person might say, “I get panicky in crowded spaces.”
  • Another might exclaim, “Don’t leave me alone, I’ll get panicky!”

20. Shaky

When someone is shaky, they are feeling physically or emotionally unstable. It often implies a sense of nervousness or vulnerability.

  • For example, “Her voice was shaky as she delivered the news.”
  • A person might say, “I always get shaky before a big test.”
  • Another might express, “My hands get shaky when I’m nervous.”

21. Anxious as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs

This phrase is used to describe someone who is feeling very anxious or on edge. It implies that the person is so nervous that they are constantly on the lookout for potential dangers or threats, similar to how a cat would be in a room full of rocking chairs.

  • For example, “I have a big presentation tomorrow and I’m as anxious as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs.”
  • Another example, “She’s always anxious as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs before flying.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t handle crowded places, I get as anxious as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs.”

22. Anxious as a cat in a room full of rocking chairs

Similar to the previous phrase, this expression is used to convey a high level of anxiety. It suggests that the person is constantly on edge and easily startled, just like a cat in a room full of rocking chairs.

  • For instance, “I’m waiting for the test results and I’m as anxious as a cat in a room full of rocking chairs.”
  • Another example, “He’s always anxious as a cat in a room full of rocking chairs before meeting new people.”
  • A person might say, “I hate horror movies, they make me as anxious as a cat in a room full of rocking chairs.”

23. Panicking

To panic means to feel a sudden and intense fear or anxiety. It is a state of extreme distress and often involves a loss of control or rational thinking.

  • For example, “I lost my wallet and started panicking.”
  • Another example, “She panicked when she realized she was late for an important meeting.”
  • A person might say, “I always start panicking when I’m in a crowded elevator.”